Marching Forward Frequently Asked Questions

Updated March 15, 2022, 3:00 p.m. | Back to Marching Forward site

Vaccines

While Carroll is not requiring students to be vaccinated for COVID-19, we strongly recommend that all students and members of the campus community get the vaccine and booster. It is free and widely available. More people vaccinated will keep our campus community safer and means fewer chances for the virus to spread.

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines protect against getting sick from COVID-19 and provide significant protection against serious illness and death from COVID-19. 

Protecting yourself also helps protect the people around you, like those at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 or those who can’t get vaccinated — including infants, or people with weakened immune systems from things like chemotherapy for cancer.

All authorized COVID-19 vaccines provide significant protection from serious illness and hospitalization. Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

The Moderna vaccine is recommended for people aged 18+ and includes 2 shots spaced 28 days apart. It is a messenger RNA, or mRNA, vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Moderna vaccine provides significant protection against serious illness.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is recommended for people aged 12+ and includes 2 shots spaced 21 days apart. It is an mRNA vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine provides significant protection against serious illness.

The Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine is delivered in one shot only. It is a viral vector vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine also provides significant protection against serious illness. Health officials are closely monitoring all vaccines for safety, including the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Having multiple types of vaccines available is crucial so that vaccination programs can quickly reach as many people as possible.

Please go to the CDC's COVID Data Tracker to check the level of community transmission in the United States, including Lewis and Clark County.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

The vaccine is not a cure but it is a layer of protection. The vaccine helps to prevent you from developing severe symptoms from the virus and also reduces the risks of you spreading the virus.

Vaccines are authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which sets strict standards for clinical trials and rigorously evaluates scientific data submitted by vaccine developers. Once vaccines are made available to the public, the FDA continues to monitor vaccines very closely for safety.

Researchers began developing vaccines for COVID-19 in January 2020, based on decades of understanding immune response and how vaccines work. Thousands of volunteers participated in clinical trials that started that spring, making sure we can trust the vaccines to be safe and effective.

Based on the results, the FDA has authorized multiple vaccines for public use. In December 2020, the FDA authorized two versions of COVID-19 vaccines (Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech) for the American public. A third (Johnson & Johnson) was added in February 2021 and is currently available for use in the United States after a pause in April 2021. Doctors and medical experts with many years of experience regulating vaccines evaluated information about the safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality of the vaccines prior to making their decision.

After a vaccine is authorized by the FDA and made available to the public, experts continue to closely monitor the vaccines for ongoing safety and to help us learn more about questions like how long vaccines will provide protection.

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected.

If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Serious side effects that would cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following COVID-19 vaccination.

Long-term side effects following any vaccination are extremely rare. Vaccine monitoring has historically shown that if side effects are going to happen, they generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose.

For this reason, the Food and Drug Administration required each of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines to be studied for at least eight weeks after the final dose. Millions of people have received COVID-19 vaccines, and no long-term side effects have been detected.

CDC recommends that everyone age 5 and older in the United States get vaccinated against COVID-19 as soon as they can. Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping people from getting COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine will also help keep people from getting seriously ill even if they do get COVID-19.

Although most people who contract COVID-19 get better within weeks to months of illness, some do not. CDC and experts around the world are working to learn more about short- and long-term health effects associated with COVID-19, who gets them, and why. People with long COVID report experiencing different combinations of symptoms such as tiredness or fatigue, difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”), headache, difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, or loss of smell or taste.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

HB 702

The Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DOL) guidance states:

House Bill 702 (“HB 702”) was passed by the 2021 Montana Legislature and became effective when signed by Governor Gianforte on May 7, 2021. The law prohibits discrimination based on vaccination status or having an immunity passport.

The law will be published as part of the Montana Human Rights Act in Title 49, chapter 2, part 3 of the Montana Code Annotated.

Prior to enactment of HB 702, the Montana Human Rights Act generally prohibited discrimination based on “race, creed, religion, color, sex, physical or mental disability, age, or national origin.”  See Mont. Code Ann. § 49-1-102. Carroll College’s understanding is that HB 702 effectively adds “vaccination status” to that list of prohibited forms of discrimination in Montana.

Compliance with state and federal laws is critically important to Carroll College. Carroll is working hard to fully understand, and comply with, this new area of law. At present, Carroll College’s understanding is that HB 702 does place some limitations on the college’s public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Carroll College’s goal is to balance public health guidance with its obligation to comply with HB 702.

Because HB 702 is relatively new, Carroll College anticipates its understanding of the law may change over time as Montana’s courts interpret and apply it. The Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DOL) has issued initial guidance interpreting HB 702.

In this FAQ section, Carroll College has drafted FAQs which highlight DOL guidance and detail how Carroll College plans to address HB 702 this year. It is likely this guidance will evolve over time.

It is unclear whether Carroll College can require students to receive COVID-19 vaccines as a condition of attendance at Carroll College. Carroll College is not aware of any Montana school, outside of the tribal colleges, that is requiring COVID-19 vaccines for students, which confirms the lack of clarity on this issue. Carroll College will closely follow legal developments on HB 702. Again, this is a rapidly changing area of law in Montana.

Although Carroll College is not requiring Carroll College students to obtain a COVID-19 vaccine at this time, Carroll College strongly encourages all students to obtain a COVID-19 vaccine if they are medically able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s vaccination recommendations.

No. At present, Carroll College’s understanding is that it cannot require faculty, staff, or campus visitors to receive a COVID-19 vaccine under HB 702. Carroll College strongly encourages all faculty and staff to receive a COVID-19 vaccine if they are medically able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s vaccination recommendations.

The DOL guidance states: 

Nothing in the language of HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from asking about vaccination status or whether you have an immunity passport. However, if asked, a person is not required to respond and may not be discriminated against for failing to respond.

Carroll College students already provide vaccination information to the Carroll College Wellness Center. At present, Carroll College’s intention is to treat students’ COVID-19 vaccination status the same as other vaccination records. Consistent with past practices, a limited number of Carroll College personnel may ask you whether you have received the COVID-19 vaccine, including: (i) Carroll College Wellness Center staff will ask all students for their Carroll College COVID-19 vaccination status; (ii) the Carroll College Athletic Department may ask Carroll College student-athletes for their COVID-19 vaccination status; and (iii) the Carroll College Nursing Department may ask nursing students for their COVID-19 vaccination status.

Please note that, according to the DOL guidance, Carroll College students are “not required to respond” to any questions about their vaccination status. Carroll College will not discriminate against students regardless of how they respond to questions about their vaccination status.

The DOL guidance states: 

Nothing in the language of HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from asking about vaccination status or whether you have an immunity passport. However, if asked, a person is not required to respond and may not be discriminated against for failing to respond.

Although HB 702 does not prohibit Carroll College from asking its employees about their vaccination status, at this time Carroll College only anticipates authorizing members of the Carroll College Human Resource Office to collect this information from faculty and staff. Please note that faculty and staff are not required to respond to these requests, and Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone based on their response to requests regarding vaccination status.

The DOL guidance states:

Yes. Nothing in HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, or public accommodation from asking or suggesting you wear a mask.

Carroll College strongly recommends all members of the Carroll College campus community wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic if they are able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s masking recommendations.

No. The DOL guidance makes it clear that mask policies must apply equally to “everyone . . . regardless of vaccination status.”  Carroll College representatives are not authorized to direct or request that only unvaccinated students wear masks.

Carroll College’s understanding is that it can require or recommend that students, faculty, and staff be tested for COVID-19, provided that it does so irrespective of their vaccination status. HB 702 does not appear to reference testing for COVID-19, or otherwise limit testing requirements or recommendations.

The DOL guidance states:

Nothing in HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from offering incentives to persons to voluntarily become vaccinated as long as the nature of the incentive is not discriminatory (not so substantial as to be coercive.)

Wellness & Health Services

As of mid-February, the Wellness Center is no longer providing PCR saliva testing. However, for a limited time while supplies last, self-administered rapid antigen tests will be available through the Wellness Center. To acquire a test, visit the Wellness Center between the hours of 9 am-12 pm or 1 pm-4 pm, Monday – Friday. The tests are simple to self-administer and results are available within 15 minutes.

Our student-athletes will continue to undergo PCR testing through the athletic training staff as is required by their respective athletic conferences. If you are required to obtain a date-stamped PCR test as part of an academic class or college-sponsored activity, please work with the course professor or advisor to schedule a test with the athletic training staff.

There are also various locations in Helena which provide COVID-19 testing. Visit the COVID-19 Vaccination and Testing Locations map on the Lewis & Clark Public Health COVID-19 Hub for locations.

In addition, we strongly encourage all students, faculty and staff to take advantage of the offer provided by the federal government to have four (4) free rapid antigen tests mailed to your home or school address to have on hand if needed. The tests take approximately two weeks to arrive once you fill out the simple form at www.covidtests.gov.

If you have a Carroll-sponsored health insurance plan, your insurance will pay you back for eight (8) at-⁠home rapid antigen tests each month for each person on your plan. These test kits should be available at CVS and Walgreens. Additional information for Carroll College employees on the BCBS plan can be found here. Many other insurance companies have similar coverage for COVID-19 testing, so please check with your provider if you are interested in obtaining additional tests. Learn more.

Carroll College has been partnering with Shodair Children's Hospital in Helena for its PCR COVID testing.  With its medical genetics expertise, infrastructure and facilities,  Shodair was approved to use the "SalivaDirect" method for testing that was developed by the Yale Public School of Health. Results show that SalivaDirect is highly sensitive and is accurate 94% of the time, comparable to results for nasopharyngeal swab-based tests (used last fall at Carroll).

The Yale School of Public Health shared the following information about SalivaDirect: 

How  is SalivaDirect different from other testing methods?

In addition to being less expensive, SalivaDirect offers a number of other advantages. They include:

  • It is non-invasive. SalivaDirect requires only a small sample of saliva as opposed to the standard nasopharyngeal (NP) swab. The NP method requires what is essentially a long Q-tip that is inserted deep into the nostril and then rotated.
  • It is quick and safe. Because SalivaDirect only requires a small saliva sample, the time requirement for an individual is minimal, even less than a minute. People basically have to spit into a small container. The procedure is safer in that there is less risk of exposure to health care workers collecting the samples.
  • It is accurate. Results show that SalivaDirect is highly sensitive and is accurate 94% of the time, comparable to results for NP-based tests.

Students & Employees –if you are COVID-19 positive:

Lewis & Clark Public Health, your healthcare provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center will directly contact anyone who has been tested and is confirmed positive for COVID-19.

If you have tested positive, all students and employees should take the following steps:

  • Fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form.
  • Students – If the call comes from Lewis & Clark Public Health, contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report your positive case. If you live on campus, immediately contact Residential Life & Housing at 406.459.0540 so they can facilitate your move into isolation. Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. that you have tested positive and that you will not be attending class/work/practice.
  • Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are COVID-19 positive and will not be attending work.
  • If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at 406.442.2480.
  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider, except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas.
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home - stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

Returning to normal activity: You can return to normal activity according to the CDC Guidelines with others after:

    • At least 5 days since symptoms first appeared AND;
    • At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication AND;
    • Symptoms have improved (Please note:  Loss of taste or smell may persist for weeks or months after recovery and will not have to delay the end of isolation).
    • If you had no symptoms at the time of testing, you can return to normal activity 5 days after your COVID-19 test date as long as you remain asymptomatic.
    • Continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days (days 6-10).

If You Are Exposed to someone with a Suspected or CONFIRMED POSITIVE COVID Test:

Close Contact – Under CDC guidelines, a close contact is defined as “someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinically compatible illness) for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.” 

NOTE:  The COVID Active Case Action Team (CACAT) will review all new pertinent county and campus COVID-19 infection data on a daily basis.  The college reserves the right to update these policies at any time.

  • A close contact is considered asymptomatic if they do not have any of the following symptoms: (i) fever or chills; (ii) cough; (iii) shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (iv) fatigue; (v) muscle or body aches; (vi) headache; (vii) new loss of taste or smell; (viii) sore throat; (ix) congestion or runny nose; (x) nausea or vomiting; or (xi) diarrhea.
  • If you are a Carroll College student or employee and have been exposed to someone with a suspected or confirmed positive COVID-19 test, we will be treating all close asymptomatic contacts the same (Carroll’s policies for asymptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status). 


1.    Carroll College has established the following policies for asymptomatic close contacts:  

a.             Carroll College highly recommends that students consider self-isolating until a negative test result is received.

b.             Close contacts may be identified by the COVID-19 positive individual through the COVID-19 Reporting Form

c.              If you are a confirmed close contact, you must also fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form

d.             The CACAT will track all positive cases and close contacts and will be in communication with each impacted individual. 

e.             Roommates will automatically be considered close contacts.  

f.               All close contacts will be required to wear a mask whenever in a communal space or in the presence of any other individual on Carroll’s campus for 10 full days after the date of exposure even after a negative test result is received.   

g.              All close contacts will be required to test three (3) days after the date of exposure.  If the 3rd day falls on a weekend or holiday, then the testing must take place immediately following the weekend or holiday.

 i.  Carroll offers asymptomatic and symptomatic testing Monday through Friday excluding weekends and holidays. Please call 406-447-5441 to make an appointment for testing.

ii.  A Public Health officer or College representative can help provide information about testing, or you may work with your healthcare provider. The Carroll College Wellness Center may be able to provide some general guidance as well by calling 406.447.5441.

h.             The CACAT team will monitor the 3-day testing period and will send students a notification reminder that they must test in accordance with 1.g. 

i.               Asymptomatic close contacts will not be quarantined unless they violate the testing requirements under sub-bullet 1.g.  

j.               The Student Life team will be informed if a student does not test within the 3-day testing period to launch the student conduct process.   

k.              If asymptomatic close contact students do not test on day 3 or if they fail to wear a mask as required above, this will be considered a student conduct issue at which time the student will go through the Student Conduct process in which the first step is to automatically place the student in quarantine. If the student fails to abide by the quarantine requirement, further sanctions may be warranted.  

l.               All asymptomatic close contacts must monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms for 14 days after learning of their status as a confirmed close contact.  If an asymptomatic close contact develops any COVID-19 symptoms, they must immediately report those symptoms to the Carroll College Wellness Center and take an additional COVID-19 test. 

2.             If you are a close contact and develop symptoms you must follow the protocols under the section above titled “What To Do If You are Ill,” including Isolating yourself if you receive a positive COVID-19 test result, consistent with Carroll College’s confirmed COVID-19 policies.  (Carroll’s policies for symptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status.)

a.             Students – If the call comes from Lewis & Clark Public Health, contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report your symptoms and/or confirmed positive test, if applicable.  If you live on campus, immediately contact Residential Life & Housing at 406.459.0540 so they can facilitate your move into isolation. Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. that you are a confirmed contact and that you will not be attending class/work/practice. 

b.             Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are a confirmed contact and will not be attending work.

c.              If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at 406.442.2480.

d.             Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare provider except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas. 

e.             Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.

f.               Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.

g.              Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home - stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

h.             If you become symptomatic, please refer to “What to Do If You Are Ill”.

If you are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms, immediately call your primary healthcare provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 - do not go to the center before calling first. After assessing your symptoms, your healthcare provider or the Wellness Center may order a COVID-19 test. You will be contacted directly for instructions on how to receive a COVID test. These policies apply regardless of your vaccination status.

  • Until test results are obtained – immediately self-quarantine and please adhere to the following protocols:
    • Students – Contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report that you have been tested and determine the best course of action.
    • Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. to report that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not be attending class/work/practice.
    • You will be required to self-quarantine until your test results come back.
    • Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not be attending work- immediately self-quarantine.
    • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider.
    • You will be required to self-quarantine until your test results come back.  
  • When test results are obtained:
    • An interviewer from Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider will contact you if you test positive for COVID-19. 
    • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, the interviewer or healthcare provider will help you understand what to do next, what support is available, as well as let you know how long you should isolate yourself.

We have worked with Lewis & Clark Public Health to develop the following guidelines for when a student tests positive for Covid-19:

  • If a student has symptoms of COVID-19, they should remain in their room or remain off campus and contact the Wellness Center. If faculty and staff have symptoms of COVID-19, they should remain off campus and contact their healthcare provider.
  • If a student is notified by Public Health that they are a known contact of a COVID-19 positive individual or are COVID-19 positive themselves, they must report that to Student Life.
  • If a student suspects they have COVID-19, our health service can order a test right away at a local healthcare provider.
  • If a student living on campus suspects they have COVID-19 or has had contact with a known COVID-19 carrier and needs to isolate themselves, we have space set aside for those students.
  • If a student is diagnosed with COVID-19, we have space set aside to isolate that student, make sure their needs are met, and quarantine any known contacts. Carroll staff will  contact roommates and work with the student to identify close contacts immediately, and we will continue to work with Public Health contact tracers as their capacity allows.  
  • Students who are isolated or quarantined will be able to continue their coursework remotely.
  • Due to FERPA and HIPAA, we cannot release any information about a student's health and therefore will not be releasing personal information including age, gender, place of residence, or what programs they are involved in. However, when the college is in session, we are publishing a weekly prevalence report on Fridays of COVID-19 positive cases in the Carroll community. The report can be found on the homepage of the Marching Forward website.

Isolation: As defined by Lewis and Clark County Public Health, “Isolation refers to separating people who are sick from those who are not sick.”For the purposes of the Marching Back plan isolation refers to the plan to move individuals with confirmed cases of Covid-19 into separate living arrangements where they can recover and not infect others.

Quarantine: As defined by Lewis and Clark County Public Health, “Quarantine refers to separating people who are, or may have been, exposed to COVID-19, but are not showing signs of illness.” For the purposes of the Marching Back plan, quarantine refers to the plan to wear a mask for 10 days in all public spaces from date of exposure.

Contact: LCPH defines close contact as exposure of 15 minutes or more within 6 feet of the person diagnosed COVID-19 positive, less than 48 hours before symptoms began. Asymptomatic contacts are required to mask in all public spaces for 10 days.

When the college is in session, Carroll College is publishing a weekly prevalence report which provides the number of any new and active COVID-19 cases reported to Carroll College by enrolled students, faculty and staff. Due to federal regulations, we will not be providing any information beyond the number of new cases and the total number of active cases. The report is updated on Fridays and can be found on the homepage of the  Marching Forward website.  

COVID-19 testing is not mandatory but very much encouraged to help us keep our community safe and healthy.

 

Classes

Carroll College will begin spring term classes in-person on Tuesday, January 18. The semester will have traditional scheduling with a one week spring break and an Easter holiday with finals taking place May 9-12. View the academic calendar for specific details and dates.

Masks will be optional in instructional spaces such as classrooms and laboratories and in meetings with professors and college staff beginning March 21, with some possible exceptions. Individual faculty and staff members may continue to require masks in their classrooms, labs, and offices, with students expected to follow those policies.

While the college has used transmission rates as a benchmark in the past, the CDC and Lewis & Clark Public Health now utilize a new Community Level tool which provides guidance based on a wider variety of data points including recent case counts, weekly hospital admissions, and current hospital bed occupancy. The college is continually monitoring the recommended precautions and will notify the college community if this mask policy changes.

Residential Life

Beginning Monday, March 21, Carroll will be moving to a mask optional environment in instructional spaces and in meetings with faculty and staff. Individual faculty and staff members may continue to require masks in their classrooms, labs, and offices, with students expected to follow those policies.

While we have used transmission rates as a benchmark in the past, the CDC and Lewis & Clark Public Health now utilize a new Community Level tool which provides guidance based on a wider variety of data points including recent case counts, weekly hospital admissions, and current hospital bed occupancy. Based on these metrics, as of March 11, Lewis & Clark County is now at the “low” level for precautions.

The county’s guidance for precautions at this level include:

Students, faculty, and staff may choose and are welcome to personally continue wearing masks for any reason.

 

Our housing is not at full capacity. Natural demand has left us with open space for quarantine and isolation, and additional space for students. Masks will not be required in rooms, and we are asking that each roommate talk about and sign a roommate agreement for how they are going to keep each other (and the community) safe as we navigate living in smaller spaces.

Athletics

At this time, Carroll and the Frontier and Cascade Conferences are planning for a regular schedule of all spring sports.

Details can be found on the Carroll Athletics webpage.

Dining Services

Carroll's food service provider, Sodexo, plans to resume all regular services in the dining hall for the spring semester with no additional modifications at this time.

Buildings & Facilities

Our facility services department is in charge of monitoring and of doing the actual disinfecting.  We have purchased many supplies, for instance the fogger machines used on airplanes and in large public spaces and have increased the number of times those facilities are cleaned.  

Prospective Students

Yes, campus tours are available at this time. At this time, masks are optional. We are asking people do self-health checks before they come to campus . Please contact visit@carroll.edu to schedule your visit.

By emailing admission@carroll.edu or by connecting with your personal admission counselor, you can get any questions answered, as well as get phone or virtual meetings set up with financial aid, faculty members, or others who can answer your questions.

In addition, there are virtual tours available online.

Events

At this time, Carroll plans to resume on-campus and in-person events, while continuing to be cautious with large groups and practice health and safety protocols with enhanced cleaning, handwashing and social distancing when possible. 

We will continue to monitor the health situation on campus and in our community and should circumstances change, we will seek guidance from our local, state and federal health professionals regarding events throughout the semester.

For information on Carroll College events, visit our online calendar of events.

Faculty/Staff

Faculty and Staff – if you are COVID-19 positive:

Lewis & Clark Public Health, your health provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center will directly contact anyone who has been tested and is confirmed positive for COVID-19. 

If you are contacted by Lewis & Clark Public Health, all employees should take the following steps:

  • Staff: Notify your supervisor 
  • Faculty: Contact your department chair or VP for Academic Affairs to begin making arrangements 
  • If you are ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center, or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at: 406-457-4180

Please also follow these guidelines:

  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare professional except to get medical care.
  • Do not go to work, school or public areas.  
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home – stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

Returning to normal activity:  You can return to normal activity according to the CDC Guidelines with others after:

  • At least 5 days since symptoms first appeared and
  • At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and
  • Symptoms have improved
  • Continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days (days 6-10)

If you had no symptoms, you can return to normal activity 5 days after your positive test but continue to wear a mask around others for 5 additional days (days 6-10).

 

Faculty and Staff – if you are a confirmed contact:

Close Contact – Under CDC guidelines, a close contact is defined as “someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinically compatible illness) for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.”

NOTE: The COVID Active Case Action Team (CACAT) will review all new pertinent county and campus COVID-19 infection data on a daily basis. The college reserves the right to update these policies at any time.

  • A close contact is considered asymptomatic if they do not have any of the following symptoms: (i) fever or chills; (ii) cough; (iii) shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (iv) fatigue; (v) muscle or body aches; (vi) headache; (vii) new loss of taste or smell; (viii) sore throat; (ix) congestion or runny nose; (x) nausea or vomiting; or (xi) diarrhea.
  • If you are a Carroll College student or employee and have been exposed to someone with a suspected or confirmed positive COVID-19 test, we will be treating all close asymptomatic contacts the same (Carroll’s policies for asymptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status). 

1.       Carroll College has established the following policies for asymptomatic close contacts: 

a.       Carroll College highly recommends that employees consider self-isolating until a negative test result is received.

b.      Close contacts may be identified by the COVID-19 positive individual through the COVID-19 Reporting Form

c.        If you are a confirmed close contact, you must also fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form

d.      All close contacts will be required to wear a mask whenever in a communal space or in the presence of any other individual on Carroll’s campus for 10 full days after the date of exposure even after a negative test result is received.   

e.       All close contacts will be required to test three (3) days after the date of exposure.  If the 3rd day falls on a weekend or holiday, then the testing must take place immediately following the weekend or holiday.

                                                                                   i.                  Carroll offers asymptomatic and symptomatic testing Monday through Friday excluding weekends and holidays. Please call 406-447-5441 to make an appointment for testing.

                                                                               ii.                  A Public Health officer or College representative can help provide information about testing, or you may work with your healthcare provider. The Carroll College Wellness Center may be able to provide some general guidance as well by calling 406.447.5441.

f.          All asymptomatic close contacts must monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms(link is external)(link is external) for 14 days after learning of their status as a confirmed close contact.  If an asymptomatic close contact develops any COVID-19 symptoms, they must immediately report those symptoms to the Carroll College Wellness Center and take an additional COVID-19 test. 

2.       If you are a close contact and develop symptoms you must follow the protocols under the section above titled “What To Do If You are Ill,” including Isolating yourself if you receive a positive COVID-19 test result, consistent with Carroll College’s confirmed COVID-19 policies.  (Carroll’s policies for symptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status.)

a.       Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are a confirmed contact and will not be attending work.

b.      If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at 406.442.2480.

c.        Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare provider except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas.

d.      Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.

e.       Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.

f.          Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home - stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

g.       If you become symptomatic, please refer to “What to do if I feel ill” question.

Faculty and Staff – if you feel ill:

If you feel ill or have been, please follow the guidance below:

  • During regular business hours call the Carroll College Wellness Center 9 am-12 pm and 1 pm-4 pm Monday through Friday (do not go to the center before calling first) or call your local healthcare provider.
    • Carroll College Wellness Center: 406-447-5441
    • The Wellness Center Staff will ask you a series of COVID-related questions about symptoms you may be experiencing such as:
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
      • Fever – 100.4° and above 
      • Chills
      • Runny nose or new sinus congestion
      • Muscle pain
      • Headache
      • Sore throat
      • Fatigue
      • New loss of taste or smell
      • This list does not include all possible symptoms. Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. 
  • After hours, call the St. Peter’s Urgent Care hotline at: 406-457-4180
  • After assessing your symptoms, the Wellness Center may order a COVID-19 test.

If you are tested, until test results are obtained:

  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare professional.
  • Do not go to work, school or public areas.  
  • Notify your supervisors that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not attend class/work/practice.
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home – stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

After test results are obtained:

  • An interviewer from public health will contact you if you (re)test positive for COVID-19, usually by phone. 
  • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, the interviewer will help you understand what to do next and what support is available.
  • Lewis & Clark Public Health will let you know how long you should isolate yourself if you tested positive for COVID-19.  
  • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, complete and submit the COVID-19 Reporting Form

If you are not tested: You can return to campus 48 hours after experiencing your last symptom, including having no fever without fever reducer.

While, in consultation with the Office of Human Resources, a supervisor may request a physician note for an employee’s absence, Carroll’s policy is to treat any medical information as a confidential medical record. Any disclosure of medical information will be shared on a limited basis with only those who have a business necessity to know which may include HR staff, supervisors, and department leadership.

General Questions