FAQs

Faculty Unionization

A key element of the bargaining power of a union is the threat that the represented workers will strike. During a strike, union faculty would be faced with the decision to cross picket lines or abandon their students and the classes they are teaching, abandon the research they are conducting, and abandon the debate, concert, speaker series or service and learning-abroad experience they worked to create. Also during a strike, those not working will not be paid, their benefits during the strike will lapse and their workloads will fall to adjuncts and their non-union colleagues. When an economic strike occurs, the college has the legal right to replace striking employees permanently.

Unions almost always ask for a provision that would require employees to pay union dues. If such a provision were in a contract, then all faculty members would pay union dues, even if they do not favor the union. There is no ability to “opt out” if such a contract clause were in place.

Particularly in moments when there are concerns about budgets and workload, it is all too easy to overlook the aspects of shared governance that are working well. Examples include the respect Carroll’s Board of Trustees and administration have demonstrated for the authority of the faculty regarding appointments, rank and tenure decisions, utilization and supervision of adjuncts, policy development, and selection of departmental and program leadership. It would be naïve to imagine that all of these would be beyond the scope of contract talks. Union supporters argue that unionization strengthens shared governance. It seems obvious, though, that the existence of a faculty union would reduce the range of topics on which shared governance would act, and that this would weaken, not strengthen, shared governance, especially in the long term. Currently, our faculty have the ability to affect change in all of these areas through shared governance without paying dues and without inserting an outside entity that clearly does not understand private, Catholic higher education.

Experience has shown that one of the highest priorities of a union is to establish a contract requirement that all faculty members join the union and pay union dues.

We believe MEA-MFT does not understand the collaborative process by which academic decisions are made at Carroll and the degree to which our faculty manage the significant details of the college. Carroll's shared governance structure can serve as a model for other institutions. Our faculty determine academic policy, exercise curricular control, provide hiring decisions including rank and tenure determinations, manage enrollment in their departments, and influence budget decisions, including revising, developing and adopting the current salary structure at the college – a pay structure which has provided a 6-year average increase to base salary of 3.81% annually. The Board of Trustees has adopted most all of the faculty recommendations over the years due to our strong partnership with Faculty Assembly. We value our productive and collegial relationship and do not believe there is a need for collective bargaining on a campus that has such a strong history of cooperation, participation and reconciliation. Having an outside organization that does not understand our college and our mission is not going to be helpful in a collaborative approach to the issues and concerns of our faculty.

In 2010, as a result of a faculty-led initiative, the Board of Trustees adopted the college’s current salary system. The concept, development, data analysis and refinement of the current salary system was led by Dr. Brad Elison, Dr. Mary Keefe, Dr. Brian Matz, and Terry Mullen. The system was aired and vetted over several Faculty Assembly meetings. The faculty system was then adopted for staff positions. Workload and working conditions are currently addressed through the Faculty Welfare Committee.

Contract negotiations between administration and the union will likely only include a very small representation of union faculty. All aspects of compensation, workload and working conditions will be on the table during each negotiation. These could possibly include among others, teaching loads, class enrollments, class times, the academic calendar, oversight of restricted accounts, sabbaticals, leave, and tuition remission.

We see many possible negatives and no positives from this approach. We see this as being a potentially divisive issue for our faculty, and we have seen no evidence to suggest that the proposal from MEA-MFT can improve the quality of teaching and learning. In fact, we think it may hurt the quality of the education we provide to our students and certainly the level of collegiality currently found on campus.

Collective bargaining is another term for a negotiation. If MEA-MFT becomes the legal bargaining representative for faculty, then the Carroll administration would meet with the union to negotiate over wages and other terms of employment. While both parties have an obligation to bargain in good faith, neither party has an obligation to accept any specific terms. Carroll would have to be certain that the pay and benefits for faculty agreed to in negotiation is in the college's long-term best interest. This is exactly what we do now. There is no reason to believe that this would be any different with a union.

Unionization may create changes in our current shared governance structure. Issues regarding “working conditions,” such as office hours, office space and perhaps other academic policies that affect all faculty, could no longer be decided by the Faculty Assembly without input from the MEA-MFT.

With shared governance, our faculty determine academic policy, exercise curricular control, provide hiring decisions, including rank and tenure determinations, manage enrollment in their departments, and influence budget decisions, including their work revising, developing and adopting the current salary structure at the college. Our collaborative approach to the issues and concerns of our faculty will likely be altered significantly.

The average negotiation for a first contract takes a year or more. There are cases of first contract negotiations continuing for three or four years. As we previously said, while negotiations are on-going, the College cannot make changes on its own to things like wages, workloads or benefits .

MEA-MFT would become the legal representative of our faculty. The College would negotiate with the union on all matters involving wages, workload and working conditions.

We understand MEA-MFT usually charges a percent of the person's annual salary. Given the salary range for most Carroll faculty, MEA-MFT may charge up to $1,000 or more per year. The fees are not inconsequential: a $1,000 per year union fee, instead invested at a modest growth rate of 3% beyond inflation, would yield over $60,000 in today’s dollars across a 35-year career. As each faculty member considers how to vote, they should ask: “What can I get for hundreds of dollars per year that I can't already get for free by participating in the collaborative process already in place at Carroll?” That's a question we hope faculty will answer very carefully before voting for a union and paying dues.

If MEA-MFT is voted in, then it would be the exclusive representative of all faculty in the bargaining unit, including those who voted against the union or simply decided not to vote in the election. The College would be required to negotiate with MEA-MFT on wages, workload and working conditions for all faculty members. Individual faculty members will not have an option to "opt out." In addition, most union contracts require that employees must either join the union and pay dues, or if the employee chooses not to join the union, to pay an “agency fee” which is generally equivalent to dues. This payment provision is called a “union security” clause. Under a MEA-MFT contract with a union security clause, payment of dues or payment of the agency fee is a requirement, which means that if the faculty member fails to pay union dues, he or she may be terminated from employment.

If MEA-MFT is voted in, then it would be the exclusive representative of all faculty in the bargaining unit, including those who voted against the union or simply decided not to vote in the election. In addition, most union contracts require that employees must either join the union and pay dues, or if the employee chooses not to join the union, to pay an “agency fee” which is generally equivalent to dues. This payment provision is called a “union security” clause. Under a MEA-MFT contract with a union security clause, payment of dues or payment of the agency fee is a requirement, which means that if the faculty member fails to pay union dues, he or she may be terminated from employment.

In an election to decide whether faculty want MEA-MFT to represent them, MEA-MFT would win if a simple majority (50% plus one vote) of the faculty votes cast were votes for the union. If the bargaining unit is determined to include eighty (80) members, but only thirty (30) members cast their votes and sixteen (16) of the 30 voters vote for the union, the union would come in to represent all 80 bargaining faculty members. Faculty that choose to ignore anything to do with union representation by not voting, will still be bound by the outcome of the election.

Yes. In 2010, as a result of a faculty-led initiative, the Board of Trustees adopted the college's current salary system. The concept, development, data analysis and refinement of the current salary system was led by Dr. Brad Elison, Dr. Mary Keefe, Dr. Brian Matz, and Terry Mullen. The system was aired and vetted over several Faculty Assembly meetings. The faculty system was then adopted for staff positions. Workload and working conditions are currently addressed through the Faculty Welfare Committee which then reports to the Faculty Assembly.

Yes. Every faculty member who is eligible to vote should vote. This is a decision about your future and the future of the College. No one else at the College can vote so you have to do so. Vote thoughtfully and wisely but make your own decision and VOTE. If you have questions about voting there are posters on campus from the NLRB about the election and who you can contact.

The teaching workload for professors is a 4-4 with most departments offering a 4-3 for those with “management” expectations. This means professors are expected to teach four academic courses per semester for a total of eight courses.

All full-time faculty serve a nine-month term, beginning mid/late-August through mid-May. Each fall, full-time faculty contracts begin the week before classes start in order to attend orientation sessions and meetings.

According to the letter presented to Dr. Evans on August 31, the concerns are workload, working conditions, benefits, and salary.

Several things can happen. First, negotiations might go on for a long time – years – if the parties can't agree. During this time the College cannot make changes to things like wages, workloads or benefits without bargaining about it with MEA-MFT. Finally, if the parties cannot agree, the union might call on faculty to strike to try and get concessions from Carroll College. Employers do not pay employees' wages while they are on strike. Under some circumstances, striking employees have to be replaced during a strike.

Having a union simply means that wages, hours and working conditions will be determined through collective bargaining between a union and the college administration rather than handled through our shared governance system. There is no guarantee that having a union means more money for faculty. Bargaining could mean more, less or the same compensation as faculty would receive without bargaining. Most academic studies show no significant difference in pay and benefits with or without a union, and certainly not a large enough gain to offset the cost of union dues.

Review and seriously consider how and why the faculty at MSU began the difficult and costly process to decertify in 2013, just three years after they narrowly voted to unionize. The same entity supporting the efforts to unionize at Carroll, MEA-MFT, proved to be a less than desirable advocate for their efforts at MSU. While decertification is possible, the use of such a process is rare and unions are seldom voted out once they are voted in. Thus, every faculty member must consider the long-range implications of this singularly important vote.

Often things that are important to individual faculty members are not part of MEA-MFT's goals during bargaining. Negotiations will be handled by MEA-MFT employees, usually with a few College unit employees participating with MEA-MFT representatives. Before a contract that is negotiated becomes effective, the employees generally have an opportunity to vote on whether or not they accept the negotiated terms. Nonetheless, all faculty in a bargaining unit would be governed by the collectively-bargaining contract once it is put in place. All aspects of compensation, workload and working conditions will be on the table during each negotiation. These could possibly include among others, teaching loads, class enrollments, class times, the academic calendar, oversight of restricted accounts, sabbaticals, leave, and tuition remission. 

Shared governance emphasizes shared decision-making and open communication between faculty, the administration and the Board of Trustees. It is a collaborative approach to achieving common goal where faculty members are very much involved in the decision-making process.

Many faculty have asked what the college's position is regarding the possible formation of a faculty union at Carroll College under the MEA-MFT. In considering this issue, we have asked three questions: (1) would MEA-MFT be good for the quality of education; (2) would MEA-MFT be good for our students, and (3) would MEA-MFT be good for our faculty?

In researching the issues and determining the answers to these questions, the college administration found unionization would not be in the best interest of the College and does not support MEA-MFT's efforts to form a faculty union at Carroll. This Q&A provides more detail as to why we oppose this union.

2014-15 Faculty Salary Data

 CountAverage SalaryLow SalaryHigh Salary
Asst. Professor27$49,950.80$ 46,501.52$ 63,183.74
Assoc. Professor30$58,912.04$ 48,389.66$ 73,230.11
Full Professor31$ 69,249.06$ 60,028.43$ 81,749.39
All Faculty88$59,804.02$ 46,501.52$ 81,749.39

MEA-MFT will petition the National Labor and Relations Board (NLRB) on behalf of Carroll faculty, seeking jurisdiction over Carroll College. This process may take as little as 2 weeks or could continue over several years in court depending on the decisions by the NLRB and the faculty.

If the NLRB grants jurisdiction, the faculty body will conduct a secret vote to decide to unionize.

  • If the majority of those faculty members voting vote “no” to unionize, their status remains the same as it is now.
  • If the majority of those faculty members voting vote “yes” to unionize, the College can accept or contest the decision.

If the NLRB does not grant jurisdiction, the faculty status remains the same as it is now.

Carroll operates under a shared governance structure as outlined in the Faculty Handbook. Numerous committees and processes are in place that provide faculty input and representation; specifically, Budget Committee, Faculty Welfare Committee (benefits/salary), Faculty Development Committee (professional development), Cabinet with faculty representation, in addition to regular meetings of the Faculty Dean and Faculty Welfare Committee with the Administration.

Once the new system was implemented in 2010-11, all faculty have generally received the same increase year-after-year as the system is based on the 77 institutions and 6-year rolling average for an associate professor with five years of service. So, once brought to 85 and above, all faculty remained at this level as a function of the salary matrix, moving in accordance with the annual aging figure. Promotions are the exception and are not included in the averages.

History of Pay Increases for Faculty

Fiscal YearAverage % Increase to Base SalaryAdjustment
09-100.0%Development of new salary system
10-116.65%Implementation of system, All to 85% of current market
11-124.25% 85% of current market; 1% increase to those above 85%
12-133.64% 85% of current market; 1% increase to those above 85%
13-14 (thru 09/30/14)3.66%89% of current market; All faculty received 3.66% increase to base
14-15 (10/1 thru 9/30)2.96%89% of market; 1% increase to those above 89%
15-16 (10/1 thru 9/30)1.70%BOT authorized 1.7% increase to base pay, All employees at 88.13% of current market
Averages
5 Year Average3.24% 
6 Year Average3.81% 
7 Year Average3.26% 

Voting in a union only requires a negotiation. It does not require the two sides to agree to any particular terms. A union contract, if successfully negotiated, would speak to wages, hours and working conditions for faculty. There is no guarantee, and no one can promise, what specific provisions a union contract would contain. The most likely provision would be a requirement that all faculty pay union dues. Most faculty may likely pay hundreds of dollars per year and some may pay $1,000 or more per year in union dues.

As a Catholic institution, we are fundamentally unopposed to the concept of unions. Catholic social teaching has taught us the value of union representation to give voice to the oppressed. We embrace the Church's commitment to solidarity, and there is certainly a time, place and value in unions.

At Carroll, we operate under a shared governance model, which emphasizes shared decision-making between faculty, the administration and the Board of Trustees. It is a collaborative approach to achieving common goals where faculty members are very much involved in the decision-making process. As an institution whose mission stems from the Second Vatican Council, we believe this shared governance model supports the principles of collaboration, collegiality, conciliation, and subsidiarity espoused by the council. Our faculty members have a very active role in managing the college, and the Faculty Assembly is the center of policy making within the college. We strongly believe bringing in a third party would greatly diminish the collaborative nature of our work together and are therefore opposed to this proposal.

In addition to our strong belief in our shared governance structure, there are several other important reasons why Carroll opposes the unionization of our faculty. At Carroll, we are very proud and committed to the principles under which the college was founded. We are a Catholic, diocesan institution which recognizes the importance of protecting our educational mission and Catholic identity. We believe strongly that the faculty at Carroll College are instrumental in fulfilling the mission of the college and cannot be organized through the NLRB because to do so would violate the First Amendment separation of church and state. The National Labor Relations Act exempted religious institutions from the jurisdiction of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). In order to reach institutions like Carroll College, the NLRB has attempted to show that our institutions are “not substantially religious" and, thus, within their jurisdiction. Carroll College and the other religious colleges opposing unionization, where unionization has been attempted, strongly object to the criteria applied to determine whether a school is “religious enough”. We think this creates an unconstitutional entanglement of government with religion and Carroll College opposes unionization to preserve its First Amendment rights.

Furthermore, it has been a long-standing position of the NLRB, and supported by the U.S. Supreme Court, that if full-time faculty members at private colleges have managerial duties, including control of several significant areas of college affairs, they are not eligible for unionization. Our faculty members have a very active role in managing the college, and the Faculty Assembly is the center of policy making within the college. Our faculty members determine academic policy, exercise curricular control, provide hiring decisions including rank and tenure determinations, manage enrollment in their departments, and influence budget decisions, including revising, developing and adopting the current salary structure at the college. We do not believe that the NLRB should have moved away from its long-standing rules on faculty, but even under their new criteria, Carroll College faculty are "managerial."

Establishing a union only requires negotiation with the union for wages, workload and working conditions. That does not mean more money is available for faculty compensation. The results of that negotiation could be the same, worse or better than what faculty have now. It would depend on current circumstances and the outcome of negotiation. No one can promise or guarantee how union negotiation would turn out. The administration believes that the current pay structure – approved by the faculty – is the best way to ensure the faculty are paid in a fair and equitable manner with the resources that are available in any given year. In reality, with a union, faculty may or may not receive a pay increase but will likely still be required to pay union dues.

The administration would speak for the college in bargaining over faculty issues. The MEA-MFT would bargain with the administration on all issues pertaining to workload, working conditions, benefits, and salary.

The union will do nothing to help us put a compensation plan in place. The union will not help us raise new revenue; in fact, the costs associated with the collective bargaining process will drain college resources away from educational programs.

Financial Aid
FAFSA

Completed FAFSA results must be received by the Financial Aid Office no later than February 1st annually for full consideration of Carroll College need based aid.

Verification is a process used to verify certain information on the FAFSA to ensure accuracy.  Approximately 30% of all FAFSA applicants are selected for a process called verification by the Department of Education.

In this process, Carroll College will be comparing information from the FAFSA with unaltered IRS data via the IRS Data Retrieval tool (if applicable) or copies of the student (and parent's or spouse's, if applicable) Federal tax return transcripts, W-2 forms, other financial documents, as well as educational records (if necessary). The law requires the college to verify this information before awarding Federal financial aid.  If there are differences between the FAFSA information and supplied financial documents, Carroll College will make corrections electronically and notify the student in writing.

Yes, unless the student meets Independent Student Status as defined on the FAFSA application.  The definition of dependency differs for tax filing and FAFSA filing purposes.  Dependent students are required to include parent information on the FAFSA.  Per IRS Publication 17, the IRS defines the term dependent as a qualifying child or relative.  For the FAFSA, several criteria are used to determine dependency status.  For more information visit the FAFSA website.

Yes, unless the student meets Independent Student Status as defined on the FAFSA application.

Applicants may go online to a saved FAFSA application to make corrections or the applicant may print a copy of the Student Aid Report, make corrections, sign and submit the report to the Financial Aid Office.  If the applicant is a dependent student, both the student and parent must sign the Student Aid Report.

FAFSA results are sent to the school electronically from the Department of Education.  Applicants must have the Federal School Code for Carroll College listed on the application in order for the school to receive the electronic processed results.

The IRS Data Retrieval Tool allows certain applicants who have already filed federal income tax returns to update some questions on the FAFSA by transferring data from the federal income tax return via the IRS’ database into the FAFSA.  This reduces time, effort and errors when completing the FAFSA.  It may also reduce the likelihood that an applicant’s FAFSA will be selected for verification.  If selected for verification, successful use of the IRS Data Retrieval Tool may be necessary to complete the process.  For additional information, refer to Verification Questions.  

The IRS Data Retrieval Tool can be used when filing the initial or renewal FAFSA or when making a correction. If an applicant files the FAFSA using estimated income data, the applicant can use the IRS Data Retrieval Tool after filing their federal income tax returns to update the FAFSA form. Generally, the IRS Data Retrieval Tool can be used 1-2 weeks after the federal income tax return is filed if the return is filed electronically and 6-8 weeks after filing a paper return.

It is recommended that applicants file the FAFSA as soon after October 1 as possible.

Scholarship

Private scholarship announcements and resources are listed on the Carroll College Financial Aid Scholarship page.  Students are also encouraged to check for local community scholarship opportunities. 

 Students who are enrolled full-time and have submitted FAFSA results will be put into the eligibility pool for endowed scholarships, in most instances paper applications are not required.

In most cases, endowed scholarships recipients must demonstrate financial need.  Eligibility for endowed scholarships is reviewed each year and is awarded based on the current academic year fund availability. 

Private Student Loan

It depends on the student borrower's credit, income, and the bank on whether you need a cosigner.  Freshmen are generally required to have a cosigner.

Yes, interest begins to accrue when the loan funds are disbursed to the school.

For a faster application process it is recommended to apply online. For additional loan information visit Financial Aid Offer Step 3.

The interest rate depends on the lender, loan, and credit of the borrower and/or cosigner.

Private student loans are an additional resource available to families to assist in meeting college costs. 

Most private student loan repayment begins six months after graduation or enrollment of less than 6 credits.  However, all bank are different and students should contact the lender to see when their loan repayment begins.

If considering a private student loan to assist with covering your outstanding balance, please allow up to 4-6 weeks for processing.

Aid Offer

Yes, if changes are made to the student's financial aid, a revised aid offer is sent to incoming freshman. Current students will receive an email.

Your aid offer may be affected by many factors, including changes in Federal, State, or institutional regulations, or the number of credits for which you enroll. If additional Carroll aid—for example athletic aid—is received after the initial aid offer, need-based Carroll aid may be reduced or cancelled.

If you choose to live off-campus or are granted permission to live off-campus, the following aid may be impacted:

  • Merit Scholarships for students entering Carroll fall of 2019 forward (Bishop Carroll, Presidential, Trustee, All Saints, Founders)-will be reduced by $4,000 a year ($2,000 term) if off-campus
  • Community Living Grant-will be cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Community Athletic Award-will be cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Dean's Community Living Award-will be cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Service Leadership Scholarship-current students who entered prior to fall term 2019 will have award cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Roy F. Simperman Butte Central Scholarship-will be cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Roy F. Simperman Parker School Scholarship-will be cancelled if off-campus or residing in apartments
  • Montana Catholic Room Grant-will be cancelled if not residing in Guadalupe, St. Charles or Borromeo Halls
  • Bishop Gorman Catholic Room Grant-will be cancelled if not residing in Guadalupe, St. Charles or Borromeo Halls  

If you choose to live at home with parents your room and board allowance will be adjusted to $2,540 for the year ($1,270 a semester) and your aid may be revised.

Carroll College merit scholarships, awards and need-based grants are often funded through the generosity of alumni and friends of the college.  You may be notified in the fall of a specific donor's name and then be requested to write a thank you letter to the donor. 

A student may not receive financial aid to repeat a class more than one time.  Financial aid is also not available for audit courses.

If additional Carroll need-based aid, for example athletic aid, is received after the initial aid offer, need-based Carroll grants may be reduced.

The Higher Education Act of 1965 as amended (HEA) suspends aid eligibility for students who have been convicted under federal or state law of the sale or possession of drugs, if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid.

Students must complete only the steps that apply to them.

Only first-time students are requested to qualify their aid offer.

If you are a current student you will receive an e-mail when your financial aid award is complete.  The email will provide you with instructions to go online to the Financial Aid Offer page, and select Step 1. If you are an incoming freshman you will receive an aid offer in the mail along with a cover letter. Please accept or decline each award by checking Yes or No and sign and date it at the bottom. Send the completed Award Letter back to the Financial Aid Office. Go online to to the Financial Aid Offer page, to complete additional steps as necessary as listed in the cover letter.

After the aid offer is received, students are generally provided with two weeks to review and accept their financial aid offer. However,  May 1st is the priority deadline date.

If you received notice that you need to go online to review your aid offer, this means that revisions were made to your initial Financial Aid Aid Offer and the updated offer was sent to the MyCarroll portal.

Verification

Students who have been selected for federal verification cannot have federal aid disbursed to the school until the verification process has been completed.  Failure to complete verification will result in cancellation of all federal and institutional need-based aid.

If individuals have been granted an extension, they may provide a copy of the IRS Form 4868 Application for Automatic Extension of Time to File U.S. Individual Income Tax Return or a copy of the IRS extension approval, along with copies of all W-2 forms, or if self-employed, a signed statement of their Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) and U.S. income taxes paid.  Once the tax return has been filed with the IRS, and the tax return transcript is available, Carroll may require a copy of the tax return transcript or successful use of the IRS Data Retrieval tool to re-verify any information provided.

Students will be notified of specific, acceptable documentation needed for one of five customized verification group(s), however, typical items required include:

  • Verification worksheet
  • Signed Federal Income Tax Return (student, parent and/or spouse, if applicable)
  • W-2 (from all employers) for non-tax filers

* Stipulations may apply in certain cases; therefore the Financial Aid Office will notify you of any additional documentation requirements as applicable.

All verification documents should be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid prior to the start of the semester.  Failure to do so can result in a delay in disbursing federal and institutional need-based aid.  Verification must be completed no later than 14 days prior to the end of the first semester of enrollment.  Failure to complete verification will result in the cancellation of all federal and institutional need-based aid.

Federal Work Study

Carroll College has a wide variety of student positions.  Positions are available within nearly every academic and administrative department on campus.  A number of off-campus positions with various community service organizations are also available to work study eligible students.  A list of current student job openings is available online at https://www.carroll.edu/student-employment/student-internships-jobs. Student employment applications may also be downloaded from this page.

All work-study jobs pay minimum wage.  The minimum wage is currently $8.75 per hour.

Federal work-study is awarded to students who have demonstrated financial need as a result of the FAFSA.  Students who are eligible for federal work-study will see the award listed in their financial aid package.  Work-study positions are competitive and students must apply for the jobs just like in the normal job market. Positions are limited based upon the amount of federal funding Carroll College receives each year.

Download the Carroll College Work-Study Guidelines

Work study is not credited on a student's billing statement.  Students who are employed under the Federal Work-Study program, and have completed hours during the previous month, receive a monthly paycheck which is issued on the 10th of each month.  Students who are eligible for the Federal Work-Study program generally work 10 hours per week.

Parent PLUS Loan

Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan application may be completed through links listed on the Carroll College Financial Aid Award Page (STEP 3).  Please note that students must have the processed results of the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) received by Carroll College prior to processing a Direct Parent PLUS Loan. Read and follow all instructions listed on STEP 3 to process a Federal Direct PLUS Loan.

The Federal Direct  Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is a low interest loan offered through the Federal Government.  The interest rate is a fixed 5.30% and repayment begins 60 days after funds are disbursed.  Deferment while the student is enrolled in school is available with most lenders.

Federal DirectParent PLUS Loans take approximately 2 weeks to process.  If you are in need of the funds to assist with an outstanding balance at the college, please allow for adequate processing time.

Summer School

You will need to fill out and submit the Summer School Financial Aid Withdrawal Form and submit it to the Financial Aid Office.

Summer school is funded primarily through private loan resources, unless a student is still eligible for Federal aid.

Students must first register for summer classes. If the student is eligible for aid, they will be notified by the Financial Aid Office.

NO, summer school is generally funded by private loan resources.
 

Special Circumstance

Changes in family income may be considered for review of special circumstances.  Requests must be submitted using the Special Circumstances Form along with copies of current taxes and supplemental loss of income documentation.  Special Circumstance Forms are available on the Financial Aid Forms Bank.

Excess medical expenses may be considered for review of special circumstances.  Requests must be submitted using the Special Circumstances Form along with copies of current income tax transcripts, specified medical expense documentation, and other supplemental documentation.  Medical/Dental expenses paid (not covered by insurance) that exceed 11% of the Adjusted Gross Income reported on current federal income taxes may evaluated for special circumstance review.  Special Circumstance Forms are available on the Financial Aid Forms Bank.

General Aid

Federal student aid is financial assistance through the U.S. Department of Education that is available for students enrolled in an eligible program as a regular student at a school participating in federal student aid programs.  Federal student aid covers school expenses such as tuition, fees, room and board, books, supplies, and transportation.

Enrollment deposits may not be paid using financial aid resources.

Payment in full is due August 1st for the fall semester and January 1st for the spring semester. If payment is received after the due date, a $100 late fee will be assessed. Payments for students on the 5-month payment plan are due the 1st day of each month and delinquent if not received by the 10th day. Delinquent payment plan accounts are subject to a $10 late fee.

As long as a student is attending 12 or more credits there is no change to the financial aid package.  Students dropping to 6-11 credits will no longer be eligible for Carroll aid and their Pell grant will be prorated.  Students falling below 6 credits are no longer eligible for Federal or Carroll aid.  Students dropping classes after the add/drop period will remain packaged with their original number of credits.  Dropping a class may impact the student's ability to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards, see (SAP Brochure) for guidelines.

There are three types of federal aid: Grants, Work Study, and Loans

Aid offer letters will be available depending on your admission status. For questions, please contact the Carroll Financial Aid Office at (800) 992-3648.

Students who receive loans, grants, or scholarships that are greater than the cost of tuition, fees, and room and board automatically receive a refund after the funds are applied and a credit balance over $1.00 results.  Students who choose to have a credit balance remain on their account must sign a request form in the business office.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is the minimum standards you must maintain to continue receiving financial aid funding. A complete copy of this policy is available in the Carroll College catalog. You are responsible for reading and understanding this policy.

Dropping a class may affect the amount and type of funding for which you will be eligible. The effect will depend on the date you drop the class, the aid you’ve received, and the number of credits you drop. Dropping a class may also prevent you from maintaining compliance with SAP requirements. Before dropping any class, consult the Financial Aid Office. Please note: Dropping or withdrawing from a course after the drop/add period usually has no effect on your billing statement and/or financial aid award.

Completely withdrawing from all of your classes can have many different effects on your financial aid, depending on the date of the withdrawal. You may be required to repay all or part of your financial aid, you may be ineligible to receive any future financial aid funds, and you may be placed on Financial Aid Suspension for failure to maintain compliance with SAP requirements. Before completely withdrawing from Carroll College, consult the Financial Aid Office.  See Financial Aid Office Return of Institutional and Title IV Funds Policy and Business Office Tuition and Fee Refund and Withdrawal Policy

If you fail all of your classes in one term because you stop attending, your last date of documented attendance will be determined and the effect on your financial aid will depend on that date. These effects include having to repay all or part of the financial aid that has been disbursed to you, inability to receive future financial aid until repayment has been made, and being placed on Financial Aid Suspension for failure to maintain compliance with SAP requirements. If you are in danger of failing a class or classes or wish to withdraw from the College, contact your academic advisor and consult the Financial Aid Office to determine the effect it will have on your financial aid.

A failed class may affect your ability to comply with SAP requirements. You may be placed on Financial Aid Probation or Suspension, which may affect your ability to receive financial aid in future terms. If you are in danger of failing a class or classes, contact your academic advisor and consult the Financial Aid Office to determine the effect it will have on your financial aid.

An incomplete is treated the same as other non-completion grades such as W or F. This can negatively affect your compliance with SAP requirements. If you plan to take an incomplete, consult the Financial Aid Office.

Federal regulations limit the amount of time you may be eligible to receive Federal financial aid. This limit is based on the number of credits required for your program of study. You may receive financial aid for up to 150% of those required credits. All attendance at Carroll College is included in your maximum time frame whether aid is received or not, including transfer credits. Regardless of this time frame, you must comply with all other SAP requirements.

Study Abroad

In most cases, alternative loans are the only source of funding available.  In some cases, if eligibility remains, Federal Direct Stafford Loans can be awarded.  Federal Direct Stafford Loan eligibility requires that a student be enrolled at least half-time (6 credits.)

Start at the Study Abroad Office.  Contact the Study Abroad Office to complete the required paperwork.  If you are looking at receiving Federal Financial Aid, a FAFSA application must also be on file with the Financial Aid Office.

As soon as possible.  The Study Abroad Office will forward completed paperwork to the Financial Aid Office.  Paperwork can be processes as soon as trip costs are set by the Study Abroad Office.  Do not wait until the last minute as loans take approximately 4 weeks to process.

Please notify the Financial Aid Office and request  that your financial aid be canceled for the trip expense. 

Academics
ROTC

Army ROTC Cadets are allowed to major in nearly all academic areas.

Yes. Selected Cadets may choose to serve part-time in the U.S. Army Reserve or Army National Guard while pursuing a civilian career. For more details, see: Active Duty & Army Reserve or the Army National Guard website.

Starting by exploring the Army experience from our Home Page is a great start.

  • Army ROTC Cadets have the same lifestyles and academic schedules as any other college students. They join fraternities and sororities. They participate in varsity team and individual sports. They take part in community service projects. But there are two intensive Army ROTC courses that take place on Army Posts, usually during the summer:
  • Leader's Training Course—This four-week summer course at Fort Knox, KY is ONLY for students who enroll in Army ROTC without having taken the first two years of military science classes.
  • Cadet Leadership Course—All Cadets who enter the Advanced Course must attend this four-week summer course at Fort Knox, KY between their junior and senior years.

Enrolling in Army ROTC is not, strictly speaking, "joining the Army." You will not be sent to "boot camp." However, the primary purpose of the Army ROTC program is to produce its Officers, so young adults must agree to serve as Officers in the Army after graduation in order to go through the entire program, or if they have received an ROTC scholarship. Enrolling in the ROTC Basic Course (the first two years of college) does NOT obligate someone to serve unless they have also received a scholarship. For more details, see: Service Commitment.

Army ROTC classes normally involve one elective class and one lab per semester. Although the classes involve hands-on fieldwork as well as classroom work, they are standard college classes that fit into a normal academic schedule. These courses can help students with personal and academic decision-making while giving them the tools to exercise leadership in college life, even before graduating and becoming Officers. For more details, see: Curriculum.

It depends on the Army branch the Cadet chooses and the unit to which he/she is assigned. However, Army missions and challenges are always changing, so there's no way to know in advance which specialties and units will be needed where. All Soldiers in the Army or Army Reserve face the possibility of deployment at some point during their careers. But all Soldiers are fully trained and proficient in the tasks and drills of their units. And Officers are specifically trained to make the right decisions so that missions can be carried out safely and successfully.

Army ROTC is one of the only college programs that teaches leadership. This training is invaluable for any career that involves leading, managing and motivating people or fostering teamwork. Young Army Officers are typically responsible for hundreds of Soldiers and millions of dollars in equipment; this kind of management experience can be very attractive for post-Army employers. For more details, see: About Army ROTC.

Scholarship winners must serve for four years; non-scholarship Cadets who enroll in the ROTC Advanced Course must serve for three years. All who graduate and complete ROTC training are commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Army. For more details, see: Service Commitment.

Army ROTC graduates are commissioned as U.S. Army Second Lieutenants. They then receive specialized training in one of 17 different Army branches. During their Army careers, they'll receive regular professional training as they advance through the ranks, and they'll have many opportunities for advanced leadership positions and post-graduate education.

Army ROTC offers two-, three- and four-year scholarships, which pay full tuition and fees. Carroll College graciously covers room and board at the basic rate and the scholarship includes a separate $600/semester allowance for books and a monthly stipend of $420/month. Army ROTC scholarships are not retroactive.

The Army offers a wider range of career opportunities, in more places around the world, than any other U.S. military branch.

Math

Feedback and interaction. The MMMC is designed to provide students with multiple forms of immediate feedback on their solutions. Additionally as an on-site contest, student participants have the opportunity to interact with peers from other institutions as well as observe different solution approaches presented by other teams. In brief, the MMMC differs from other contests in the following ways:

  1. All student teams work on their solutions at a regional host site.
  2. Teams have only 24 hours to prepare a solution to one of the given problems.
  3. Each team prepares a brief oral presentation of their model and a one-page summary of their results.
  4. An advisory panel reviews and provides feedback for summaries; students peer-review the oral presentations.

The Montana Math Modeling Challenge (MMMC) is a 24-hour regional modeling contest for undergraduate students. In 2008, the University of Iowa hosted the first such regional contest, (called the Midwest Mathematical Modeling Competition, or MMMC), which involved 13 teams from 5 different schools. This year, in addition to the Carroll site, regional 24-MMCs will also be held at UW-La Crosse, the University of Iowa, Shippensburg University, and the University of Rhode Island.

Honors Scholars Program

Absolutely! The Honors Scholars Program encourages all of its students to study abroad.  We will work with you to accommodate your plans!

YES! Most seminars also count as a CORE curriculum requirement, so you don’t get off track while completing this program.

Each HSP student must demonstrate intermediate competence in a foreign language. Students who meet any of the following conditions will satisfy this requirement:

  • Condition A:  Completion of 3 credits of college-level foreign language accepted by Carroll at the level of 204 or above
  • Condition B: Completion of a foreign language to the level of 102 or above and a long-term immersive study abroad experience (minimum 8 weeks); students seeking to satisfy the FL requirement through the completion of a study abroad experience must seek approval from the director of HSP
  • Condition C: A CLEP score that meets or exceeds the following standards: German-67; Spanish-68; French-69; students submitting CLEP results in other language exams must seek approval from the director of HSP
  • Condition D (waiver): This requirement shall be waived for (a) students whose language of secondary school instruction was not English or (b) students who were required to submit a TOEFL score as a condition of admission to the College; any student seeking a waiver must seek approval from the director of HSP

The process is relatively easy! We ask prospective students to provide some personal information and respond to an additional essay question.  Apply to be an Honors Scholar Now

First, all of our courses are discussion-based seminars: this means that we expect students to lead the course of discussion. Honors Scholars faculty serve as tutors in your education: we are there to prod you, guide you, and lend our expertise when necessary—but you take the leading role in your own education! Second, you move through the program with the same group of students. Every semester, your entire class moves to a different course, led by a different faculty member. As result, Honors Scholars students form lifelong friendships, based on a common experience pursuing common interests.

Carroll's Honors scholars program is a Great Books program. Over the course of six semesters, students will study the great works of Western civilization, from Homer to Freud.

Students who love to read, write about, and talk about great books are a great fit for our program. Intellectual curiosity is probably the most important attribute of the successful Honors Scholars student. While the minimum high school GPA for entrance is a 3.5, we seek especially students who want to ask big questions, and explore big ideas! 

Admission
Residence Life

Yes. The buildings are co-ed, but gender is separated differently by building. In Guadalupe Hall and St. Charles Hall, genders are divided by wing. In Borromeo Hall, the students are separated by floor. In Trinity Hall, genders are separated by room.

Yes. Students may bring cars to campus as early as their freshman year. Parking passes are $90 or $165 depending on the lot and are available on a first-come first-serve basis.

No. Carroll does not have any sanctioned fraternities or sororities.

Students are required to live on campus their first two years. First year students are housed in Guadalupe Hall and St. Charles Hall, and Sophomores are usually housed in St. Charles.

Upperclassmen may choose to live off campus although apartment style housing and apartments are available on campus for Juniors and Seniors.

Not only Carroll College but Helena, MT as a whole is an extremely safe area. To provide security for our students, all resident halls are equipped with Onity Card Key access. Our students feel secure walking around campus at any time, day or night. The campus is well-lit and there are two Emergency Intercoms available. Also, we have a contracted security company, Securitas, that patrols the grounds 24-hours a day during the week and from 3:00 PM – 7:00 AM on weekends. Students can also reach Securitas by calling 406-461-7611. For more information on campus security, click here.

Yes. There is wireless internet available in all common areas on campus and in all residence hall rooms. There is also ethernet capability in the residence hall rooms.

The beds are extra-long twins.

Students living on campus have a choice of 3 meal plans for their first year. Meal plans include a combination of "meals," which are eaten in the dining hall and "flex dollars," which are used in the café and coffee/snack shops on campus.

Unique to Carroll College, Peer Ministers are peer advisors placed in the residence halls by Campus Ministry. They work in coordination with Campus Ministry to organize events focused on Catholic life on campus, including daily masses, various spiritual retreats, and on-campus get-togethers and activities. They are also available for guidance and support to the students they live with in the halls, in a mentor role. Find out more.

An RA is a resident assistant. They are facilitators of activities, programs, fun, and learning. RA's are upperclassmen placed in the residence halls to build community on their floors, in the halls, and across campus.

Tuition and Scholarships

Merit based scholarships for first year students are renewable for four years - as long as the student is a full time student and in good academic standing. With red-shirt athletes, merit based scholarships are renewable for five years – with the same requirements for academic standing. Other Carroll College gift aid may be based on financial need, intended major, or other factors and may need to be re-evaluated each year.  Merit based scholarships for transfer students are renewable for up to six semesters (3 years) as long as the student is attending full time and is in good academic standing.

Of course! Students bring in over $900,000 to Carroll in outside scholarships annually. See how you can get in on that action.

Yes. Coaches may offer Athletic Scholarships of varying amounts to students in conjunction with Merit Scholarships.

If you can't find it at the Financial Aid website, give us a call! 1.800.992.3648 or 406.447.5425.

Carroll College is committed to offering generous academic scholarships. As part of the application to Carroll College, new incoming freshman students are automatically considered for one of our Freshman Merit Awards. These 2018-19 awards are based upon the student's cumulative high school GPA and either ACT or SAT test scores.

New Freshmen StudentsAmount
Bishop Carroll Scholarship$22,000
Presidential Scholarship$20,000
Trustee Scholarship$19,000
All Saints Award$17,000
Founders Award$15,000

Find out more »

For the majority of our institutional scholarships, the annual application deadline is December 1st.

The 2020-2021 tuition, fixed fees and room & board costs before financial aid:

 SemesterAnnual
Full Time Tuition (12-19 CREDITS)$18,091$36,182
Room and Board$5,131$10,262
Fixed Fees$540$1080
Total Direct (Billable) Charges:$23,762$47,524

Total Cost of Attendance includes allowances for Books and Supplies of $1,250, Personal Expenses of $1,700, Transportation Expenses of $1,400, and Loan Fees of $80 for a total cost of attendance of $51,904 for the year.

If you choose to live at home with parents your room and board allowance will be adjusted to $2,540 for the year ($1,270 a semester) and your aid may be revised.

Get the full breakdown of tuitions and fees here. Opportunities for financial aid and scholarships are available on our Financial Aid website.

Athletic

Plenty. The list changes each year, but last year we had intramural flag football, basketball, volleyball, indoor and outdoor soccer, racquetball, softball, ultimate frisbee, and table tennis. 

The Helena community loves coming to games and tailgating the football games. You'll frequently see the PE Center packed for basketball games and community members at softball games! Many professors and staff will come watch Carroll athletes play and bring their families. 

All regular season home games are free for Carroll students.

The Hunthausen Activity Center has a fully-equipped fitness center, weight training rooms, rooms for fitness classes, a racquetball/wallyball court, rock climbing tower, bouldering wall, and a spacious gym. Furthermore, we house outdoor recreational equipment for student use. Admission to the Hunthausen Activity Center is free to all students. Hours and more details about our workout facilities can be found on the Hunthausen Activity Center website.

Carroll College competes in the NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) Frontier Conference.

Men's Sports: Football, Soccer, Basketball, Track and Field, Cross Country, and Golf.

Women's Sports: Volleyball, Soccer, Basketball, Track and Field, Cross Country, Golf, and Softball.

About Helena/Things To Do

Besides Carroll athletics, Helena is home to the Helena Bighorns, a junior hockey club. Citizens also play in adult-league soccer, softball and football year-round.

You sure can. The Helena Regional Airport (HLN) flies to and receives flights daily from Seattle, Denver, Salt Lake and Minneapolis.

Helena's city-limit population as of 2016 was 31,169, while the greater Helena area is home to over 77,000 people.

What isn't there to do? Helena is home to several local theaters (like Grandstreet Theatre) that run productions year-round. Carroll students get discounted movie tickets at the Myrna Loy Center. The Cinemark is across the street from campus. We have a symphony orchestra, a farmer's market, and a fall art walk. Helena is home to the Archie Bray, the premier ceramics institute in the nation. Live music can be found downtown almost nightly, or catch a game from one of our minor league baseball and hockey teams. Shopping, eating, dancing — you can do it all here!

Almost anything. For hiking and mountain biking the choices are endless, Mount Helena is right near by and there are millions of acres of state and national forest surrounding Helena. Excellent rock climbing, downhill and cross-country skiing, snowboarding, fly fishing, whitewater rafting, canoeing, kayaking, water skiing, and back country camping lie within 30-60 minutes of campus.

Downtown Helena is home to stores like Sole Sisters, Base Camp, and Montana Book and Toy Company. If you're looking for chain stores, on the other side of town you'll find Costco, Macy's, Target, ShopKo, TJ Maxx, Hobby Lobby, Walmart and Ross. The bargain hunter in you might opt for Good Samaritan thrift store, or Golden Girls antique mall. We've got a little bit of everything!

Yes! Taco Del Sol, Staggering Ox, Pita Pit, LaPa Grill, Cafe Zydeco, Murray's and Firetower are great places to grab a quick lunch. For a fancy date, you might want to try On Broadway, Benny's Bistro, Silver Star, or Lucca's. For fun with friends, Bert and Ernie's, the Brewhouse, Bridge Pizza and the Windbag are popular places. But don't overlook Bullman's Pizza, Toi's Thai, Jade Garden, Mackenzie River Pizza or the Mediterranean Grill either. Helena has a lot of unique options!

Mount Helena is the closest hiking to Carroll -- the trailheads are about a ten-minute walk from campus. But within a thirty minute drive there is hiking in the Bob Marshall Wilderness, Gates of the Mountains, Grizzly Gulch -- even the south hills offer some fantastic trails.

Catholic Affiliation

No. Just over half of the students who report a religious affiliation report that they are Catholic, and the rest are students of other denominations or faiths, or non-believers. Carroll balances its Catholic tradition with also creating an environment that is welcoming to all.

No. While we offer daily Mass on campus in our various chapels and the campus center, students are not required to attend Mass, and no attendance is taken at Mass. Catholic Sacraments are an opportunity and not a requirement.

As part of our CORE requirements, Carroll students are required to take Theological Foundations and an additional theology course at Carroll, along with courses in math, history, fine arts, natural science, social science, literature, and philosophy.

Carroll College is Roman Catholic and sponsored by the Diocese of Helena. As only one of eleven Diocesan colleges in the United States, we are committed to education for lifelong ministry. Just as Gonzaga University and Seattle University are commonly referred to as “Jesuit,” Carroll and its counterparts are referred to as "Diocesan Catholic."

In addition to taking theology courses as part of the core curriculum, Carroll is committed to producing socially conscious and ethical graduates grounded in strong values. Courses and clubs provide service opportunities and we have guest speakers on moral and theological topics. Campus Ministry offers our students a supportive and welcoming environment in which they can explore and strengthen their spirituality. To learn more about our mission and Catholic identity please visit this page.

Academic

Yes. As part of our CORE requirements, all students are required to take courses in math, history, fine arts, natural science, social science, literature, philosophy, and theology, along with overlapping requirements such as "writing intensive" courses in and out of your major, and courses labeled as "national diversity" or "global diversity" courses. An example of a national diversity class is Native American Studies or American Literature, which are courses that could also satisfy social science or literature CORE requirements, respectively.

Carroll does award college credits for College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations and for higher level International Baccalaureate (IB) exams upon enrollment. Please see our AP-IB Guide for information specific to each subject test.

We do recommend that students take the essay portion of the test as we can then use that information in advising and placement, however, we do not require the essay portion of the ACT/SAT for admission.

Yes! Though Carroll College is mainly an undergraduate institution offering Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees, we are beginning to offer graduate degrees. Our first graduate program offered is the Master of Accountancy.

Yes! Carroll has a variety of education abroad opportunities, including direct exchanges with schools in Kumamoto, Japan, and Caen, France. We are also members of the International Student Exchange Program, sending students to schools in 53 countries across the globe. Go to the global education page for more information!

Carroll's internship coordinator places students in internships at Carroll, in Helena, at other locations in Montana, and across the country. Through this relevant work experience students can earn credits, invaluable experience, and connections in their field.

Yes. Fall Semester is from the end of August to December. Spring Semester is from January to May.

We don't hold specific minimum requirements for entrance. As a guideline, however, our average incoming GPA is a 3.6 and our average ACT score is a 25 (1200 SAT). We evaluate a student's entire application before making a decision, (high school transcripts, letters of recommendation, test scores, and personal statement) and there are students above and below our average marks that have convinced us that they can perform well at Carroll.

Carroll offers over 40 different majors ranging from accounting to engineering to philosophy and history. You can view a complete listing of majors here.

Students at Carroll can prepare for any number of professional schools including: Medical, Dental, Occupational Therapy, Optometry, Veterinary, Physical Therapy, Pharmacy, and Law.

You can learn more about our academic offerings here.

Yes, all first year and transfer students are considered for merit aid. First year merit scholarships are based on a combination of secondary school grades and either SAT/ACT scores or TOEFL/IELTS scores.   Transfer student scholarships are based on the grade point average at the time of transfer. Athletic scholarships are also available for qualified students.

For more information regarding international student admission, scholarships, cost of attendance and more, please go to: /admission/int/ or email Michelle Lewis at intl@carroll.edu.

Clubs and Events

A huge variety, with everything from Art, Theatre and Photography clubs to Outdoor Adventure groups to Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology clubs and other academic specialty organizations. Campus Ministry at Carroll is very active. There are political clubs such as Democrats and Republicans clubs and service clubs like Engineers Without Borders and Circle K club. Students are welcome to participate politically in Student Government, the student senate and residence hall councils. Become a reporter for the campus newspaper (Prospector) and/or submit pen prose and poetry for Carroll’s literary magazine (Colors) which are all open to students. We also have a Pep Band, Choir, Drumline, Jazz Band, and String Ensemble. If there is a club that you think our campus would benefit from, it is very easy to start a club at Carroll. 

Concerts, lectures, dances, comedians, international food festivals, a huge spring softball tournament, hayrides, just to name a few, and most are free to Carroll students. The student government, ASCC, and the student activities club, CSA sponsors free ice skating, hot springs nights, bowling nights, movie nights and coffee nights with musical entertainment both on and off campus. Home games for our sports teams rock the packed PE Center. Carroll hosts bands and the Theater typically produces four plays each academic year for the entire campus and Helena communities, with admission free or very cheap to Carroll students. Dances occurring throughout the academic year include the Barn Dance and spring Junior-Senior banquet, among others. This past year Carroll even hosted a silent disco! In addition, there are always opportunities to learn something new and exciting from a professor outside your major or a guest speaker at evening lecture events. Religious retreats, scripture study and Masses are available daily. A link to our activities calendar can be found here

Demographics
Campus Life

Public Safety and Services

Sexual Misconduct

Grievance Procedures
Carroll College's Equal Opportunity policy prohibits sexual misconduct and sexual harassment. When the college receives a report that the Equal Opportunity policy may have been violated, the report is forwarded to the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, for review. The Title IX Coordinator, also called the Equal Opportunity Officer, or "EO," will meet with the reporting student and explain the informal and formal processes available and the confidentiality provisions described in the Equal Opportunity Grievance Procedure. The Title IX Coordinator will also explain that retaliation against the student for bringing his or her concerns forward is prohibited and will discuss interim measures that can be taken to protect the student pending the resolution of his or her complaint. The Title IX Coordinator will promptly  investigate to determine what occurred.

The Equal Opportunity Grievance Procedure describes this process in more detail and can be found at LINK.

Offer support

If someone comes to you for help, recognize that he or she might be struggling with painful feelings--anger, fear, denial, or embarrassment. Provide support and give assurance that campus resources are available to help. Offer to assist in accessing college resources such as the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, Borromeo Hall 130, (406) 447-4530; Counseling Services staff, in the Wellness Center, lower level of Guad Hall, (406) 447-5441; or the Victim Advocate, The Friendship Center, 1430 N Sanders St, Helena, (406) 442-6800, officem@thefriendshipcenter.org.

Maintain confidentiality

Maintain an appropriate level of discretion in all of your interactions with others. Campus employees may not guarantee confidentiality, because they are obligated by college policy and federal law to report information about sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay. However, communications about a student with persons other than college officials authorized to receive such information, including family members or friends, cannot occur without prior written permission of the student. 

Important Notice
If you are a Carroll College employee, you must inform the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, about any reports you receive about sexual misconduct involving students. The Title IX Coordinator will contact the victim with information about supportive resources and the college investigative process. If the victim does not want to be contacted by the Title IX Coordinator, the Title IX Coordinator will work with you to ensure that the victim knows about available resources. Employees who are exempt from the reporting requirement include licensed healthcare professionals, priests who receive information under the seal of confession, and victim advocates.

Inform the victim of available resources and reporting options

  • Counseling Services staff, (406) 447-5441, provide free and confidential counseling and crisis intervention to student survivors of sexual and relationship violence, as well as support and information for their family and friends. Counselors are willing to work with students at all stages of recovery, from initial crisis-intervention to healing. Counseling Services staff are dedicated to working to remove barriers that keep individuals from seeking services and informing survivors of all of their options while supporting them to make whatever decision are right for the individual. 
  • Health Services staff, (406) 447-5441, provide free and confidential information to student survivors of sexual and relationship violence to understand the physical and medical trauma. Health Services staff are willing to work with students to refer to medical resources in the Helena community. Health Services staff offer the services of a nurse practitioner who conducts a weekly clinic on campus--typically each Tuesday. 
  • The Friendship Center staff, (406) 442-6800, offer specially trained staff who meet clients/assault victims at a private, off-campus location. Friendship Center staff provide on-site access to community advocate, medical assistance and law enforcement as requested. St. Peter's Hospital Emergency Room, (406) 447-2684, is available to collect DNA evidence up to five (5) days after a sexual assault but it is most likely to yield positive results the sooner it is collected. Evidence can be stored up to a year while a survivor decides whether to pursue criminal charges. 
  • Helena Police officers, 911 (or 9-911 from a campus phone) for emergencies and (406) 442-3233 for non-emergencies, are available 24 hours a day to respond to calls about sexual assaults. In cases of sexual assaults, officers can explain the options for medical exams, counseling, advocacy, and reporting assaults as crimes; officers will ask if the survivors want advocates present to help them understand the proceedings. Helena Police is responsible for all criminal investigations and can answer questions about the legal process. 
  • Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, (406) 447-4530, must be informed about the incident in order for the college to appropriately respond to instances of sexual misconduct involving students. The Title IX Coordinator will help with interim measures to ensure that a student is safe on campus and obtains any assistance needed to ensure continued productive access to educational programs. The Title IX Coordinator will also provide additional information about options for pursuing a college complaints against a student or employee, as well as options for reporting to local law enforcement. 

Contact the Title IX Coordinator if you need more information

The Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, (406) 447-4530, or jhay@carroll.edu, can assist you in helping and supporting the victim. If you are unsure how to proceed, please contact the Title IX Coordinator for guidance

1. Get help

Go to a safe place. If you need emergency medical care, go to the St. Peter's Hospital Emergency Room, 2475 Broadway, 406-0447-2684. If you need medical assistance, go to the Wellness Center 406-447-5441, located in the lower level of Guad Hall. Contact the college's Victim Advocate, Chelsea Nottingham, The Friendship Center, 406-442-6800, 1430 N. Sanders, Helena. Chelsea also holds on-campus office hours in St. Charles Hall, Room 108, each 1st and 3rd Monday from 10:00 a.m. - noon.  Assistance from staff from Counseling Services 406-447-5441; Residence Life 406-447-4378; or Campus Ministry 406-447-4689 is also available. For weekday or weekend support--including after-hours--contact the on-call Residence Life phone at 406-459-0540.

2. Report to police
Call 911 calling from a campus phone). The non-emergency phone number for Helena Police is 406-442-3233. Calling law enforcement does not obligate you to file a police report, although you may do so if you decide to. The police can provide immediate response for your protection, help you obtain medical care, and arrange to have a meeting for you with victim advocate services. They can also provide information regarding the importance of preserving evidence that may be necessary to the proof of a sexual crime.

3. Report to campus authorities
Contact the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, Borromeo Hall, 406-447-4530; Dean of Students and Retention, Beth Groman, Borromeo Hall, 406-447-4530; or Assistant Director of Residence Life, Annette Walstad, Borromeo Hall, 406-447-5509. If these individuals are not available, you may also tell a trusted faculty or staff member, who will work with the Title IX Coordinator to provide you with support and resources. Most college employees, including student employees, are required to report information they receive about allegations of sex-based discrimination, sexual harassment, and sexual misconduct involving students to the Title IX Coordinator within 24 hours of receiving the information. Employees who are exempt from this reporting requirement include licensed  healthcare professionals, priests who receive information under the seal of confession, and victim advocates. Reporting to campus authorities is not the same as reporting to the police; the college process is an administrative proceeding, not a criminal proceeding.

To ensure your safety on campus, the college can rearrange class schedules, living situations, transportation, and working situations as well as support no-contact orders. The college can also explain the process for pursuing a complaint through Carroll's Equal Opportunity Grievance Procedure. Even if you chose not to report an assault to law enforcement, you have the right to continue your education in an environment free from the effects of sexual violence, including any ongoing harassment.

4. Find support
Counseling Services in the Wellness Center (located in the lower level of Guad Hall) provides confidential on-campus support for victims of sexual assault. Call 406-447-5441 to schedule an appointment. For housing assistance, please contact the Assistant Director of Residence Life, E Annette Walstad, at 406-447-5509 or awalstad@carroll.edu. For academic assistance, please contact Cheri Long, the Director of Academic Advising and Support Services, 406-447-5434, chlong@carroll.edu . Changes to academic, living, transportation, and working situations may be made if requested by the victim and if such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to the college or local law enforcement.

Report stalking to police
Call 911 (or 9-911 if calling from a campus phone). The non-emergency phone number for Helena Police is (406) 442-3233. Calling law enforcement does not obligate you to file a police report, although you may do so if you decide to. The police can provide immediate response for your protection and arrange a meeting for you with victim advocate services. 

Report to campus authorities
If someone has stalked you, contact the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, 130 Borromeo Hall, (406)447-4530, jhay@carroll.edu or the Assistant Director of Residence Life; or, Emily Weideman, Borromeo Hall, at (406) 447-5509, eweideman@carroll.edu. The college will promptly investigate to determine what occurred and then take appropriate measures to resolve the situation.

Campus resources
To ensure your safety on campus, the college can rearrange class schedules, support no-contact orders, or pursue Code of Student Conduct proceedings. Contact the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, 130 Borromeo Hall, (406)447-4530, jhay@carroll.edu​​​​​​​ or the Director of Community Living, Maureen Ward, O'Connell Hall 207, (406) 447-4378. Counseling Services provides on-campus support for victims of stalking. Call (406) 447-5441 to schedule an appointment.

1. Get to a safe place
Contact the Friendship Center, (406) 442-6800, which assists individuals and families of domestic and dating violence and sexual misconduct gain access to community services and resources which provide the assistance they need to resolve their crisis and begin to rebuild their lives. Services provides include: emergency housing, counseling, domestic violence and sexual assault survivor groups, case management, sexual assault outreach program, crime victim advocate program, 24-hour crisis line, order of protection assistance, or legal advocacy. 

2. Get help
If you need emergency medical care, go to the St. Peter's Hospital Emergency Room, 2475 Broadway, (406) 447-2684. If you need medical assistance, go to the Wellness Center, (406) 447-5441, located in the lower level of Guad Hall. Contact the college's Victim Advocate, Kelly Parsley, (406) 447-4523. Seek out assistance from staff from Counseling Services (406) 447-5441, Residence Life, (406) 447-4378, or Campus Ministry (406) 447-4689. For weekday or weekend support--including after-hours--contact the on-call Assistant Director of Community Living at (406) 459-0540.

3. Report to police
Call 911 (or 9-911 if calling from a campus phone). The non-emergency phone number for Helena Police is (406) 442-3233. Calling law enforcement does not obligate you to file a police report, although you may do so if you decide to. The police can provide immediate response for your protection, help you obtain medical care, and arrange a meeting for you with victim advocate services. 

4. Report to campus authorities

Contact the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, Borromeo Hall 130, (406) 447-4530; Vice President for Student Life, Dr. Jim Hardwick, O'Connell Hall 211, (406) 447-4530; or Director of Community Living, Emily Weideman, Borromeo Hall, 406-447-5509 . If these individuals are not available, you may also tell a trusted faculty or staff member, who will work with the Title IX Coordinator to provide you with support and resources. Most college employees, including student employees, are required to report information they receive about allegations of dating violence or domestic violence involving students to the Title IX Coordinator within 24 hours of receiving the information. Employees who are exempt from this requirement included licensed healthcare professionals, priests who receive information under the seal of confession, and victim advocates. Reporting to campus authorities is not the same as reporting to the police; the college process is an administrative proceeding, not a criminal proceeding.

5. Find support
Counseling Services staff in the Wellness Center provide confidential on-campus support for victims of dating violence or domestic violence. Call (406) 447-5441 to schedule an appointment. For housing assistance, please contact the Assistant Director of Community Living, Emily Weideman at (406) 447-5509 or eweideman@carroll.edu. For academic assistance, please contact the Director of Academic Advising and Support Services, Annette Walstad, (406) 447-5434, awalstad@carroll.edu. Changes to academic, living, transportation, and working situations may be made if requested by the victim and if such accommodations are reasonably available, regardless of whether the victim chooses to report the crime to the college or local law enforcement. 

Report to campus authorities
If someone has sexually harassed youcontact the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, Borromeo Hall 130, (406) 447-4530, jhay@carroll.edu; or the Director of Community Living, Maureen Ward, O'Connell Hall 207, (406) 447-4378. You may also tell a trusted faculty or staff member, who will work with the Title IX Coordinator to provide you with support and resources. Most college employees, including student employees, are required to report information they receive about allegations of sex-based discrimination and sexual harassment to the Title IX Coordinator within 24 hours of receiving the information. Employees who are exempt from this reporting requirement include licensed healthcare professionals, priests who receive information under the seal of confession, and victim advocates.

The Title IX Coordinator can explain the process for pursuing a complaint of sexual harassment through Carroll's Equal Opportunity Grievance Procedure, including informal and formal processes, the fact-finding that might be necessary, confidentiality, and the college's prohibition on retaliation for reporting sexual harassment. Regardless of whether you wish to pursue a sexual harassment report formally or informally, the college can work with you to rearrange class schedules, living situations, transportation, and working situations as well as support no-contact orders. 

Additional information regarding sexual harassment and how the college handles reports of such conduct can be found at the following links: Equal Opportunity Policy; Equal Opportunity Grievance Policy. 

After a complaint of sexual misconduct has been filed with the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, (406) 447-4530, or jhay@carroll.edu, the Title IX Coordinator or a designee will investigate the incident in accordance with the college's Equal Opportunity Grievance Procedure. You will be notified of the accusation against you and provided with the opportunity to respond. The official conducting the investigation will explain the procedures, and your rights and options.

Students and employees who are accused of committing sexual misconduct can still receive the support of Counseling Services, Health Services and Campus Ministry personnel. Employees are able to use the Employee Assistance Program as part of their employee benefits.

College disciplinary proceedings may be instituted against a student or employee accused of conduct that potentially violates both the criminal law and college policy--the Carroll Code of Student Conduct for students and the employee handbook for employees--that is, if both possible violations result from the same factual situation. Proceeding under the Carroll Code may be carried out prior to, simultaneously with, or following civil or criminal proceedings at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Life. Students and other members of the college community may also file a request with a court for a restraining order of protection against the accused student or employee.

Determination made or sanctions imposed under the Carroll Code are not subject to change because criminal charges arising out of the same facts are dismissed, reduced, or resolved in favor of or against the criminal law defendant.

When a student or employee is charged by federal, state, or local authorities with a violation of the law, the college will not request or agree to special consideration for that individual because of his or her status as a student or employee. 

If a complaint of sexual misconduct is reported to the Title IX Coordinator, Judy Hay, (406) 447-4530, or jhay@carroll.edu, the college has an obligation to review the matter to (a) determine if there is a preponderance of evidence to demonstrate a violation of policy has occurred, (b) to administer appropriate sanctions, if any violation of policy has occurred, including but not limited to termination of enrollment and/or employment, and (c) to ensure that the campus community can continue to work and learn in an environment free from unlawful harassment, intimidation, or violence. This is an administrative procedure, not a criminal procedure.

If a victim chooses to file a complaint through the Helena Police Department, 911 (or 9-911 if calling from a campus phone) or (406) 442-3233, or the Lewis and Clark County Sheriff's Office, (406) 447-8235 weekday, business hours, or (406) 442-7883 on weekends or after business hours, the process is governed by Montana criminal law. The standard of evidence necessary to convict a defendant of a crime is "beyond a reasonable doubt." This is a criminal procedure.

A victim can pursue a campus administrative complaint, criminal charges through local law enforcement, or both. 

"Sexual misconduct" is a non-legal term encompassing a variety of different behaviors, including from sexual assault, sexual exploitation, stalking, relationship violence, and inducing incapacitation for sexual purposes. Using this term serves to differentiate campus processes, which are administrative and educational, from the criminal justice system, in which people are charged with crimes that carry criminal penalties. Additional information about "sexual misconduct" can be found in Carroll's Equal Opportunity policy LINK.

Yes, the college may discipline students for sexual misconduct and sexual harassment as outlined in college policy. The college disciplinary process is unrelated to any criminal procedure. An important difference to keep in mind is that the burden of proof in a criminal proceeding is "beyond a reasonable doubt," whereas the burden of proof for sexual misconduct and sexual harassment in a college proceeding is "preponderance of the evidence."

According to the research, 3 to 6 percent of college-aged men admit to having completed or attempted a sexual assault. Of that 3 to 6 percent, 67 percent have completed or attempted multiple sexual assaults. The average number of victims varied by study from 6.2 to 14. If you have been assaulted by someone, it is statistically likely that the same perpetrator has assaulted or will assault another person. 

Carroll College
COVID-19

Vaccines

While Carroll is not requiring students to be vaccinated for COVID-19, we strongly recommend that all students and members of the campus community get the vaccine while it is free and widely available this summer. More people vaccinated will keep our campus community safer and means fewer chances for the virus to spread.

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines protect against getting sick from COVID-19 and provide significant protection against serious illness and death from COVID-19. So far, studies suggest that the currently-authorized vaccines still provide protection against variants such as the Delta variant.

Protecting yourself also helps protect the people around you, like those at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 or those who can’t get vaccinated — including infants, or people with weakened immune systems from things like chemotherapy for cancer.

All authorized COVID-19 vaccines provide significant protection from serious illness and hospitalization. Getting vaccinated against COVID-19 and following CDC’s recommendations to protect yourself and others will offer the best protection from COVID-19.

The Moderna vaccine is recommended for people aged 18+ and includes 2 shots spaced 28 days apart. It is a messenger RNA, or mRNA, vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Moderna vaccine provides significant protection against serious illness.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is recommended for people aged 12+ and includes 2 shots spaced 21 days apart. It is an mRNA vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine provides significant protection against serious illness.

The Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine is delivered in one shot only. It is a viral vector vaccine. Based on evidence from clinical trials, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine also provides significant protection against serious illness. Health officials are closely monitoring all vaccines for safety, including the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Having multiple types of vaccines available is crucial so that vaccination programs can quickly reach as many people as possible.

The Delta variant is a naturally occurring mutation of the SARS CoV-2 virus, the virus that causes COVID-19. Data show that the delta variant is more contagious and spreads more easily than the original COVID-19 virus. The delta variant accounts for a growing proportion of new coronavirus cases across the U.S., and people infected with the delta variant are more likely to need hospitalization than those infected with earlier strains of the virus.

Researchers say the Delta variant is 50 percent more contagious than the Alpha variant (which was first identified in the U.K.). In addition, a person with the Delta variant can spread it to more people than the original coronavirus strain (from 2.5 people with the original strain to 3.5 or 4, with Delta.) 

Please go to the CDC's COVID Data Tracker to check the level of community transmission in the United States, including Lewis and Clark County.

Lewis and Clark County is currently listed as an area of high community transmission, according to CDC data at this time.

Based on CDC guidance, LCPH recommends that all residents wear masks/face coverings when in public indoor spaces – regardless of their vaccination status.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

The vaccine is not a cure but it is a layer of protection up to 95%. The vaccine helps to prevent you from developing severe symptoms from the virus and also reduces the risks of you spreading the virus.

More than 150 million people in the United States, including 96% of medical doctors, are now fully vaccinated against COVID-19, and these vaccines have undergone the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.

Vaccines are authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which sets strict standards for clinical trials and rigorously evaluates scientific data submitted by vaccine developers. Once vaccines are made available to the public, the FDA continues to monitor vaccines very closely for safety.

Researchers began developing vaccines for COVID-19 in January 2020, based on decades of understanding immune response and how vaccines work. Thousands of volunteers participated in clinical trials that started that spring, making sure we can trust the vaccines to be safe and effective.

Based on the results, the FDA has authorized multiple vaccines for public use. In December 2020, the FDA authorized two versions of COVID-19 vaccines (Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech) for the American public. A third (Johnson & Johnson) was added in February 2021 and is currently available for use in the United States after a pause in April 2021. Doctors and medical experts with many years of experience regulating vaccines evaluated information about the safety, effectiveness, and manufacturing quality of the vaccines prior to making their decision.

After a vaccine is authorized by the FDA and made available to the public, experts continue to closely monitor the vaccines for ongoing safety and to help us learn more about questions like how long vaccines will provide protection.

Yes, you should be vaccinated regardless of whether you already had COVID-19. That’s because experts do not yet know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. Even if you have already recovered from COVID-19, it is possible—although rare—that you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 again. Studies have shown that vaccination provides a strong boost in protection in people who have recovered from COVID-19. Learn more about why getting vaccinated is a safer way to build protection than getting infected.

If you were treated for COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma, you should wait 90 days before getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure what treatments you received or if you have more questions about getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Serious side effects that would cause a long-term health problem are extremely unlikely following COVID-19 vaccination.

Long-term side effects following any vaccination are extremely rare. Vaccine monitoring has historically shown that if side effects are going to happen, they generally happen within six weeks of receiving a vaccine dose.

For this reason, the Food and Drug Administration required each of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines to be studied for at least eight weeks after the final dose. Millions of people have received COVID-19 vaccines, and no long-term side effects have been detected.

CDC recommends that everyone age 12 and older in the United States get vaccinated against COVID-19 as soon as they can. Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping people from getting COVID-19. Getting a COVID-19 vaccine will also help keep people from getting seriously ill even if they do get COVID-19.

Although most people who contract COVID-19 get better within weeks to months of illness, some do not. CDC and experts around the world are working to learn more about short- and long-term health effects associated with COVID-19, who gets them, and why. People with long COVID report experiencing different combinations of symptoms such as tiredness or fatigue, difficulty thinking or concentrating (sometimes referred to as “brain fog”), headache, difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, or loss of smell or taste.

None of the authorized COVID-19 vaccines in the United States contain the live virus that causes COVID-19. This means that a COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. Sometimes this process can cause symptoms, such as fever. These symptoms are normal and are signs that the body is building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work.

COVID-19 vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Both mRNA and viral vector COVID-19 vaccines deliver instructions (genetic material) to our cells to start building protection against the virus that causes COVID-19. However, the material never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept.

Learn more about mRNA and​ viral vector COVID-19 vaccines.

HB 702

The Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DOL) guidance states:

House Bill 702 (“HB 702”) was passed by the 2021 Montana Legislature and became effective when signed by Governor Gianforte on May 7, 2021. The law prohibits discrimination based on vaccination status or having an immunity passport.

The law will be published as part of the Montana Human Rights Act in Title 49, chapter 2, part 3 of the Montana Code Annotated.

Prior to enactment of HB 702, the Montana Human Rights Act generally prohibited discrimination based on “race, creed, religion, color, sex, physical or mental disability, age, or national origin.”  See Mont. Code Ann. § 49-1-102. Carroll College’s understanding is that HB 702 effectively adds “vaccination status” to that list of prohibited forms of discrimination in Montana.

Compliance with state and federal laws is critically important to Carroll College. Carroll is working hard to fully understand, and comply with, this new area of law. At present, Carroll College’s understanding is that HB 702 does place some limitations on the college’s public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Carroll College’s goal is to balance public health guidance with its obligation to comply with HB 702.

Because HB 702 is so new, Carroll College anticipates its understanding of the law may change over time as Montana’s courts interpret and apply it. The Montana Department of Labor & Industry (DOL) has issued initial guidance interpreting HB 702.

In this FAQ section, Carroll College has drafted FAQs which highlight DOL guidance and detail how Carroll College plans to address HB 702 this year. It is likely this guidance will evolve over time.

It is unclear whether Carroll College can require students to receive COVID-19 vaccines as a condition of attendance at Carroll College. Carroll College is not aware of any Montana school, outside of the tribal colleges, that is requiring COVID-19 vaccines for students, which confirms the lack of clarity on this issue. Carroll College will closely follow legal developments on HB 702. Again, this is a rapidly changing area of law in Montana.

Although Carroll College is not requiring Carroll College students to obtain a COVID-19 vaccine at this time, Carroll College strongly encourages all students to obtain a COVID-19 vaccine if they are medically able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s vaccination recommendations.

No. At present, Carroll College’s understanding is that it cannot require faculty, staff, or campus visitors to receive a COVID-19 vaccine under HB 702. Carroll College strongly encourages all faculty and staff to receive a COVID-19 vaccine if they are medically able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s vaccination recommendations.

The DOL guidance states: 

Nothing in the language of HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from asking about vaccination status or whether you have an immunity passport. However, if asked, a person is not required to respond and may not be discriminated against for failing to respond.

Carroll College students already provide vaccination information to the Carroll College Wellness Center. At present, Carroll College’s intention is to treat students’ COVID-19 vaccination status the same as other vaccination records. Consistent with past practices, a limited number of Carroll College personnel may ask you whether you have received the COVID-19 vaccine, including: (i) Carroll College Wellness Center staff will ask all students for their Carroll College COVID-19 vaccination status; (ii) the Carroll College Athletic Department may ask Carroll College student-athletes for their COVID-19 vaccination status; and (iii) the Carroll College Nursing Department may ask nursing students for their COVID-19 vaccination status.

Please note that, according to the DOL guidance, Carroll College students are “not required to respond” to any questions about their vaccination status. Carroll College will not discriminate against students regardless of how they respond to questions about their vaccination status.

The DOL guidance states: 

Nothing in the language of HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from asking about vaccination status or whether you have an immunity passport. However, if asked, a person is not required to respond and may not be discriminated against for failing to respond.

Although HB 702 does not prohibit Carroll College from asking its employees about their vaccination status, at this time Carroll College only anticipates authorizing members of the Carroll College Human Resource Office to collect this information from faculty and staff. Please note that faculty and staff are not required to respond to these requests, and Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone based on their response to requests regarding vaccination status.

The DOL guidance states:

Yes. Nothing in HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, or public accommodation from asking or suggesting you wear a mask.

Carroll College strongly recommends all members of the Carroll College campus community wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic if they are able to do so. Please note that Carroll College will not discriminate against anyone who declines to follow Carroll College’s masking recommendations.

No. The DOL guidance makes it clear that mask policies must apply equally to “everyone . . . regardless of vaccination status.”  Carroll College representatives are not authorized to direct or request that only unvaccinated students wear masks.

Carroll College’s understanding is that it can require or recommend that students, faculty, and staff be tested for COVID-19, provided that it does so irrespective of their vaccination status. HB 702 does not appear to reference testing for COVID-19, or otherwise limit testing requirements or recommendations.

The DOL guidance states:

Nothing in HB 702 prohibits a person, governmental entity, public accommodation, or employer from offering incentives to persons to voluntarily become vaccinated as long as the nature of the incentive is not discriminatory (not so substantial as to be coercive.)

Carroll College plans on offering students various de minimis incentives to receive COVID-19 vaccines, including as part of Carroll College’s 2021 Orientation.

Wellness & Health Services

Testing times:

Sunday, August 22: 9 am - 1 pm

Monday, August 23: 8 am - 3 pm 

Location: on the Borromeo lawn. 

Free acai berry bowls for the first 250 tested each day! Aasved Acai on Sunday from 9-12 and Mountain Berry Bowls on Monday from 12-3.

Last spring’s entry process was successful and we will be repeating some of these procedures, including campus-wide testing of all students as they return to campus. Carroll College is continuing our arrangement with Shodair Children's Hospital in providing COVID-19 tests. As was done in the spring, we will be using the saliva method for testing this fall semester. SalivaDirect, developed by the Yale School of Public Health, is easier to administer, provides faster results and is comparable in accuracy to nasal swab tests. Test results are available in 24 to 48 hours.  

This protocol is intended for the collection of the normal saliva that naturally pools into the mouth. No coughing or sniffing prior to sample collection is required. Water should be avoided 10 minutes prior to collection. Other drinks, food, and nasal sprays should be avoided for 30 minutes before sample collection.

Students that have been COVID positive within the last 90 days, do not need to test. Students who will not be testing need to email Covid19@carroll.edu. Once the 90 days is expired, testing should resume.

Students who have been vaccinated still do need to test.  

The Wellness Center is testing asymptomatic students, faculty and staff on Mondays and Tuesdays from 9 am - 11 am, no appointment necessary.
 
Students, faculty or staff who are contacts of a COVID-19 positive case or have symptoms need to call the Wellness Center at 406-447-5441 for an appointment and testing can be done Monday through Friday 9 am - 11 am, when classes are in session.
 
All COVID-19 testing is FREE.

Carroll College has once again partnered with Shodair Children's Hospital in Helena for COVID testing this fall.  With its medical genetics expertise, infrastructure and facilities,  Shodair was approved to use the "SalivaDirect" method for testing that was developed by the Yale Public School of Health. Results show that SalivaDirect is highly sensitive and is accurate 94% of the time, comparable to results for nasopharyngeal swab-based tests (used last fall at Carroll).

The Yale School of Public Health shared the following information about SalivaDirect: 

How  is SalivaDirect different from other testing methods?

In addition to being less expensive, SalivaDirect offers a number of other advantages. They include:

  • It is non-invasive. SalivaDirect requires only a small sample of saliva as opposed to the standard nasopharyngeal (NP) swab. The NP method requires what is essentially a long Q-tip that is inserted deep into the nostril and then rotated.
  • It is quick and safe. Because SalivaDirect only requires a small saliva sample, the time requirement for an individual is minimal, even less than a minute. People basically have to spit into a small container. The procedure is safer in that there is less risk of exposure to health care workers collecting the samples.
  • It is accurate. Results show that SalivaDirect is highly sensitive and is accurate 94% of the time, comparable to results for NP-based tests.

Students & Employees –if you are COVID-19 positive:

Lewis & Clark Public Health, your healthcare provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center will directly contact anyone who has been tested and is confirmed positive for COVID-19.

If you have tested positive, all students and employees should take the following steps:

  • Fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form.
  • Students – If the call comes from Lewis & Clark Public Health, contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report your positive case. If you live on campus, immediately contact Residential Life & Housing at 406.459.0540 so they can facilitate your move into isolation. Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. that you have tested positive and that you will not be attending class/work/practice.
  • Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are COVID-19 positive and will not be attending work.
  • If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at 406.442.2480.
  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider, except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas.
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home - stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

Returning to normal activity: You can return to normal activity according to the CDC Guidelines with others after:

    • At least 10 days since symptoms first appeared AND;
    • At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication AND;
    • Symptoms have improved (Please note:  Loss of taste or smell may persist for weeks or months after recovery and will not have to delay the end of isolation).
    • If you had no symptoms at the time of testing, you can return to normal activity 10 days after your COVID-19 test date as long as you remain asymptomatic.

If You Are Exposed to someone with a Suspected or CONFIRMED POSITIVE COVID Test:

Lewis & Clark Public Health or a college representative will directly contact anyone who has been identified as having been exposed to someone with a suspected or confirmed positive COVID-19 case. 

Close Contact – Under CDC guidelines, a close contact is defined as “someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinically compatible illness) for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period.” 

NOTE:  The COVID Active Case Action Team (CACAT) will review all new pertinent county and campus COVID-19 infection data on a daily basis.  The college reserves the right to update these policies at any time.

  • A close contact is considered asymptomatic if they do not have any of the following symptoms: (i) fever or chills; (ii) cough; (iii) shortness of breath or difficulty breathing (iv) fatigue; (v) muscle or body aches; (vi) headache; (vii) new loss of taste or smell; (viii) sore throat; (ix) congestion or runny nose; (x) nausea or vomiting; or (xi) diarrhea.
  • If you are a Carroll College student or employee and have been exposed to someone with a suspected or confirmed positive COVID-19 test, we will be treating all close asymptomatic contacts the same (Carroll’s policies for asymptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status). 


1.    Carroll College has established the following policies for asymptomatic close contacts:  

a.             Carroll College highly recommends that students consider self-isolating until a negative test result is received.

b.             Close contacts may be identified by the COVID-19 positive individual through the COVID-19 Reporting Form

c.              If you are a confirmed close contact, you must also fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form

d.             The CACAT will track all positive cases and close contacts and will be in communication with each impacted individual. 

e.             Roommates will automatically be considered close contacts.  

f.               All close contacts will be required to wear a mask whenever in a communal space or in the presence of any other individual on Carroll’s campus for 10 full days after the date of exposure even after a negative test result is received.   

g.              All close contacts will be required to test three (3) days after the date of exposure.  If the 3rd day falls on a weekend or holiday, then the testing must take place immediately following the weekend or holiday.

 i.  Carroll offers asymptomatic and symptomatic testing Monday through Friday excluding weekends and holidays. Please call 406-447-5441 to make an appointment for testing.

ii.  A Public Health officer or College representative can help provide information about testing, or you may work with your healthcare provider. The Carroll College Wellness Center may be able to provide some general guidance as well by calling 406.447.5441.

h.             The CACAT team will monitor the 3-day testing period and will send students a notification reminder that they must test in accordance with 1.g. 

i.               Asymptomatic close contacts will not be quarantined unless they violate the testing requirements under sub-bullet 1.g.  

j.               The Student Life team will be informed if a student does not test within the 3-day testing period to launch the student conduct process.   

k.              If asymptomatic close contact students do not test on day 3 or if they fail to wear a mask as required above, this will be considered a student conduct issue at which time the student will go through the Student Conduct process in which the first step is to automatically place the student in quarantine. If the student fails to abide by the quarantine requirement, further sanctions may be warranted.  

l.               All asymptomatic close contacts must monitor themselves for COVID-19 symptoms for 14 days after learning of their status as a confirmed close contact.  If an asymptomatic close contact develops any COVID-19 symptoms, they must immediately report those symptoms to the Carroll College Wellness Center and take an additional COVID-19 test. 

2.             If you are a close contact and develop symptoms you must follow the protocols under the section above titled “What To Do If You are Ill,” including Isolating yourself if you receive a positive COVID-19 test result, consistent with Carroll College’s confirmed COVID-19 policies.  (Carroll’s policies for symptomatic close contacts will not differ based on vaccination or immunity status.)

a.             Students – If the call comes from Lewis & Clark Public Health, contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report your symptoms and/or confirmed positive test, if applicable.  If you live on campus, immediately contact Residential Life & Housing at 406.459.0540 so they can facilitate your move into isolation. Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. that you are a confirmed contact and that you will not be attending class/work/practice. 

b.             Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are a confirmed contact and will not be attending work.

c.              If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at 406.442.2480.

d.             Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare provider except to get medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas. 

e.             Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.

f.               Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.

g.              Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home - stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

h.             If you become symptomatic, please refer to “What to Do If You Are Ill”.

If you are experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms, immediately call your primary healthcare provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 - do not go to the center before calling first. After assessing your symptoms, your healthcare provider or the Wellness Center may order a COVID-19 test. You will be contacted directly for instructions on how to receive a COVID test. These policies apply regardless of your vaccination status.

  • Until test results are obtained – immediately self-quarantine and please adhere to the following protocols:
    • Students – Contact the Wellness Center at 406.447.5441 to report that you have been tested and determine the best course of action.
    • Notify your faculty members, supervisors, coaches, etc. to report that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not be attending class/work/practice.
    • You will be required to self-quarantine until your test results come back.
    • Employees: Contact your supervisor to report that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not be attending work- immediately self-quarantine.
    • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider.
    • You will be required to self-quarantine until your test results come back.  
  • When test results are obtained:
    • An interviewer from Lewis & Clark Public Health or your healthcare provider will contact you if you test positive for COVID-19. 
    • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, the interviewer or healthcare provider will help you understand what to do next, what support is available, as well as let you know how long you should isolate yourself.

We have worked with Lewis & Clark Public Health to develop the following guidelines for when a student tests positive for Covid-19:

  • If a student has symptoms of COVID-19, they should remain in their room or remain off campus and contact the Wellness Center. If faculty and staff have symptoms of COVID-19, they should remain off campus and contact their healthcare provider.
  • If a student is notified by Public Health that they are a known contact of a COVID-19 positive individual or are COVID-19 positive themselves, they must report that to Student Life.
  • If a student suspects they have COVID-19, our health service can order a test right away at a local healthcare provider.
  • If a student living on campus suspects they have COVID-19 or has had contact with a known COVID-19 carrier and needs to isolate themselves, we have space set aside for those students.
  • If a student is diagnosed with COVID-19, we have space set aside to isolate that student, make sure their needs are met, and quarantine any known contacts. Carroll staff will  contact roommates and work with the student to identify close contacts immediately, and we will continue to work with Public Health contact tracers as their capacity allows.  
  • Students who are isolated or quarantined will be able to continue their coursework remotely.
  • Due to FERPA and HIPAA, we cannot release any information about a student's health and therefore will not be releasing personal information including age, gender, place of residence, or what programs they are involved in. However, when the college is in session, we are publishing a weekly prevalence report on Fridays of COVID-19 positive cases in the Carroll community. The report can be found on the homepage of the Marching Forward website.

Isolation: As defined by Lewis and Clark County Public Health, “Isolation refers to separating people who are sick from those who are not sick.”For the purposes of the Marching Back plan isolation refers to the plan to move individuals with confirmed cases of Covid-19 into separate living arrangements where they can recover and not infect others.

Quarantine: As defined by Lewis and Clark County Public Health, “Quarantine refers to separating people who are, or may have been, exposed to COVID-19, but are not showing signs of illness.” For the purposes of the Marching Back plan, quarantine refers to the plan to move individuals who through contact tracing are known to have been exposed to Covid-19 and according to public health guidelines need to be separated from the community for 10-14 days from the last exposure date.

Contact: LCPH defines close contact as exposure of 15 minutes or more within 6 feet of the person diagnosed COVID-19 positive, less than 48 hours before symptoms began. Contacts are required to quarantine for 10-14 days.

When the college is in session, Carroll College is publishing a weekly prevalence report which provides the number of any new and active COVID-19 cases reported to Carroll College by enrolled students, faculty and staff. Due to federal regulations, we will not be providing any information beyond the number of new cases and the total number of active cases. The report is updated on Fridays and can be found on the homepage of the  Marching Forward website.  

If you will not be on campus at all, you are not required to get tested. But if you are in Helena and would like to get tested, you certainly can. You should also make sure to contact the schools or healthcare settings where you will be to ensure you are in compliance with the testing protocols for that particular setting.

COVID-19 testing is not mandatory but very much encouraged to help us keep our community safe and healthy.

 

Classes

Carroll College will begin fall term classes in-person on Wednesday, August 25. The semester will return to our traditional scheduling with a customary 5-day fall break and Thanksgiving holiday with finals taking place December 13-16. View the academic calendar for specific details and dates.

As a means of mitigating the risk of COVID-19 on campus, students are currently required to wear masks/face coverings in all classrooms, labs, and when meeting with faculty and staff. 

The college is continually monitoring the Lewis and Clark County COVID-19 levels of community transmission and will notify the college community when this mask requirement changes.

To request an accommodation, fill out the appropriate form found here.

Residential Life

At this time, Carroll is requiring masks in the classroom and in meetings with faculty/staff. However, mask usage continues to be one of the best ways to limit the spread of the virus. Masks both help prevent people from spreading the coronavirus to others as well as protect mask wearers from becoming infected themselves.

We will be requiring that all students and faculty wear masks in the classrooms and in meetings with faculty and staff (regardless of vaccination status) until county transmission levels drop below the orange/red (substantial/high) transmission levels for our community. Masks will also be requested for all large indoor orientation events.

In addition, updated guidance from the CDC(link is external) recommends mask use in indoor settings in locations experiencing increased COVID-19 transmission and infection. This online data tracker(link is external) indicates that Lewis and Clark County is currently experiencing a “high” level of community transmission.

In light of this guidance and updated county information, in an effort to best protect our community, we are highly recommending that all individuals, regardless of vaccination status, wear face masks while in communal indoor spaces on campus.

Our housing is not at full capacity. Natural demand has left us with open space for quarantine and isolation, and additional space for students. Masks will not be required in rooms, and we are asking that each roommate talk about and sign a roommate agreement for how they are going to keep each other (and the community) safe as we navigate living in smaller spaces.

Athletics

At this time, Carroll and the Frontier and Cascade Conferences are planning for the regular resumption of all fall sports.

Details can be found on the Carroll Athletics webpage.

Dining Services

Carroll's food service provider, Sodexo, plans to resume all regular services in the dining hall for the fall semester with no additional modifications at this time.

Buildings & Facilities

Our facility services department is in charge of monitoring and of doing the actual disinfecting.  We have purchased many supplies, for instance the fogger machines used on airplanes and in large public spaces and have increased the number of times those facilities are cleaned.  In the classroom, faculty have stepped forward and are ensuring classes are disinfected between each class.

Prospective Students

Yes, campus tours are available at this time. At this time, masks are optional but highly recommended in all public spaces and are required in the classroom and in meetings with faculty/staff. We are asking people do self-health checks before they come to campus and, when possible, limiting the size of tour groups. Please contact visit@carroll.edu to schedule your visit.

By emailing admission@carroll.edu or by connecting with your personal admission counselor, you can get any questions answered, as well as get phone or virtual meetings set up with financial aid, faculty members, or others who can answer your questions.

In addition, there are virtual tours available online.

Events

At this time, Carroll plans to resume on-campus and in-person events, while continuing to be cautious with large groups and practice health and safety protocols with enhanced cleaning, handwashing and social distancing when possible. 

We will continue to monitor the health situation on campus and in our community and should circumstances change, we will seek guidance from our local, state and federal health professionals regarding events throughout the semester.

For information on Carroll College events, visit our online calendar of events.

Faculty/Staff

Faculty and Staff – if you are COVID-19 positive:

Lewis & Clark Public Health, your health provider or the Carroll College Wellness Center will directly contact anyone who has been tested and is confirmed positive for COVID-19. 

If you are contacted by Lewis & Clark Public Health, all employees should take the following steps:

  • Staff: Notify your supervisor 
  • Faculty: Contact your department chair or VP for Academic Affairs to begin making arrangements 
  • If you are ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center, or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at: 406-457-4180

Please also follow these guidelines:

  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare professional except to get medical care.
  • Do not go to work, school or public areas.  
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home – stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

Returning to normal activity:  You can return to normal activity according to the CDC Guidelines with others after:

  • At least 10 days since symptoms first appeared and
  • At least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and
  • Symptoms have improved

If you had no symptoms, you can return to normal activity 10 days after your positive test.  

Faculty and Staff – if you are a confirmed contact:

Lewis & Clark Public Health will directly contact anyone who has been identified as a close contact by someone who has a confirmed positive COVID-19 case. A close contact as defined by public health is someone who has been in contact with someone who has COVID-19:

  • Closer that six feet
  • For more than 15 minutes
  • In enclosed space
  • During the 48 hour period before or after testing

The public health officer can help provide information about testing or you may work with your healthcare provider. The Carroll College Wellness Center may be able to provide some general guidance as well by calling 406-447-5441.

If you are contacted by Lewis & Clark Public Health, all faculty and staff should take the following steps:

  • Fill out the COVID-19 Reporting Form
  • Staff: Notify your supervisor
  • Faculty: Contact your department chair or VP for Academic Affairs to begin making arrangements
  • If you become ill, contact your healthcare provider, the Wellness Center, or if it is after hours, call St. Peter’s Urgent Care Line at: 406-457-4180

Please also follow these guidelines:

  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare professional except to get medical care.
  • Do not go to work, school or public areas.
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Practice frequent hand washing, wearing a mask when in spaces others use, disinfect surfaces you touch, and keep your space clean.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home – stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom, if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

Returning to normal activity:

If you had no symptoms, you can return to normal activity 10 days after you have been notified by public health that you were a close contact. 

If you become symptomatic, please refer to “What to do if I feel ill” question.

Faculty and Staff – if you feel ill:

If you feel ill or have been, please follow the guidance below:

  • During regular business hours call the Carroll College Wellness Center 9 am-12 pm and 1 pm-4 pm Monday through Friday (do not go to the center before calling first) or call your local healthcare provider.
    • Carroll College Wellness Center: 406-447-5441
    • The Wellness Center Staff will ask you a series of COVID-related questions about symptoms you may be experiencing such as:
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
      • Fever – 100.4° and above 
      • Chills
      • Runny nose or new sinus congestion
      • Muscle pain
      • Headache
      • Sore throat
      • Fatigue
      • New loss of taste or smell
      • This list does not include all possible symptoms. Other less common symptoms have been reported, including gastrointestinal symptoms like nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. 
  • After hours, call the St. Peter’s Urgent Care hotline at: 406-457-4180
  • After assessing your symptoms, the Wellness Center may order a COVID-19 test.

If you are tested, until test results are obtained:

  • Stay home until instructed otherwise by Lewis & Clark Public Health or a healthcare professional.
  • Do not go to work, school or public areas.  
  • Notify your supervisors that you are sick or suspect you may be sick and will not attend class/work/practice.
  • Ask friends or family members to do your shopping or use a grocery delivery service.
  • Isolate yourself from people and animals in your home – stay in a specific room away from other people and use a separate bathroom if available. Limit contact with pets and other animals. If possible, have a member of your household care for them. If you must care for an animal, wear a face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them. 

After test results are obtained:

  • An interviewer from public health will contact you if you (re)test positive for COVID-19, usually by phone. 
  • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, the interviewer will help you understand what to do next and what support is available.
  • Lewis & Clark Public Health will let you know how long you should isolate yourself if you tested positive for COVID-19.  
  • If you have a confirmed case of COVID-19, complete and submit the COVID-19 Reporting Form

If you are not tested: You can return to campus 48 hours after experiencing your last symptom, including having no fever without fever reducer.

While, in consultation with the Office of Human Resources, a supervisor may request a physician note for an employee’s absence, Carroll’s policy is to treat any medical information as a confidential medical record. Any disclosure of medical information will be shared on a limited basis with only those who have a business necessity to know which may include HR staff, supervisors, and department leadership.

General Questions