Course Descriptions

Communication Courses

CO 101 - Basic Communication

3.00 Cr

Introduction to the field of communication through the study of life-enhancing communication skills including listening attentively, managing conflict, interviewing successfully, interpreting media, sustaining healthy relationships, working effectively in groups and communicating amid diversity. Students also receive training in multiple forms of public speaking. Assignments apply communication training to students' personal, academic and professional lives.

CO 108 - Digital Publishing

3.00 Cr
An introduction to digital publishing in the age of social media. Students learn basic design philosophy in addition to how to use traditional desktop publishing softwae such as Adobe InDesign for production of pamplets, newsletters, etc. Plus advanced units on digital design, Photoshop, designing for the Web and guides for effective PowerPoint presentations using digital tools.

CO 111 - Introduction to Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and British Parliamentary (BP)/World Debate. Events include extemporaneous, impromptu, after-dinner speaking, persuasion, informative, prose, communication analysis, poetry, duo, dramatic, program oral interpretation and BP/World Debate.

CO 112 - Introduction to Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and British Parliamentary (BP)/World Debate. Events include extemporaneous, impromptu, after-dinner speaking, persuasion, informative, prose, communication analysis, poetry, duo, dramatic, program oral interpretation and BP/World Debate.

CO 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr

Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video." In this course students can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce short movies that could end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies video competition. The course will then expand into elements of film production, all taught by a professor who has produced documentaries and trained professional broadcasters.

CO 165 - Fund TV/Film Production:Writg

3.00 Cr
Introduces students to the writing techniques and design of TV, Film and video programs in both multi-camera and single-camera environments. Students learn about writing styles and techniques, story structure, narration, and dialogue through the writing of broadcast news, persuasive (advertisements), documentary and drama scripts for the audio-visual medium. Students will also have the opportunity to translate their scripts into visual pieces through a hands-on camera exercise.

CO 166 - Film/TV Prod II: Aesthetics

3.00 Cr
Students learn about the creative process of producing film and television programs: camerawork, lighting, art direction, set design, costume design, sound design, editing, and how they all contribute to the film and TV production process. Through a hands-on approach (camerawork) and critical analysis, students will learn and understand how messages are successfully and unsuccessfully crafted, targeted, and delivered through the TV and film medium.

CO 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CO 206 - Small Group Communication

3.00 Cr
The study of group communication processes. Students will learn group communication theory and then apply that theory through in-class group games and out-of-class group projects. The course studies teaches leadership and conflict management skills necessary for leading teams of all types in organizations.

CO 211 - Advanced Forensics 2nd Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 212 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 215 - Intro to Public Relations I

3.00 Cr
A two-semester introduction to the theory and practice of public relations. The first semester focuses on theory and on PR writing (including press releases). The second semester focuses on case studies and the design of a public relations campaign for a local organization.

CO 216 - Intro to Public Relations II

3.00 Cr
A two-semester introduction to the theory and practice of public relations. The first semester focuses on theory and on PR writing (including press releases). The second semester focuses on case studies and the design of a public relations campaign for a local organization.

CO 225 - Professional Communication

3.00 Cr
An advanced course in public speaking with practical career-training emphasis, this course is aimed at preparing students to make polished public presentations. The course will include units on listening, mindfulness, contemplative computing, job interviewing, and public speaking for professionals.

CO 226 - Community Assistant Seminar

2.00 Cr
A course designed for paraprofessionals working in residence halls. By means of readings, professional speakers, and discussions, students will become more effective in performing duties and accepting responsibilities of a resident assistant. Class begins one week before fall semester;

CO 227 - Student Ambassador Seminar

1.00 Cr
A course designed for Student Ambassadors (Carroll's student tour guides). Topics covered will include communication and presentation skills, history and facts about Carroll College, Student Services/resources on campus, and a general overview of the admission process. By means of readings, professional speakers, and discussions, students will become more effec -tive in performing duties and understanding the responsibilities of Student Ambassadors. There will be some written homework assignments as well as out of class work (shadowing tours, helping with admission special events, etc).

CO 236 - Prospector Student Newspaper I

1.00 Cr
All students are welcome to join the staff of The Prospector, the student newspaper. Students will be assigned tasks in accordance with their talents and the papers' needs: writing stories, taking photos, designing pages or selling ads.

CO 237 - Prospector Student Newspaper 2

1.00 Cr
All students are welcome to join the staff of The Prospector, the student newspaper. Students will be assigned tasks in accordance with their talents and the papers' needs: writing stories, taking photos, designing pages or selling ads.

CO 250 - Social Media and Communication

3.00 Cr
Social Media & Communication examines the profound shift that the Internet, social networking, digital publishing and mobile media technologies (Facebook, Twitter, et al) have on the communication and business landscape. Through both theoretical and practical study, students will examine evolving technologies and their application to personal life, business development and business marketing/sales. The course will end with experiential learning labs utilizing social media, social networking and real-time publishing.

CO 260 - Servant Leadership

3.00 Cr
Servant Leadership, based on Robert Greenleaf's theory, is a leadership course designed to train students to lead humbly, putting service first. Students will learn about the theories of servant leadership, customer service and forgiveness to gain a full understanding of humility-based leadership.

CO 265 - Basic Single Camera Production

4.00 Cr
This course focuses on camera production. The course incorporates actual skill of video shooting and Final Cut editing suite use. Students will assume the role of writer/producer/director and organize a production team, schedule, a shoot and final editing of production into a complete show ready for TV broadcast. Lab required.

CO 275 - Conflict Management

3.00 Cr
Students learn various strategies for engaging in productive conflict management, while preventing and de-escalating destructive conflict. The course examines the dynamics of everyday conflicts across a variety of settings, from personal relationships to the workplace. Additionally, students will be asked to reflect on their own style of conflict management and improve their skills. Course content will include both theory and application, with an emphasis on their interrelation. Topics include factors that influence conflict choices, ethical implications, options for third-party intervention, and the roles of forgiveness and reconciliation.

CO 279 - Writing About Movies (WI)

3.00 Cr
Course is designed to teach a student to recognize and appreciate a good film. Students will watch films, read film reviews, and learn how to write and publish film reviews.

CO 280 - Gender Communication (ND)

3.00 Cr
Examination of interactive relationships between gender and communication in contemporary American society. Course will explore ways that communication creates and perpetuates gender roles and how socially created gender roles are enacted in public and private settings. Students will connect research to everyday lives.

CO 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CO 306 - Writing for the Media (WI)

3.00 Cr
Students learn basic elements of journalistic writing for the print media, including news reporting, feature writing, and column writing. Course includes study of libel law, observation of community media, and production of one issue of the school newspaper. Students will learn AP Style, the gold standard for journalistic writing.

CO 308 - Communication Ethics

3.00 Cr
Course seeks to deepen insights into ethical issues arising on all frontiers of communication, ranging from small groups to news media. Students will read case studies of ethical crises and learn to apply philosophical and religious ethical principles to those crises.

CO 310 - Mass Media

3.00 Cr
The study of the history and theory of contemporary mass media including radio, television, and print media. The course examines the cultural forces that shape and define mass media as well as the way mass media shapes our culture.

CO 311 - Advanced Forensics 3rd Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 312 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 320 - Organizational Communication

3.00 Cr
This course presents both historical and current perspectives on the origins and usefulness of organizational theory relating to communication, emphasizing the relationship between organizational life and communication principles. The course provides an opportunity for experiential learning, combined with theory, for under-standing and improving communication skills in a variety of organizational settings. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain how communication functions within organizations and how communication practices can be used to understand and enhance both employee relationships and organizational effectiveness.

CO 325G - Intercultural Comm (GD)

3.00 Cr
Study of the relationship between culture and communication in everyday life. Students will consider the nature and place of cultural practices in social life and will examine the influence of features of culture (world views, values, beliefs) on communication encounters. Students will examine topics related to diversity and social justice, such as ethnocentrism and stereotyping.

Prerequisite: CO 101.

Spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity requirement or Global Diversity requirement, but not both.

CO 325N - Intercultural Comm (ND)

3.00 Cr
Study of the relationship between culture and communication in everyday life. Students will consider the nature and place of cultural practices in social life and will examine the influence of features of culture (world views, values, beliefs) on communication encounters. Students will examine topics related to diversity and social justice, such as ethnocentrism and stereotyping.

Prerequisite: CO 101.

Spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity requirement or Global Diversity requirement, but not both.

CO 340 - Interpersonal Comm Theory

3.00 Cr
The study of interpersonal communication from both a personal and theoretical standpoint. Topics include interpersonal concepts (listening, empathy, confirmation, humor, social support, self-disclosure, apprehension, defensiveness, etc.), the initiation, maintenance, and termination of platonic, romantic, and family relationships as well as attraction, courtship, affection, conflict, and destructive behavior.

CO 360 - Health Communication

3.00 Cr
A theoretical and practical examination of the central role of communication in the provision of health care. Students will examine communication issues such as empathy, therapeutic listening, trust, self-disclosure, social support, and interactional control/power and their use and impact on our emotional and physical well-being and in varying heath care relationships: individual (e.g., the patient role, the provider role), interpersonal (e.g., provider-client, provider-family), group (e.g., healthcare teams, self-help/support groups), organizational, and societal. Designed to serve all students, especially those seeking careers as healthcare professionals.

CO 365 - Saints TV: TV Production

3.00 Cr
An application of the structure and aesthetics of message design in film and television. The course is an extension and application of theories and skills from CO 165, CO 166, and CO 265. It is designed to broaden student exposure to single and multi-camera production procedures and technology in the classroom and in the field. Students will incorporate script, picture, and sound to create television programs for Saints TV.

CO 395 - Research Methods Seminar

3.00 Cr
A discussion of selected communication issues associated with researching and reporting about human interaction. The student will investigate the scope, central concepts, and practices of communication research with particular focus upon microanalysis, ethnography, surveys, and experiments.

CO 411 - Advanced Forensics 4th Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 412 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 414 - Human Communication Theory

3.00 Cr
A critical study of classical and contemporary communication theory. Students consider foundations of communication theory through examination of traditions of theorizing including Rhetoric, Semiotics, Cybernetics, Critical Theory, and Phenomenology.

CO 417 - Methods of Teaching Speech Com

1.00 Cr
Theoretical and applied study of teaching communication and coaching speech. Students will read works on the philosophy of education and will complete a teaching and coaching project.

CO 420 - Globalization Gender & Com-GD

3.00 Cr
This course explores the instruments of globalization and its socio-econo-cultural impact on gender. Students will identify the political, social, and cultural fault lines created by the concept of globalization. The course will examine issues such as the impact of wars, media, and international institutions on the loss of nation-state autonomy and borders as well as globalization's effect on gendered inequality. Also, the course will also examine power shifts and a reconfiguration of political power and civil society and a change in gender roles within the context of national cultures and the global economy.

CO 425 - Comm Career Internship

1.00 Cr
An option available to the communication major who is preparing for a career in public relations, TV/radio broadcasting, public information, communication consulting, or as a media specialist. The student will intern in an appropriate business, state office, or federal agency in the Helena community for supervised, practical experience in the area of the intended career. Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

CO 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

CO 495 - Senior Prac:The Graceful Exit

1.00 Cr
A capstone course about life transitions - particularly the graceful exit from college and the humble entrance into a post-college career. Course includes units on selecting and applying to graduate schools, job interviewing, resume writing, web-based job searching and conference call interviews with successful communication and public relations alumni.

CO 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

CS 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr
Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video." In this course students can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce short movies that could end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies video competition. The course will then expand into elements of film production, all taught by a professor who has produced documentaries and trained professional broadcasters.

ILC 389C - World Cinema (GD)

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Literature and global diversity.

This interdisciplinary course will focus on social justice and human rights issues in the world through a critical engagement with the aesthetics and the politics of African, Asian, European, and Latin and North American cinemas. This course will have two major service learning components: Students enrolled in this course will take a leadership role in the organization of the Social Justice Human Rights Film Festival, which will be open to the Carroll and Helena community. Students will also conduct research throughout the semester culminating in the production of short videos on social justice and human rights issues in the local community.