Course Descriptions

Health Sciences Courses

HS 198 - Intro to Health Sciences

3.00 Cr
This course presents a multi-disciplinary look at topics in the health sciences. Students will explore a range of issues that affect health at all levels enhanced by presentations from health professionals from the Helena community. Students who are anticipating careers in health and medical fields, those who are considering graduate health studies, as well as students who want to help improve health and wellness in their communities and beyond will find this an engaging introduction to the field of health sciences.

HS 230 - Intro to Epidemiology

3.00 Cr
This introductory course covers foundational concepts through study design for epidemiologic investigations of infectious and chronic diseases. Evaluation of screening programs and health services research will also be discussed. Problems presented in class will provide students with the opportunity for gaining skills in descriptive and analytic epidemiology and will include outbreak investigations, the natural history of infectious diseases, validity of clinical tests, and statistical methodology used for differing types of epidemiologic studies.

HS 303 - Public Health Nutrition

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on the main concepts of nutritional health from a public health perspective. Students will learn about health promotion and disease prevention via nutritional issues, as well as community based approaches to nutritional health and disease prevention. This course addresses private and governmental health care providers and food assistance programs; nutritional interventions and response for vulnerable and special populations; the complex links between health, social, and economic factors with regard to nutrition; and best practice delivery of nutritional information and services.

HS 307 - Evidnce Based Rsrch Methd(WI)

3.00 Cr
HS 307 is an introduction to and exploration of basic scientific research processes, including the use of citation databases, evaluation of the literature, and data analyses. Students will learn the differences between primary, secondary, and tertiary research through the writing process and how research leads to evidence-based practice in clinical and public health settings.

HS 325 - Applied Anatomical Kinesiology

3.00 Cr
Course includes the study of the anatomical locations, insertions, and actions of the major skeletal muscles, the structure and function of the major joints of the body, and a review of the skeleton. It will emphasize basic myology and osteology and their relationship to the science of body movement.

HS 329 - Public Health & Environment

3.00 Cr
This course provides students with an introduction to and overview of the key areas and principles of environmental health. Students will gain an understanding of 1) the interaction between individuals, communities, and the environment, 2) the impacts of various environmental contaminants on public health, and 3) specific applications of environmental engineering to improve environmental and human health. Topics to be covered include environmental policy and regulation, environmental cleanup and remediation processes, and standards for water quality, air quality, food safety and waste disposal.

HS 335G - Health Policy Mgmt/Issues(GD)

3.00 Cr
This course addresses key topics in global health. Students will gain additional awareness of the biological and social aspects of major global health issues and diseases. General areas of emphasis are chronic and infectious diseases, nutrition, and environmental health. Within these areas populations at risk, health policies, and programs designed to reduce health inequalities will be analyzed. Students will also become proficient in public/global health vocabulary, basic methods used to assess global health, and explore resources for further understanding emerging health issues.

Prerequisite: MA 207 and HS 230.

Fall and spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

HS 335N - Health Policy Mgmt/Issues(ND)

3.00 Cr
This course addresses key topics in global health. Students will gain additional awareness of the biological and social aspects of major global health issues and diseases. General areas of emphasis are chronic and infectious diseases, nutrition, and environmental health. Within these areas populations at risk, health policies, and programs designed to reduce health inequalities will be analyzed. Students will also become proficient in public/global health vocabulary, basic methods used to assess global health, and explore resources for further understanding emerging health issues.

Prerequisite: MA 207 and HS 230.

Fall and spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

HS 405 - Senior Seminar (WI)

1.00 Cr
The purpose of this seminar is to provide senior level public health majors information that will assist them in preparing for professional life. Students planning to attend graduate school should try to take this course during fall semester.

HS 413 - Exercise Physiology/Human Perf

3.00 Cr
The study of basic physiological functions of the body and their response to exercise. Topics include muscle structure and function, responses and adaptations to exercise, energy metabolism, effects of exercise and training on body composition, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, and nutrition and other aids to performance.

HS 415 - Health Sciences Internship

1.00 Cr
Health Sciences or Public Health students will complete an internship in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend 3-18 hours per week in their internship site. For more information, please see program web page. Planning for internships must occur during the semester prior to participating in an internship.

HS 485 - HS Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

HS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
Senior Thesis (Effective August 1, 2016)

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic.

Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College.

The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project.

For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants.

The thesis is to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. If the thesis credits exceed the credit limit, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PH 200 - Public Health Field Experience

1.00 Cr
Public Health majors will be assigned a field placement in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend three hours per week per credit in the assigned setting.

PH 330G - Public Health Methods(GD)

3.00 Cr
The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services in the United States. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society.

Fall semester.

Service Learning course.

Fulfills either National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

PH 330N - Public Health Methods(ND)(SL)

3.00 Cr
The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services in the United States. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society.

Prerequisite: Students must have at least sophomore standing

Fall semester.

Service Learning course.

Fulfills either National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

PH 333 - Public Hea Theories & Practice

3.00 Cr
The purpose of this course will be to expose students to aspects of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. The models for program planning, the planning process, assessing needs, measurement, interventions, and community organizing and community building, and allocation of resources will be discussed.

PH 389 - PH Special Topics

1.00 Cr
-189 -289 -389 -489 course descriptions: Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PH 405 - Senior Seminar (WI)

1.00 Cr
The purpose of this seminar is to provide senior level public health majors information that will assist them in preparing for professional life. Students planning to attend graduate school should try to take this course during fall semester.

PH 410 - Management of Health Prom Prgm

3.00 Cr
This course is the study of methods of managing health promotion programs, including budgeting, performance appraisals, job descriptions, program models, managing employees, marketing and effective meetings.

PH 415 - Public Health Internship

1.00 Cr
Health Sciences or Public Health students will complete an internship in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend 3-18 hours per week in their internship site. For more information, please see program web page. Planning for internships must occur during the semester prior to participating in an internship.

PH 485 - PH Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
Senior Thesis (Effective August 1, 2016)

The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic.

Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College.

The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project.

For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants.

The thesis is to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. If the thesis credits exceed the credit limit, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.