Course Descriptions

Communication Courses

CO 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr
Get Smart! Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video" so in this course student citizens can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce movies that will end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies competition. The Citizen Video course will then expand into Citizen Media, and the world of podcasting and video casting. An entry-level digital moviemaking and citizen media primer for student filmmakers. You can use your smart phone or your camera or video or iPad to shoot some video. (We even have a couple of video-cameras.) Then we will edit it into something interesting. Whether it goes viral is out of our hands, but it will be good enough for the Charlies! Cross listed with computer science CS-130.

CS 103 - Instructional Media and Tech

3.00 Cr
This course is intended for students seeking teacher licensure. Students will not only interact with new technologies for enhanced learning and engagement in instructional media, but develop technology based unit plans (TBUP's) for future integration of technology into education. Course focus is on both hardware and software of instructional media. No prior knowledge of computers or other technology is assumed.

CS 110 - Introduction to Programming

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to using computer programs as a way of modeling, analyzing and enhancing the world. The Java language is both powerful and commonly used in business, science and many other applications of computing. An integrated laboratory provides experience in programming and algorithmic problem-solving. Topics include computing and object oriented design methodology, Java fundamentals, modifying objects, control constructs, function usage basics and libraries, programmer defined functions, parameter passing, arrays, the class construct and object-oriented design, event-based programming, and implementing abstract data types.

CS 120 - Data Structures & Prog Design

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to program design, fundamental data structures, and analysis of algorithms. The course addresses data structures as tools that you can use to solve problems that arise in modeling a situation and then executing (simulating) the resultant model. As in CS 110, the course makes use of graphics, sound, pictures, and other media. Topics include contiguous and linked lists (stacks, queues, and general lists), search and sort techniques, binary trees, tables, hashing, recursion, and graphs.

CS 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr
Get Smart! Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video" so in this course student citizens can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce movies that will end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies competition. The Citizen Video course will then expand into Citizen Media, and the world of podcasting and video casting. An entry-level digital moviemaking and citizen media primer for student filmmakers. You can use your smart phone or your camera or video or iPad to shoot some video. (We even have a couple of video-cameras.) Then we will edit it into something interesting. Whether it goes viral is out of our hands, but it will be good enough for the Charlies! Cross listed with computer science CO-130.

CS 202 - Web Design and Development

3.00 Cr
An extensive introduction to the fundamentals of HTML/CSS, web page layout, and web site development. Students will learn HTML/CSS plus tips and tricks of making web pages work. The class will also touch on XML, AJAX, JavaScript, PHP, and Podcasting. Students will walk away with a full functioning, standards based web site (additional fee required). The course includes lectures, demonstrations, group projects, and extensive hands-on experience in a computer lab.

CS 213 - Management Information Systems

3.00 Cr
The class familiarizes students with basic concepts in the use of computer applications as management information systems for businesses. It emphasizes database design and concepts with spreadsheets for analysis and reporting of information. Managing technological change, ethics and security are also covered. Hands on projects include using MS Office for presentation, spreadsheet and database applications.

CS 220 - Programming in Excel

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to develop advanced Excel users and programmers, with students becoming proficient at developing robust and reliable spreadsheet models. This course focuses on the principles of spreadsheet model design, advanced Excel functions, PivotTables, macros, and the basics of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming, culminating in the development of automated spreadsheets with user interfaces designed for the non-technical user. Students will demonstrate proficiency in subject matter through computer labs and extended projects. Prerequisite: prior Excel experience in Carroll coursework or permission of instructor.

CS 230 - Software Engineering (WI)

4.00 Cr
This course addresses the development of software systems. Problem- solving concepts are integrated with a study of the software development life cycle, including project management, requirements analysis, system design, testing implementation, and maintenance issues. Students will create an object-oriented team project. Lectures and laboratory each week.

CS 251 - Introduction to Linux

3.00 Cr
This course will teach students to install Linux (using Ubuntu Desktop or distribution of the student's choice) and then provide basic command line (Bash) scripting competency. Students will install Linux, preferably on their own computer, in a dual boot or virtual machine environment. The ability to run Linux and Windows or Mac OS on the same machine can provide students with new computer tools. Linux/Unix is used in gaming, research and web environments. Basic skills allows students to begin participating in those environments as well as preparing them for further learning in several Computer Science and Computer Information Systems courses. Basic familiarity with computer hardware and software and your own computer (with 20GB disk free) is recommended.

CS 287 - Student Topics in Computer Sci

1.00 Cr
This course is intended for all CS and CIS minors and majors as well as other students with strong interests in technology as a way to explore new topics, implement new technologies, meet other students and develop meaningful relationships. Upper-class students lead the course. Web, coding techniques and social media technologies are likely topics. The course content will be largely student determined. The course is offered Pass/Fail only. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring new technologies. There is no fee or required materials.

CS 289 - Special Topic:

1.00 Cr
-189 -289 -389 -489 course descriptions: Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CS 310 - Database Dsgn/Implementation I

4.00 Cr
Using Oracle, this course concentrates on representing, storing and retrieving data from external storage devices. Learn SQL and software development using Oracle's Application Express. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.

CS 311 - Database Dsn/Implementation II

4.00 Cr
As a continuation of CS 330, student will analyze, design, implement, test, and present a database project in Oracle. Lectures and laboratory each week.

CS 330 - Networking Technologies

4.00 Cr
This is the first in a 2 course sequence on data network transmission technologies. The class covers the OSI and TCP/IP models of communication and IP addressing. Emphasis is on local area network (LAN) designs and technologies like cabling, Ethernet and switching. Basic routing concepts are also covered. Labs involve building and configuring your own networks to generate and observe traffic and network behaviors. The labs use primarily Cisco equipment and track Cisco CCNA certification standards.

CS 331 - Internet Infrastructure

4.00 Cr
This the second in the 2 course sequence on data network transmission technologies. The class covers advanced routing protocols such as OSPF, IS-IS, MPLS and BGP as well as supernetting, IPv6 addressing and audio and video transmission and issues like QOS (quality of service) and multicasting. The class also focuses on ISP and wide area technologies (WAN) such as T carrier, Sonet, frame-relay, ATM and ISDN. Labs emphasize building and debugging complex networks and track Cisco CCNP certification content.

Prerequisite: CS 330, Cisco CCNA certification or consent of the instructor.

Spring semester, odd-numbered years.

CS 389 - Special Topics: Computer Sci

1.00 Cr
-189 -289 -389 -489 course descriptions: Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CS 410 - Operating Systems

4.00 Cr
This class covers the design and theory of modern computer operating systems. It explores topics such as process management, CPU scheduling, memory management and protection, device management and diversified operating systems. The lab component utilizes open source (Linux or Unix based) systems and Microsoft systems to build and administer common operating systems in a network environment.

CS 421 - Cyber Security

4.00 Cr
This course combines knowledge and skills from the computer network classes with the Operating Systems class (CS410) to build, compromise and secure computer network and server systems. Labs include using Cisco, Microsoft, and Linux systems (switches, routers, workstations and servers) as well as implementing network firewalls. The course also covers security concepts, policies, and risk management as well as hacking techniques and defenses.

CS 425 - Computer Science Internship

1.00 Cr
This course is an internship consisting of supervised work experience with a business or nonprofit agency in the computer science field. Ideally the internship should relate the type of work (network, web, programming, etc.) that the student is most interested in. Forms and procedures can be obtained through the Carroll internship coordinator.

CS 430 - Senior Project: Your Project

4.00 Cr
This course will present students with a substantial experience in software engineering. Students will investigate, design, implement, and present a significant software project, working both as individuals and in project teams. Projects will also teach the students about project management concerns.

CS 495 - Computer Science Seminar

3.00 Cr
ious topics not covered in other computer science courses are researched and discussed. Students analyze selected readings on ethics and the integration of technology in business and the world in general as well as work on related projects and/or papers. Students participate in defining and presenting their own content in the class.

CS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
Senior Thesis (Effective August 1, 2016) The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College.

The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project.

For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants.

The thesis is to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. If the thesis credits exceed the credit limit, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ENGR 326 - Energy & the Environment (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course will look at the role that energy plays in our modern world. We will learn about the physics of energy so that students can calculate the energy content of a variety of systems, such as: gasoline, other fossil fuels, nuclear, solar, wind, bio mass and so on. Applications of the energy schemes in our lives will then be explored. We will discuss the global use and needs of energy and the environmental problems that have resulted from energy development and how we can improve our community and the world.

GIS 110 - Introduction to GIS

2.00 Cr
This course will cover the principles and application of Geographic Information Systems. Topics covered include spatial data models, obtaining and creating spatial data, GPS, GIS databases, spatial analysis, raster analysis and cartographic modeling. The emphasis is on hands on use of GIS software and data.

GIS 220 - GIS Databases

3.00 Cr
This course will cover the principles of spatial database design as well as the Integration of various spatial and non-spatial data formats into GIS databases. The course will focus on using current GIS technologies and trends in spatial data management design, create and manage GIS databases. Topics to be covered include GIS and relational database design as well as Integration of disparate data sources such as CAD, GPS and surveying data.

GIS 315 - Spatial Analysis

3.00 Cr
GIS 315 will bring together concepts from previous GIS courses by practical application of methods and procedures used in GIS. The focus will be on using real world project examples and exercises to provide advanced instruction on GIS analytical models and techniques and prepare students to be able to complete professional level GIS projects from start to finish. Automated model development is also covered.

GIS 316 - Raster Analysis

3.00 Cr
This course will give students experience in application and issues surrounding using raster GIS data such as the raster structure (its advantages and limitations), appropriate data and procedures, surface modeling and 3D datasets. Integration of remote sensing data into raster GIS datasets will also be covered. Other topics will include: vector to raster conversion, resampling, raster modeling/map algebra, interpolation and digital terrain modeling and analysis.

GIS 430 - GIS Project

1.00 Cr
The GIS Senior Project course demonstrates the student's ability to apply their knowledge and expertise in geospatial science and technologies to a problem in their major or area of interest. This course may be taken in conjunction with a Senior Thesis, Senior Project, Honors Thesis or other Project based class in a major with the consent of both instructors. The GIS Senior Project should address a moderately complex issue that is appropriate for detailed investigation using geospatial techniques.

GIS 485 - GIS Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.