ENLT 373 - 19th Century U.S. Literature

ENLT 373 - 19th Century U.S. Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of major currents of nineteenth-century literature of the United States, from the antebellum period, through the Civil War, to the very beginnings of the twentieth century. The course may explore any of the following literary movements: the Romantic movement, including Transcendentalist writers and philosophers (e.g., Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau), as well as the writers of the Romance fiction (such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville); mid-century domestic fiction (including such writers as Louisa May Alcott and Harriet Beecher Stowe); slave narratives (Harriet Jacobs and Fredrick Douglas, among others); and American Realism, including major proponents of realism at the end of the century, such as mark Twain, William Dean Howells, and Henry James, so-called "local color writers," such as Sarah Orne Jewett and Mary Wilkins Freeman, and turn-of-the-century naturalist writers such as Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser.
Term: 
2019SP
Method: 
LEC
Faculty: 
Bernardi, Debra