Course Descriptions

English Courses

ENLE 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLE 200 - Literary Studies (WI)

3.00 Cr
Required of all majors and minors in English, this course acquaints students with literature as both an academic discipline and an art by developing the analytical and critical skills required for more sophisticated readings of literary works. By studying the literary techniques of exemplary authors, students also discover ways in which attentive reading might stimulate and guide their own writing. Along with introducing students to the vocabulary and methods of reading literary works from psycho-analytic, feminist, historicist, reader-response, and other critical perspectives, the course provides training and practice in writing literary exposition.

ENLE 332 - English Grammar

3.00 Cr
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to English grammar. It begins with a definition of grammar and then moves on to a discussion of prescriptive and descriptive ideas about grammar, grammatical prototypes, and several kinds of grammatical analysis-the traditional Reed- Kellogg diagramming and phrase structure trees. Topics include parts of the simple sentence, word classes, phrase and clause structure, sentence types, aspect, mood, voice, and the grammatical aspects of prose style.

ENLE 333 - History of English Language

3.00 Cr
The study of the origins, development and linguistic structures of Indo-European languages as cultural phenomena. Special attention is devoted to the linguistic, semantic and cultural history of the English language as it has evolved from an obscure Germanic tongue to a prominent world language. Topics include the design features of language, linguistic variation, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis, semantics, pragmatics, and the major historical forms of English.

ENLE 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLE 404 - Literary Theory & Criticism

3.00 Cr
A study of the theory and practice of literary criticism. Students will learn about and apply a variety of theories, such as formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, feminist, deconstructionist, reader-response, historicist, and post-colonial.

ENLE 411 - Teaching Eng on the Sec Level

3.00 Cr
A study of the theories and methods for teaching the communication arts in the secondary schools with special emphasis on teaching literature and composition, as well as contemporary issues within the profession.

ENLE 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENLT 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 215 - Introduction to Literature

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 215N - Intro to Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 216 - Intro to Literature (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature. Fulfills writing intensive requirement.

ENLT 216N - Intro to Literature WI ND

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

Fulfills writing intensive requirement.

Prerequisite: ENWR 102.

Each semester.

ENLT 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 289N - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 303 - Medieval English Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written in Britain during the Old English period (8th century to 1066) and Middle English period (1066 to 1485), key periods in the formation of English language and culture. Principal genres include epic and lyric poetry, romance, tale, and drama. Representative works include the epic Beowulf, the mystery and morality plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Margery Kempe's autobiography, and Arthurian romances.

ENLT 323 - Renaissance English Lit

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written in Britain during the 16th and 17th centuries, which accompanied the spread of human-ism, an emergent nationalism, and the civil strife of the latter period. Principle genres include drama and poetry. Representative authors include Sir Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, Sir Philip Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanier, the Metaphysical and Cavalier poets, Lady Mary Wroth, and John Milton.

ENLT 334 - World Literature (GD)

3.00 Cr
Critical and comparative study of selected representative literary works from African, Arabic, Latin American, and Oriental literature.

ENLT 363 - 19th Cent Brit Lit: Romantics

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written in Britain from 1780 to 1830, which both celebrated and challenged the social, political and economic changes that accompanied industrialization and the American and French revolutions. Students read non-fiction prose, poetry and novels by authors such as Mary Wollstonecraft, William Blake, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Felicia Hemans, and John Keats.

ENLT 365 - Young Adult Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written for young adults. Students will read, listen to and evaluate a wide variety of literature published for or enjoyed by young adult readers, including traditional folk tales, myths, and legends; fantasy and realistic fiction; biography and autobiography; and poetry. Students will also study techniques for teaching and using literature in the 5-12 classroom.

ENLT 367 - 19th Cent Brit Lit: Victorians

3.00 Cr
The study of literature written in Britain from 1830-1900. The course focuses on representations of individual and national identity emerging amidst sweeping social, political, and economic change. Representative works include novels by the Brontes, Dickens Eliot, Hardy, Wilde; non-fiction prose by Carlyle and Mill;- poetry by Tennyson, the Brownings and the Rosettis.

ENLT 373 - 19th Century U.S. Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of major currents of nineteenth-century literature of the United States, from the antebellum period, through the Civil War, to the very beginnings of the twentieth century. The course may explore any of the following literary movements: the Romantic movement, including Transcendentalist writers and philosophers (e.g., Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau), as well as the writers of the Romance fiction (such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville); mid-century domestic fiction (including such writers as Louisa May Alcott and Harriet Beecher Stowe); slave narratives (Harriet Jacobs and Fredrick Douglas, among others); and American Realism, including major proponents of realism at the end of the century, such as mark Twain, William Dean Howells, and Henry James, so-called "local color writers," such as Sarah Orne Jewett and Mary Wilkins Freeman, and turn-of-the-century naturalist writers such as Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser.

ENLT 383 - 20th Century Brit Lit (WI)

3.00 Cr
A study of British literature written in the 20th century, shaped by the critical shifts in thought and literary technique associated with modernism and postmodernism. Each movement, developing in the wake of a World War, is characterized by a major break with literary tradition. Principal genres include poetry, drama, novels, short fiction and the essay. Representative authors include William Butler Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Doris Lessing, Seamus Heaney, Iris Murdoch, Tom Stoppard, and Caryl Churchill.

ENLT 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 393 - Jazz Age & Harlem Renais (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of early twentieth-century American literature (called "modernism"), from World War I through the 1930s. The course explores the work of white modernist writers (many of whom were part of the expatriate community in Paris during the period) alongside that of the African American writers of the same period who lived in the United States and participated in the movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Among the writers studied may be Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, H.D. William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larson, and W.E.B Du Bois.

ENLT 397 - 20th Century U.S. Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of American literature from the beginning of the Second World War (1939) to the present. Particular focus is given to anti-establishment literature protesting the cultural conformity of the 1950s, the counterculture writers of the 1960s and early 70s and the post-modern writers of the 1980s and 90s. Includes representative literary movements such as the Agrarian writers, Beat writers, the confessional poets, the Vietnam writers, and a wide variety of ethnic writers producing literature in traditional and experimental forms. Representative authors include Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Eudora Welty, Marianne Moore, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O'Connor, Robert Lowell, Tennessee Williams, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Arthur Miller, Tim O'Brien, Nikki Giovanni, Alice Walker, Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Edward Albee, David Mamet and Maria Irene Fornes.

ENLT 410 - Women's Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written by women, exploring what it means when women become the center of their own stories. The subtitle of the course will help define the focus: it may focus on writings by women from Britain, the U.S., any ethnic and/or national group, or a combination of any of the above. The course may focus on one century, a more limited historical period, or span several. Feminist literary and cultural theory may be an added focus. Writers may include: Jane Austen, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Gloria Anzaldua.

ENLT 411 - African American Lit (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of the history of African American literature. The course begins with early writings by slaves (these may include Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs); moves through the nineteenth century to study the Harlem Renaissance writers of the early twentieth century (including W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston); continues into the twentieth century to investigate post-World War II works (by such writers as Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansbury, and Gwendolyn Brooks); and ends with investigating contemporary African American texts (these may include novels by Toni Morrison and movies directed by Spike Lee).

ENLT 412 - Native American Authors (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written by American Indian authors, beginning with the cultural traditions and influences within oral literature, then moving through the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This exploration continues through the works of the twentieth century, surveying poetry, fiction, and non-fiction by authors such as N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, Wendy Rose, Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Luci Tapahonso, Louis Owens, Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, and Montana American Indian authors D?Arcy McNickle and James Welch.

ENLT 423 - Shakespeare

3.00 Cr
A study of the dramatic and poetic art of William Shakespeare. Plays from both the Elizabethan and Jacobean pe-riods will be selected to illustrate the development of the author?s style and theatrical conventions, with representation from the histories, the comedies, the Roman plays, the tragedies, the problem plays, and the late romances. Students will develop their critical faculties by applying a variety of recent approaches to Shakespearean scholarship.

ENLT 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENLT 489N - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ENWR 101 - Basic Composition

3.00 Cr
This course covers the basic elements of writing-grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraphs. It is also concerned with audience, voice, and techniques for generating and organizing ideas into an essay, as well as introduction to the library.

ENWR 102 - College Composition II

4.00 Cr

A preparation for students to write within the larger academic community. Students study conventions of effective writing for various types of academic essays, including research papers. Includes instruction in online and library research.

Placement determined by score on national exams or passing grade in ENWR 101.

ENWR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 264 - Intro Creative Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
After preliminary instruction in the basic elements and techniques of creative writing, students create original works of poetry and fiction and polish them in workshops with other members of the class. The course is open to those who have not had a poetry or fiction writing course in college.

ENWR 302 - Expository Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
The study and practice of advanced exposition, including creative non-fiction genres and argumentation. Students read professional writers and critique classmates' drafts. The course emphasizes techniques for revising and polishing expository prose. Prerequisite: ENWR 102 or consent of instructor.

ENWR 303 - Grant Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course provides students with knowledge and skills in the grant writing process. Through a combination of readings, lectures, assignments and a full written grant proposal, students will gain knowledge and experience in the major elements of grant writing, including grant sources, grant proposals, timelines, budgets, informed consent forms, the review process and grant management.

ENWR 305 - Workplace Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course prepares students to meet the demands of workplace writing in business, administrative, and technical fields. Focused on understanding the reader as a basis for planning and drafting documents, students work on discovering the purpose, structure, and appropriate level of detail for on-the-job writing. Practice is offered in a variety of workplace genres, including flyers, instructions, brochures, webpages, proposals, letters, memos, resumes, formal and informal reports. Students also cultivate workplace style, especially in the areas of clarity, concision, cohesion, and correctness. Attention also given to formatting documents in professional ways.

ENWR 306 - Writing for the Media (WI)

3.00 Cr
Students learn basic elements of journalistic writing for the print media, including news reporting, feature writing, and column writing. Course includes study of libel law, observation of community media, and production of one issue of the school newspaper. Students will learn AP Style, the gold standard for journalistic writing.

ENWR 337 - Creative Writing (WI):

3.00 Cr
In-depth study and practice of a major genre or mode of contemporary writing, such as drama, memoir, or nature writing. Topic selected by the instructor.

ENWR 347 - Creative Writing (WI):

3.00 Cr
In-depth study and practice of a major genre or mode of contemporary writing, such as drama, memoir, or nature writing. Topic selected by the instructor.

ENWR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 425 - ENWR Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

ENWR 461 - Adv Creative Writing (WI)

1.00 Cr
Advanced Creative Writing is a weekly meeting of experienced writers of poetry and fiction (and other genres) for the purpose of honing their skills through a semester of extensive writing and rigorous workshops with other advanced student writers. Students who take the course for fewer than three credits are given reduced submission requirements, but must still attend and participate in all workshop meetings. Since the course is a workshop, the content varies from year to year.

ENWR 485 - Indpendnt Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENWR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 498 - Capstone Seminar (WI)

3.00 Cr
The English Capstone Workshop is a writing course in which advanced English majors practice professional writing and presentation skills and aid one another in the further development of these skills. The course is required for all English majors who are in the last fall semester of study before graduation. Members of the class plan the Carroll College Literary Festival, held on campus in November; they propose, organize, and coordinate sessions on subjects of interest in literature, writing, and English Educatio and they issue calls for papers to English majors and other interested parties for presentation at the conference. Students then spend the semester writing senior projects, regularly subjecting submitting drafts the texts they are working on to intensive workshops by the other members of the class. They then present portions of their final project at the literary festival.

ENWR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ILC 389C - World Cinema (GD)

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Literature and global diversity.

This interdisciplinary course will focus on social justice and human rights issues in the world through a critical engagement with the aesthetics and the politics of African, Asian, European, and Latin and North American cinemas. This course will have two major service learning components: Students enrolled in this course will take a leadership role in the organization of the Social Justice Human Rights Film Festival, which will be open to the Carroll and Helena community. Students will also conduct research throughout the semester culminating in the production of short videos on social justice and human rights issues in the local community.