Course Descriptions

Chemistry Courses

CH 101 - General Chemistry I

3.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 101L - General Chemistry I Lab

1.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 102 - General Chemistry II

3.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 102L - General Chemistry II Lab

1.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 103 - Accelerated General Chemistry

4.00 Cr
This course will provide a solid foundation in the basic principles of chemistry that underlie more advanced topics in chemistry, biology and engineering. It is intended for students majoring in the sciences and engineering (but it is open to anyone). One semester accelerated course covering topics that include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, intermolecular force, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. This is similar material to that covered in CH 101-102, except this is an accelerated course. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 111 - Essentials of Chemistry I: Gen

3.00 Cr
A one-semester course in the fundamentals of general inorganic chemistry. Principal topics include atomic structure; atomic-molecular description of matter, solutions, and equilibrium; and basic calculations and measurements. Recommended for general studies students and students in nursing and health information management. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

CH 111L - Essentials of Chemistry Lab

1.00 Cr
A one-semester course in the fundamentals of general inorganic chemistry. Principal topics include atomic structure; atomic-molecular description of matter, solutions, and equilibrium; and basic calculations and measurements. Recommended for general studies students and students in nursing and health information management. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

CH 112 - Ess of Chem II:Organic/Biochm

3.00 Cr
The first portion of the course explores the structures, functions, and properties of biologically relevant organic macromolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes. From there, the course explores the genetic control of biochemical processes, control of cell division and cell death, the biochemistry of cancer, and how pharmaceuticals are developed to treat disease. Finally, the course explores bioenergetics and metabolic processes that provide the energy for life. A major consideration is how these processes interface with health and disease. Recommended for students in nursing. Three lectures per week; no laboratory.

CH 205 - Quantitative Analysis

4.00 Cr
A detailed study of analytical chemistry focusing on classical methods of chemical analysis in systems at equilibrium. Topics covered include measurement and concentration, experimental error and uncertainty in chemical analysis, statistical analysis of laboratory data, solubility equilibria, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction chemistry, complexometric reactions, phase equilibrium, activity, electrochemistry, potentiometry, and the interaction of light with matter. These areas are studied in the context of analytical laboratory techniques, including volumetric analysis, titrimetry, gravimetry, chromatography and spectrophotometry. Basic issues of chemical hygiene are also covered. The laboratory stresses good laboratory technique through the quantitative analysis of unknown samples by classical and modern methods. Three 50-minute lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week.

CH 301 - Organic Chemistry I

3.00 Cr
This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence intended to provide a comprehensive study of the chemistry of carbon-containing (organic) compounds. Topics to be covered include conformational analysis, stereochemistry, infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and chemical reactivity associated with the following types of organic compounds: alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, and alkynes. In addition students will be exposed to acid/base theory, chemical bonding models, thermodynamics, and kinetics as these topics apply to the study of organic compounds. The main of objective of this course is for students to gain a working knowledge of the aforementioned concepts in order to solve problems in organic chemistry.

CH 301L - Organic Chemistry I Lab

1.00 Cr
The objective of this course is to expose students to basic experimental techniques, practices and instrumentation common to a synthetic organic chemistry laboratory. This course will also provide some emphasis on reinforcing topics covered in CH 301.

CH 302 - Organic Chemistry II

3.00 Cr
This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence intended to provide a comprehensive study of the chemistry of carbon-containing (organic) compounds. The reactivity of the following functional groups will be covered in detail: alcohols, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acids and carboxylic acid derivatives. In addition, students will be exposed to acid/base theory, chemical bonding models, thermodynamics, and kinetics as these topics apply to the study of organic compounds. The main of objective of this course is for students to gain a working knowledge of the aforementioned concepts in order to solve problems in organic chemistry.

CH 302L - Organic Chemistry II Lab

1.00 Cr
This lab course is intended to apply experimental techniques, practices, and instrumentation covered in CH301 and CH301L to the synthesis of a research-inspired organic compound. The primary objectives of this course are for students to: (1) demonstrate proficiency in structure elucidation / verification via current spectroscopic methods (i.e. nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, etc.) and (2) gain experience in implementing a multi-step chemical synthesis of a target organic compound.

CH 306 - Instrumental Methods

3.00 Cr
An advanced overview of electronic chemical instrumentation used in chemical analysis. The course will explain instrumental design and the scientific principles underlying instrumental function. It will also cover the application of instrumental methods for the identification and quantitative determination of a variety of analytes. Instrumental techniques that will be covered include ultraviolet-visible molecular spectrophotometry, infrared molecular spectroscopy, molecular fluorescence spectroscopy, atomic spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis.

CH 311 - Spectrometric Org Structure Dt

2.00 Cr
CH 311 is a seminar-style course where students will learn to read and interpret data produced by chemistry instruments. This course is intended for chemistry majors who are planning to attend graduate school, but others who are interested in how spectrometry is used to determine structure may find this course interesting. The class will meet twice weekly at the designated time.

CH 353 - Biochemistry I

4.00 Cr
A study of the chemical principles governing biological macromolecules. Topics include protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, carbohydrates and lipids, energetics and major metabolic pathways. The laboratory will include both computer simulations and an introduction to current molecular techniques in the field. Both lecture and lab will emphasize problem solving and experimental data analysis. Three lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week.

CH 354 - Biochemistry II

4.00 Cr
This course emphasizes biochemical processes that occur in living organisms. It expands upon the material covered in CHEM 353 to include additional consideration of metabolism and how it is studied, as well as advanced topics in metabolic diseases, protein biochemistry, and enzymology. Additional topics include drug development, and the biochemistry of sensory systems, memory, and immunity. The course utilizes several tools including textbook readings, lecture, clinical case studies, evaluation of original research papers, and project-based laboratory exercises.

CH 390 - Physical Chem for Life Science

4.00 Cr
Physical chemistry for life sciences focuses on quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics as they pertain to chemical and biochemical systems. Emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of energy quantization in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. The lab includes investigations of energetics, molecular structure and reaction dynamics requiring the use of advanced instrumentation. One semester course: Three 50 minute lectures and one 3 hour lab per week.

CH 391 - Physical Chemistry

3.00 Cr
The first semester of this course (CH 391) topics include the origin, applications, and implications of quantum mechanics. Specific topics include spectroscopy (rotational, vibrational, electronic and NMR), chemical bonding, and molecular structure. The second semester (CH 392) topics include thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Through the two semesters emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics and the quantization of energy levels in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. Two semester course: Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 392 - Physical Chemistry

3.00 Cr
The first semester of this course (CH 391) topics include the origin, applications, and implications of quantum mechanics. Specific topics include spectroscopy (rotational, vibrational, electronic and NMR), chemical bonding, and molecular structure. The second semester (CH 392) topics include thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Through the two semesters emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics and the quantization of energy levels in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. Two semester course: Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 405 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

3.00 Cr
A detailed study of current topics in inorganic chemistry, including coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, homogeneous catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on orbital interactions, reactivity and reaction mechanisms of inorganic molecules. Lab covers synthesis and spectroscopy of inorganic compounds. Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 406 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

3.00 Cr
This course will provide an in-depth study of the structure, synthesis, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. The synthesis section will encompass theory, design, and methods used in modern organic synthesis. The structure and mechanistic section will cover conformational analysis, stereochemistry, molecular orbital theory as it applies to conjugated pi systems, reaction mechanisms and methods of mechanism elucidation. Original papers in current science literature will be analyzed with an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication. Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 411 - Integrated Lab I Lab

2.00 Cr
A two-course series to be taken in consecutive semesters primarily in the fourth year of study. This lab-only course integrates content from physical chemistry, instrumental methods, advanced organic, and advanced inorganic chemistry by providing research or research-like experiences. Learning outcomes are to: 1) develop advanced synthetic abilities, 2) apply modern instrumentation for data generation, 3) analyze data in light of modern theory, 4) report findings in written and oral formats, and 5) search and employ primary literature sources. Lab meets two times per week for 3.5 hours each.

CH 412 - Integrated Lab II (WI) Lab

2.00 Cr
A two-course series to be taken in consecutive semesters primarily in the fourth year of study. This lab-only course integrates content from physical chemistry, instrumental methods, advanced organic, and advanced inorganic chemistry by providing research or research-like experiences. Learning outcomes are to: 1) develop advanced synthetic abilities, 2) apply modern instrumentation for data generation, 3) analyze data in light of modern theory, 4) report findings in written and oral formats, and 5) search and employ primary literature sources. Lab meets two times per week for 3.5 hours each.

CH 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

CH 496 - Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
Senior seminar is intended for senior chemistry majors in their last semester of study. The focus of the course will be on developing the skills necessary for the effective communication required in a graduate program or a job in chemistry. Students will be required to give professional, polished oral presentations and will practice the skills of scientific writing, with particular emphasis on the style required for publication in a chemical journal.

CH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ILC 289M - Chemistry & Culture of Cuisine

4.00 Cr
This course will provide a basic understanding of the cultural and chemical makeup of food in France. The course is appropriate for students not majoring in science or French, but students in those disciplines are welcome. There is no assumption of any previous high school chemistry, but knowledge of high school algebra will be helpful. The course will satisfy both the science/lab requirement and global diversity requirement within the current core curriculum. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce the lecture topics, as well as provide valuable hands-on experience with how science is performed. All laboratory exercises will take place in a common kitchen and in the kitchens of the students' rented apartments. Laboratory activities will involve investigating basic chemical concepts through the experimentation with foods and the preparation of French dishes.