Course Descriptions

Biology Courses

BI 102 - Human Biology

4.00 Cr

An introduction to the fundamental principles common to all living organisms. Presents basic biological principles using human systems as a study model including cell biology, genetics, and physiology. A course for non-biology majors. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 121 - Fndns of Cell & Molecular Bio

3.00 Cr
Natural Science with Lab. BI 121 focuses on fundamental cellular and molecular biological concepts and methods for students planning to major in biology or for students needing to satisfy a professional school requirement in biology. This course provides a foundation for more advanced courses in the biology major's program and is a prerequisite for many other courses in the program. BI 121 is devoted to cell structure and function and to classical and molecular genetics. Bacteria and viruses are also introduced in this course.

BI 122 - Fnds Organismal & Evol Biology

3.00 Cr

Natural Science with Lab. This course focuses on fundamental biological concepts at an organismal level. It also fulfills the Natural Science core requirement and provides a foundation for more advanced courses in Biology. BI 122 is devoted to biodiversity, plant form and function, and animal form and function. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon the scientific method and upon the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information.

BI 123 - Fndns Ecology Evol Diversity

3.00 Cr
Natural Science with Lab. Foundations of Ecology, Evolution, and Diversity. This course focuses on fundamental biological concepts at an ecological level. It also fulfills the Natural Science core requirement and provides a foundation for more advanced courses in Biology. BI 123 is devoted to population genetics, evolution, ecology and biodiversity. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon the scientific method and upon the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information.

BI 131 - Cellular & Molecular BI Lab

1.00 Cr
Natural Science with Lab. Lab Explorations in Cellular and Molecular Biology. The overarching goal of this lab exploration is to provide students with hands on experience using the scientific method. Over the course of the semester, you will be exposed to the processes of experimental design, protocol development and implementation, data analysis, and the interpretation and presentation of results through the use of mini-research modules in the areas of Cellular and Molecular Biology.

BI 132 - Physiology and Ecology Lab

1.00 Cr
Natural Science with Lab. Lab Explorations Physiology and Ecology. The purpose of this course is to provide you with hands on experience of doing science at an organismal and ecological scale. Over the course of the semester you will be exposed to the processes of experimental design, field and lab protocol development and implementation, data analysis, and the interpretation and presentation of results. We will explore major themes in organismal biology and ecology including diversity, plant and animal form and function, and species interactions.

BI 201 - Intro to Human A & P I

4.00 Cr
Natural Science with Lab. A study of the morphology and physiology of the human body, both from a normal and pathological viewpoint. Three lectures and one two and one-half hour laboratory per week for 2 semesters.

BI 202 - Intro to Human A & P II

4.00 Cr
A study of the morphology and physiology of the human body, both from a normal and pathological viewpoint. Three lectures and one two and one-half hour laboratory per week for 2 semesters.

BI 214 - General Microbiology

3.00 Cr
An introductory study of microorganisms for allied health professionals (this course does not satisfy requirements of the biology major). Course includes history, taxonomy and nomenclature, morphology, physiology, nutrition, cultivation, ecology, genetics, immunity, and the roles of micro-organisms in disease and agriculture. Emphasis is on bacteria. Standard microbial methods and techniques are learned in the laboratory.

BI 214L - General Microbiology Lab

1.00 Cr
An introductory study of microorganisms for allied health professionals (this course does not satisfy requirements of the biology major). Course includes history, taxonomy and nomenclature, morphology, physiology, nutrition, cultivation, ecology, genetics, immunity, and the roles of micro-organisms in disease and agriculture. Emphasis is on bacteria. Standard microbial methods and techniques are learned in the laboratory.

BI 281 - Genetics

3.00 Cr
A study of the principles of inheritance at the organismal and molecular levels. Topics include transmission mechanisms, linkage, DNA replication, and gene expression. Current technology and research areas in genetics and their applications will also be discussed. Problem solving and experimental data analysis will be emphasized.

BI 281L - Genetics Lab

1.00 Cr
Intermediate Writing. A study of the principles of inheritance at the organismal and molecular levels. The laboratory will incorporate both computational simulation methods and a hands-on introduction to current molecular genetics techniques, as well as exposure to current next-generation sequencing methods and technology. The scientific method, problem solving, experimental data analysis, and scientific communication will be emphasized.

BI 305 - Microbiology

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the biology of the prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and the animal viruses. Course topics include bacterial cell structure, nutrition and metabolism, growth, genetics, traditional and molecular systematics, ecology of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, antimicrobial agents, host parasite interactions, and major infectious diseases. Current methods in bacteriology are used in the identification of bacteria and the conducting of experiments.

BI 305L - Microbiology Lab

1.00 Cr
An introduction to the biology of the prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and the animal viruses. Course topics include bacterial cell structure, nutrition and metabolism, growth, genetics, traditional and molecular systematics, ecology of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, antimicrobial agents, host parasite interactions, and major infectious diseases. Current methods in bacteriology are used in the identification of bacteria and the conducting of experiments.

BI 306 - Plant Biology

3.00 Cr
An advanced course focusing on the evolutionary history of plants, plant anatomy and physiology, and plant ecology. The topics are diverse and emphasize recognizing reproductive and anatomical differences among major plant taxa (from algae to flowering plants), learning how to identify seed plants (gymnosperms and angiosperms)to the family level, and phyisological and ecological functions of plants.

BI 307 - Animal Physiology

3.00 Cr
A study of the vertebrate organ systems which are most intimately involved in maintaining homeostasis: Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Excretory. Regulation and integration of the systems will be emphasized. Individual study of assigned journal articles which complement the lecture material constitutes a major part of the learning experience. The laboratory offers the student experience using a variety of preparations and instrumentation.

BI 307L - Animal Physiology Lab

1.00 Cr
A study of the vertebrate organ systems which are most intimately involved in maintaining homeostasis: Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Excretory. Regulation and integration of the systems will be emphasized. Individual study of assigned journal articles which complement the lecture material constitutes a major part of the learning experience. The laboratory offers the student experience using a variety of preparations and instrumentation.

BI 311 - Ecology

3.00 Cr
An advanced course focusing on the principles of the interactions and relationships among organisms and between organisms and their environment. The topics combine basic ecological foundations such as population growth and competition with applied ecology in fields of importance such as forestry, agriculture, climate change, and conservation.

BI 311L - Ecology Lab

1.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing on the basic principles of the interactions and relationships among organisms and between organisms and their environment. The laboratory includes field observations, computer simulations, and statistical analysis of experimental data.

BI 312 - Global Change Ecology

3.00 Cr
This course will provide a scientific foundation for understanding the causes and effects of major types of human-caused global change. Topics will include anthropogenic climate change, land-use change, nutrient cycling, invasive species, and others. The course will introduce students to global-scale ecological questions and research methods through a focus on current primary research. Students will also be introduced to the links between global change sciences and other disciplines through the discussion of possible solutions to these human-caused problems.

BI 323 - Comparative Anatomy

3.00 Cr
A comparative study of the evolution of the anatomical structures of vertebrates. The course will emphasize the basic structures of vertebrates, the functional role of anatomical structures, and the adaptive changes that have occurred in vertebrate evolution.

BI 323L - Comparative Anatomy Lab

1.00 Cr
A comparative study of the evolution of the anatomical structures of vertebrates. The course will emphasize the basic structures of vertebrates, the functional role of anatomical structures, and the adaptive changes that have occurred in vertebrate evolution.

BI 329 - Molecular Biology

3.00 Cr
This course covers the molecular basis of biological activity through in-depth study of DNA. RNA and protein biosynthesis, regulation, and functional interactions. Particular emphasis is placed on the processes of DNA replication and repair, RNA transcription and processing, protein synthesis and post-translational modifications, and the regulation of gene expression. Students will also be introduced to various cell and molecular laboratory techniques, including PCR, gel electrophoresis, cloning, DNA sequencing, bacterial transformation, and gene knockouts. In addition to learning the fundamentals of how the cell works at the molecular level, students in this course will also be exposed to primary research articles within this area of study.

BI 329L - Molecular Biology Lab

1.00 Cr
This lab course explores the interaction between the environment and gene expression in the single-celled protist, Tetrahymena thermophila. Students enrolled in this course will design an independent research project devoted to understanding how a particular environmental stressor impacts gene expression and behavior in Tetrahymena. To facilitate this investigation, students will be exposed to various molecular and cellular techniques including cell culture, RNA extraction, Reverse Transcription and quantitative PCR, as well as a variety of growth and feeding assays. Students in this course will also gain experience in researching a particular area of study, developing a scientific research proposal, and preparing a poster presentation based on their final results.

BI 346 - Biomechanics

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to fundamental anatomical and mechanical principles and their application to biological systems to understand organismal movement. Emphasis will be placed on the biomechanics of the human body and movement. Topics will include biological tissue form and function, mechanical properties of biological tissues, kinematics, and kinetics.

BI 346L - Biomechanics Lab

1.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to fundamental anatomical and mechanical principles and their application to biological systems to understand organismal movement. Emphasis will be placed on the biomechanics of the human body and movement. Topics will include biological tissue form and function, mechanical properties of biological tissues, kinematics, and kinetics. The laboratory will expose students to basic experimental tools and techniques for biomechanical applications.

BI 350 - Developmental Biology

3.00 Cr
Developmental biology is a field concerned with the progressive changes that result in the formation of a multicellular organism. The nature of the changes and when, where, and how they occur are all included within Developmental biology's scope. This course focuses on the changes that occur during the embryonic period, broadly defined as the period extending from fertilization to birth or hatching in animals. The course includes both a survey of the anatomical changes that occur during this period and an examination of the molecular and cellular mechanisms thought to be responsible for bringing these changes about. Students in this course will also be exposed to the primary research within the field of Developmental Biology.

BI 369 - Cell & Molecular Neuroscience

3.00 Cr
This course explores the cellular and molecular biology of the nervous system. Topics covered include the cellular and anatomical organization of the nervous system, electrical signaling, synaptic transmission, neurotransmitters and receptors, and synaptic plasticity. Students in this course will also be exposed to a wide variety of primary literature related to field of cellular and molecular Neuroscience.

BI 369L - Cell&MolecularNeuroscienceLab

1.00 Cr
This lab course explores the interaction between the environment and behavior in the model organism, Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly). Students enrolled in this course will design an independent research project devoted to understanding how a particular environmental stressor impacts behavior in Drosophila. To facilitate this investigation, students will be exposed to various behavioral assays and fly culturing techniques. Students in this course will also gain experience in researching a particular area of study, developing a scientific research proposal, and preparing a poster presentation based on their final results.

BI 370 - Evolutionary Analysis

3.00 Cr
This course explores the underlying principles of evolutionary change (natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow) from an analytical perspective. The relevance of evolutionary change to real world concerns is emphasized while traditional and modem methods of analysis are explored and evaluated.

BI 370L - Evolutionary Analysis Lab

1.00 Cr
This laboratory experience explores some of the molecular methods used to study principles of evolutionary change. The laboratory will include hands-on experience with molecular techniques (including exposure to current next-generation sequencing technology) and phylogenetic analysis using real world experimental datasets. The scientific method, data analysis, interpretation within an evolutionary context, and scientific communication will be emphasized.

BI 382 - Cell Biology

3.00 Cr
This upper-division course focuses on the cell as the basic unit of structure and function in living things. Topics include cellular organization, the structures and functions of cellular organelles and the cytoskeleton, energy transformations, communication between cells, and the cell cycle. Methods used to study cells and their component parts will be introduced through critical reading of peer-reviewed journal articles. Lectures will integrate material from genetics, chemistry, and introductory biology to understand cellular processes.

BI 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BI 389L - Biology Lab Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BI 390 - Research Exp Plant Ecology WI

2.00 Cr
Advanced Writing. Research Experience in Plant Ecology. The primary goal of an Advanced Research Experience (ARE) is to engage all students in an authentic research opportunity as part of their undergraduate course work. Throughout the ARE course, students will be tasked with designing and implementing experiments to test a novel hypothesis that builds upon an area of knowledge. During the analysis process, collected data will be evaluated using descriptive and inferential statistics in order to develop meaningful conclusions. At the end of the ARE, each group will disseminate their findings to a broader audience through the presentation of their research project at Carroll's Student Undergraduate Research Festival. Furthermore, these projects will be uploaded to Carroll's Institutional Repository where they will be available to the general population. Each 2-credit ARE course will consist of two 3 hour labs per week.

BI 391 - Research Exp Molecular Bio WI

2.00 Cr
Advanced Writing. Research Experience in Molecular Biology. The primary goal of an Advanced Research Experience (ARE) is to engage all students in an authentic research opportunity as part of their undergraduate course work. Throughout the ARE course, students will be tasked with designing and implementing experiments to test a novel hypothesis that builds upon an area of knowledge. During the analysis process, collected data will be evaluated using descriptive and inferential statistics in order to develop meaningful conclusions. At the end of the ARE, each group will disseminate their findings to a broader audience through the presentation of their research project at Carroll's Student Undergraduate Research Festival. Furthermore, these projects will be uploaded to Carroll's Institutional Repository where they will be available to the general population. Each 2-credit ARE course will consist of two 3 hour labs per week.

BI 392 - Cell Molecular Neurosci WI

2.00 Cr
Advanced Writing. Research Experience in Cell & Molecular Neuroscience. The primary goal of an Advanced Research Experience (ARE) is to engage all students in an authentic research opportunity as part of their undergraduate course work. Throughout the ARE course, students will be tasked with designing and implementing experiments to test a novel hypothesis that builds upon an area of knowledge. During the analysis process, collected data will be evaluated using descriptive and inferential statistics in order to develop meaningful conclusions. At the end of the ARE, each group will disseminate their findings to a broader audience through the presentation of their research project at Carroll's Student Undergraduate Research Festival. Furthermore, these projects will be uploaded to Carroll's Institutional Repository where they will be available to the general population. Each 2-credit ARE course will consist of two 3 hour labs per week.

BI 393 - CellularMechanotransductionWI

2.00 Cr

Research Experience in Cellular Mechanotransduction. The primary goal of an Advanced Research Experience (ARE) is to engage all students in an authentic research opportunity as part of their undergraduate course work. Throughout the ARE course, students will be tasked with designing and implementing experiments to test a novel hypothesis that builds upon an area of knowledge. During the analysis process, collected data will be evaluated using descriptive and inferential statistics in order to develop meaningful conclusions. At the end of the ARE, each group will disseminate their findings to a broader audience through the presentation of their research project at Carroll's Student Undergraduate Research Festival. Furthermore, these projects will be uploaded to Carroll's Institutional Repository where they will be available to the general population. Each 2-credit ARE course will consist of two 3 hour labs per week.

BI 394 - Res Exp Animal Physiology WI

2.00 Cr
Advanced Writing. Research Experience in Animal Physiology. The primary goal of an Advanced Research Experience (ARE) is to engage all students in an authentic research opportunity as part of their undergraduate course work. Throughout the ARE course, students will be tasked with designing and implementing experiments to test a novel hypothesis that builds upon an area of knowledge. During the analysis process, collected data will be evaluated using descriptive and inferential statistics in order to develop meaningful conclusions. At the end of the ARE, each group will disseminate their findings to a broader audience through the presentation of their research project at Carroll's Student Undergraduate Research Festival. Furthermore, these projects will be uploaded to Carroll's Institutional Repository where they will be available to the general population. Each 2-credit ARE course will consist of two 3 hour labs per week.

BI 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Experiences recognize that learning can take place outside the classroom. Carroll College allows its students to participate in opportunities that relate to their area of study. This opportunity must relate directly a student's program of study in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation among Carroll and the participating organizations ensures an experience that contributes significantly to the student's overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of faculty internship advisor and/or department chair, Career Services, and a site supervisor. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours to degree requirements; academic departments will determine the number of credits that may count toward the major (most majors accept 6 hours total). Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and Career Services prior to the start of an experience.

BI 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

BI 496 - Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
Readings and discussion of significant past and current literature.

BI 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.