Course Descriptions

Anthrozoology Courses

ANZ 107 - Introduction to Anthrozoology

3.00 Cr
Social Science. Anthrozoology is the study of the interactions and relationships between humans and non-human animals. Central to this course will be an exploration of the ways in which animal lives intersect with human societies. This course is designed to bring into the realm of sociological inquiry the relationships that exist between humans and other animals. A major focus will be on the social construction of animals in American culture and the way in which these social meanings are used to perpetuate hierarchical human/human relationships such as racism, sexism, and class privilege. Animal/human interaction in several major social institutions will be studied. We will also examine how different human groups construct a range of identities for themselves and for others through animals. Finally, we will examine several of the major philosophical positions about human social policy regarding the future of animal/human relations. This high impact course includes field trips. This is a required class for the major and minor in Anthrozoology and a prerequisite for ANZ 108, and is open admission as social science Core class. This is the first step toward preparing the students for a multitude of careers encompassing humans and animals.

ANZ 108 - Survey of Animals in Society

3.00 Cr
The main objective of this course is to expose students broadly to the many and varied ways that animals interact with human society to improve the well-being of communities, educate, sustain, and build social capital. This course embodies a partnership between Carroll College and various organizations and individuals in the greater Helena area and the State of Montana. These entities and individuals will discuss with our students the important work performed with animals that share their lives. In addition, students will have the opportunity to provide service to the community through a group project using human-animal interaction to improve the well-being of communities. This high impact course includes field trips.

ANZ 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 221 - Familiar Canine

3.00 Cr
This course explores the history and evolution of the relations between domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and humans. The course covers a wide range of topics on dogs including: genetics, anatomy and physiology, behavior, cognition, domestication, and cross-cultural relationships. The course will also involve direct observations and interactions with dogs. Students should develop skills and knowledge to properly care for and provide a healthy environment for dogs as well as understand the cause of basic health and behavior problems. This course includes a field trip to Yellowstone National Park.

ANZ 231 - Hist Perspec: Horses & Humans

3.00 Cr
This is an introductory course on the relationship between horses and humans in the outer physical world and the inner psychological world. We will investigate this relationship from an historical perspective. We will assess this evolving relationship from the point of view of two main questions: 1) What was the process of this evolution? 2) How does this process inform us about our relationship with horses today?

ANZ 233 - Connecting With Horses

2.00 Cr
his class will provide hands-on experiences with horses. The two main goals of this course are connection and safety. Horses are large sentient beings with minds and independent wills. Relationships with horses can lead to very powerful, exciting and rewarding experiences. Establishing this type of relationship is critical for therapeutic interventions through Equine Assisted Services, and working with horses as a veterinarian, equine facilities manager or owner. Horses crave safety, a primary goal of this course is to learn how to keep you, other people and horses safe both physically and psychologically during interactions with each other. There is no "right" way to build meaningful relationships with horses. However, there are procedures and practices for communicating with horses that are likely to produce positive outcomes and that are based in Learning Theory. The most important being: 1) observational skills, 2) knowledge of horse behavior, 3) positive and negative reinforcement, and 4) interpretations of intention and emotions; both your own and that of the horse. The lab will provide guidance and opportunities to learn these important equestrian skills. You will be observing and interacting with horses through guided exercises to promote the development of the above skills. This will include herd observations, working with individually assigned horses, observing and working with your classmates who are engaging with horses.

ANZ 240 - Cross-Cultural Anthrozoology

3.00 Cr
Cultural Diversity. Social Science. This course provides a tool for critical evaluation of human-animal interactions from the perspectives of anthropology and anthrozoology. Anthrozoology is the study of the relationship between human and nonhuman animals. Animals play profoundly important roles in the lives of humans, whether as companion, food, spiritual guide, symbol, totemic ancestor or family member. All human interactions with animals and nature take place within a cultural context. Since culture is a central concept of anthropology, this discipline provides an effective theoretical perspective for studying human-animal relationships. In this course we consider the symbolic, economic, ecological, and social consequences of human/non-human animal interaction in a variety of cross-cultural contexts. A global perspective is used to help students better understand world trends regarding modernization and its consequences to animals and their habitats. This course provides a cross-cultural understanding of the concept of the animal by examining how our relationships with animals are mediated by culture, and thus how belief systems contribute to current animal, human, and environmental social problems.

ANZ 252 - Wild Animals and Society

3.00 Cr
This course engages students in an exploration of the meaning and value of connecting with wild animals. It provides a comprehensive and foundational examination of the interactions people have with wild animals, and complements the current course offerings in Anthrozoology pertaining to human interactions with domesticated animals. This course draws on readings from a variety of backgrounds to frame the human-wildlife connection as an expression of our desire to interact and connect with nature. This is a way to help overcome the growing separation of humans and nature, and will advance the wellbeing of people and wildlife. The goal is for students to increase their personal effectiveness in the field of Anthrozoology through a greater understanding of diverse perspectives that people hold toward wildlife issues. Students will work on their own and in groups to identify solutions to contemporary wildlife issues and policies that have at their core diverging perspectives of the value and significance of wildlife. Students will learn and practice the scientific method by conducting a social science survey to explore people's views of wildlife.

ANZ 268 - Humans, Animals, and Nature

3.00 Cr
Ethical Reasoniong. Faith and Resaon Theology. Humans, Animals, and Nature: Ecologies of Religion. This course explores the relations between humans, animals, and nature as those relationships are depicted, understood, and influenced by religious thought and practice. Religion builds human self-understanding by providing answers to questions such as: "What are animals? What are they for? What are humans and what are we for? How should we live together on the land?" The specific answers given to these questions as well the way those answers are put into practice has varied substantially across history and culture. The course focuses on Christian theology, but other religious traditions are engaged in a comparative manner as well.

ANZ 289 - Special Topic

3.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 289CD - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Cultural Diversity. Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 289IW - Special Topic

3.00 Cr
Intermediate Writing. Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 309 - Research Methods in ANZ (WI)

4.00 Cr
Advanced Writing. This course introduces students to qualitative, quantitative and mixed-method research methods. Students will learn about the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) and their vital applications to the field of Anthrozoology. The class will focus on designing effective research studies, analyzing data, multi-species considerations, and critical thinking skills so that students can meaningfully evaluate research claims. Students will participate in activities exposing them to qualitative, quantitative and interpretive research techniques. Reviewed literature will focus on Anthrozoology topics, with an emphasis on growing areas including One Health, human-animal bond research, intersectionality with animals, human-animal conflict resolution, and multi-species ethnography. Students will investigate an anthrozoological topic of their choosing, develop a thesis, conduct a thorough literature review, conduct data collection, and complete a comprehensive research paper. Research projects including interactions with human/animal subjects will seek IRB/IACUC approval.

ANZ 321 - Citizen Canine

3.00 Cr
Continuing where Familiar Canine left off, students will apply and expand on their knowledge of canine related topics to the dogs in their community. Learning theory, cognition, antecedent arrangement, applied behavior analysis, animal sheltering, and the animal training profession will be major focuses of the course. Special attention will be made on topics including human-animal attachment, communication, expectations, conflict, and compassion fatigue. Working with assigned dogs is required for completion of assignments. Fostering a dog is optional (see ANZ 321L 1 or 2 credits). This course includes both written and oral evaluation techniques to assess student learning.

ANZ 321L - Citizen Canine W/ a Dog Lab

2.00 Cr
This lab is for those students who foster and train an assigned dog or participate in training while not fostering. Students enroll for 2 credits when fostering. Must be enrolled in ANZ 321 and have consent of the instructor to foster a dog. Students fostering enroll for 2-credits.

ANZ 322 - Community Canine

3.00 Cr
This course applies the knowledge and skills acquired in ANZ 321 and applies them to the working canine world. The different training, function, professionalism, and practices of a variety of specialized work will be examined and evaluated, including service dogs, therapy animal work, sport dog work, search and rescue, conservation scent detection, and military/police work. Human and animal protections including federal (ADA) and state laws will be discussed. A critical evaluation of training methods, animal labor, and the intersections of canine training and society is an essential part of the course. Multiple guests will join the class to discuss practical applications of canine training, including highlighting career options, discussing working with clients with special needs, and further developing an understanding of the human-canine bond. Fostering a dog is optional (see ANZ 322L 1 or 2 credits). This course includes both written and oral evaluation techniques.

ANZ 322L - Community Canine Lab

2.00 Cr
This lab is a continuation of ANZ 321L for those students who foster and train an assigned dog or participate in training while not fostering. Students enroll for 2 credits fostering.

ANZ 332 - Equine Science:Nature Horses

4.00 Cr
This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the horse and is designed to provide students more in-depth information about horse behavior, physiology, and wellness. Understanding the nature of horses contributes to their care and management. Understanding their physical needs and social behavior contributes to a safe and rewarding relationship with these animals. This class is designed to teach students about horses including their care and management. Must be taken concurrently with ANZ 332L.

ANZ 388 - ANZ Teaching Assistantship

1.00 Cr
The teaching assistantship course provides students with a unique opportunity to apply the skills required in their Anthrozoology course to a real world setting. Students will participate in instructing other students while they learn about anthrozoology and work with horses and dogs. They will provide faculty support in lecture based classes or experiential labs. They will receive increasing levels of responsibility as the semester progresses. This is excellent preparation for graduate school or a student's chosen profession.

ANZ 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 421 - Specialized Canine Training

2.00 Cr
This sequence of courses (ANZ421/422) is an optional extension of ANZ321/322. In ANZ421/422 students raise a second dog for another specialized task chosen by the student. Students will employ the training skills they learned in ANZ321/322 and function as a more independent trainer. Most of the training will occur on the student's own time. Regular weekly meetings to ensure meaningful training progress, to address any problems that arise, and to train in a more distracting setting. ANZ421 is the first semester of the two-semester sequence. Students must enroll in both ANZ 421 and ANZ 422.

ANZ 422 - Specialized Canine Training

2.00 Cr
This sequence of courses (ANZ421/422) is an optional extension of ANZ321/322. In ANZ421/422 students raise a second dog for another specialized task chosen by the student. Students will employ the training skills they learned in ANZ321/322 and function as a more independent trainer. Most of the training will occur on the student's own time. Regular weekly meetings to ensure meaningful training progress, to address any problems that arise, and to train in a more distracting setting.

ANZ 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Experiences recognize that learning can take place outside the classroom. Carroll College allows its students to participate in opportunities that relate to their area of study. This opportunity must relate directly a student's program of study in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation among Carroll and the participating organizations ensures an experience that contributes significantly to the student's overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of faculty internship advisor and/or department chair, Career Services, and a site supervisor. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours to degree requirements; academic departments will determine the number of credits that may count toward the major (most majors accept 6 hours total). Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and Career Services prior to the start of an experience.

ANZ 431 - Equine Assisted Services

1.00 Cr
Modalities in Equine Assisted Services. This course will explore a variety of methods for partnering with horses for therapy, learning and horsemanship. A major focus will be on Equine-Assisted/Facilitated Learning in education, in organizations and in personal development. Equine-Assisted Therapies including Physical, Occupational, Mental Health and Speech-Language Pathology will be investigated. Horsemanship, including adaptive equestrian sports, adaptive/therapeutic riding, driving and interactive vaulting will be discussed. Additionally, students will explore the ethical dilemmas and issues facing incorporating horses in human services, as well as the current best practice standards for the welfare of the horse. Finally, students will review the current state of research and what is needed for the future.

ANZ 431L - Equine Assisted Services Lab

2.00 Cr
Modalities in Equine Assisted Services Lab. This course is the lab component to ANZ 431.

ANZ 441 - Animal Behavior

3.00 Cr
In this class students will learn how scientists investigate and interpret the reason and the causes of animal behaviors. There are four general approaches to the study of animal behavior including: evolutionary, ontogenetic, proximate mechanisms, and functional consequences. Students will learn how to apply these different approaches to the study of both domestic and wild animals. The development of normal and abnormal behavior will be an important component of this course.

ANZ 442 - The Science of Animal Welfare

3.00 Cr
This course will explore issues involving the use of animals in agriculture, science, education and society. Students will examine the scientific research involved in understanding and improving domestic animal welfare and the philosophical positions on the use of animals. Topics addressed will include the physiological components of animal well-being, the concept of quality of life, the history of the humane movement, and the changing role of animals in society. The course will include reading, discussion, critical thinking, literature searches and student presentations.

ANZ 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is a unique learning opportunity not offered in the regular curriculum or an existing Carroll course offered to a student in special circumstances. Only junior and senior students may enroll in an independent study. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

ANZ 486 - Independent Research in ANZ

1.00 Cr
This is an individualized instruction course through which a student engages in an advanced research topic chosen in conjunction with an Anthrozoology Department faculty member. Regular conferences with the supervising faculty are required. Credits are variable. May be repeated for credit.

ANZ 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ILC 357 - Animal & Human Geography&Hist

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Arts & Letters-History and Social Science.

A Shared Space - Animal and Human Geography and History.

This course focuses on an examination of how spatially situated human-animal relations have changed through time. Looking critically at the relationships that exist among people, animals, and the landscape this course engages students in the study of the ways in which interrelationshipss between humans and animals have been constructed over time and space. It also illustrates how the study of animals - past, present, even mythical - demands critical analyses of the three main fields it brings together, anthrozoology, history, and geography, enriching all three.