Course Descriptions

Environmental Science Courses

AN 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

AN 204 - Cultural Anthropology (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to culture as a framework for understanding similarities and differences in behavior and values in human societies. The class will look at communities and cultures from around the globe to give a cross-cultural understanding of human behavior.

AN 205 - Human Ecology

3.00 Cr
This class will focus on how humans interact with their environment, concentrating on biological, social and economic aspects. The course will investigate the principles of evolutionary theory with special emphasis on human behavior and cultural diversity. The class will examine adaptive design of traits, behaviors, and life histories of humans in an ecological context, including the role of social and cultural factors in the maintenance or disruption of ecosystems, contemporary ecological concerns and conservation ecology.

AN 208 - The Family (ND)

3.00 Cr
An anthropological and sociological investigation of the marriage and family institutions in various cultures and their influences upon both individuals and social organizations. Analysis of family communications; one?s choices in relationships; parenting; life transitions; and the roles of gender, property, power, and love in marriage and family.

AN 218 - Intro Native Am Studies (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course covers a broad range of prehistoric, historic, and cultural issues pertaining to American Indians. The course will cover diversity among tribes including political organization, social organization, economics, subsistence, and current issues.

AN 245 - Physical Anthropology

3.00 Cr
Physical anthropology is the study of the biocultural diversity in humans. The interaction between culture and biology produces a variety of human adaptations that are traced through the following venues: Primate fossil records, primate and human behavior, and human biological variation.

AN 317 - Ethnic & Racial Relations(ND)

3.00 Cr
An anthropological and sociological examination of ethnic and racial relations and identities within and between different socio-cultural groups. This includes an analysis of beliefs about ethnicity and race, focusing on their development through historical processes.

AN 318 - North American Archaeology-GD

3.00 Cr
This class will explore major methods and theories archeologists use to explore North American prehistory from their origins to the present. Regional diversity in tribal adaptations and lifeways are explored by using examples from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology.

AN 320 - Skeletal Forensics

3.00 Cr
Forensic Anthropology (skeletal forensics) is the use of Biological and Physical Anthropology techniques, methods and theory related to human identification and death investigations. This course will introduce basic knowledge of the human skeleton and basic terms and principles of forensic anthropology including recovery of skeletal remains and reconstructing biological profiles (age, sex, stature, ancestry). The course will also discuss the responsibilities and ethical considerations of working with human skeletal materials.

AN 325 - Violence Around the World

3.00 Cr
This class will explore the roots of violence including biological, psychological, social and anthropological aspects so that the student can deepen their understanding of the complexities of violence. The class will explore many dimensions of violence including warfare, domestic violence, political violence and religious violence comparing these across cultures around the world. The class will also explore ways to control and prevent various features of violence.

AN 331 - Social Sci Rsrch Methods(WI)

3.00 Cr
An overview of the principles, methods, and practice of research in the social sciences. The course will assist students in research design, case studies, conducting field research, analyzing and evaluating their research data, conducting needs assessment, program evaluation, and practice effectiveness.

AN 341 - Archaeological Field School

4.00 Cr
The Carroll College Archaeological Field School will introduce students to basic archaeological field methods and research design. The 2-week class is designed to train students in the fundamentals of archaeological excavation and survey techniques. Students should be prepared for full days of digging and/or hiking, sometimes in remote areas.

AN 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

AN 496 - Capstone Project

3.00 Cr
The Capstone Project consists of individualized instruction through which students engage in advance anthropological research (cultural anthropology, physical anthropology or archaeology). The student may conduct original research in conjunction with Anthropology faculty or may review, compile and analyze existing research. A weekly meeting with supervising faculty is required.

AN 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ANZ 107 - Introduction to Anthrozoology

3.00 Cr
Anthrozoology is the study of the interactions and relationships between humans and non-human animals. In this class we explore the evolution of the roles that non-human animals play in human society, considering the benefits that we humans receive and the responsibilities we have toward other species. We discuss the research that unveils the amazing health benefits humans accrue when they share their lives with other species, learning about the psychological, sociological, and physiological factors involved. We will become familiar with the many services animals provide for humans beyond food and labor. This high impact course includes field trips. This is a required class for the major and minor in Anthrozoology and a prerequisite for ANZ 108, and is open admission as social science Core class. This is the first step toward preparing the students for a multitude of careers in which animals play an important role.

ANZ 108 - Survey of Animals in Service

3.00 Cr
The main objective of this course is to expose students broadly to the many and varied ways that animals provide service for humans and interact with human society to improve the well-being of communities and build social capital. This course embodies a partnership between Carroll College and various organizations and individuals in the greater Helena area and the State of Montana. These entities and individuals will discuss with our students the important work performed by the animals that share their lives. In addition students will have the opportunity to provide service to the community through a group project using human-animal interaction to improve the well-being of communities. This high impact course includes field trips.

ANZ 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 202 - Learning & Cognition

3.00 Cr
Learning is a relatively permanent change in behavior and mental associations due to experience. Numerous principles and theories about learning have been proposed in order to better understand why animals, including humans, behave the way they do. Research in learning has resulted in the development of behavioral techniques that are useful in many allied fields including behavioral neuroscience, psychopharmacology and behavioral medicine. Cognition, on the other hand, is the study of mental operations that support acquisition and use of knowledge. The study of learning and cognition is an integral sub discipline within the field of anthrozoology. This course serves as an introduction to the multifaceted processes involved in learning at all levels of complexity. Students will learn fundamental information required for canine training classes and information that will prove useful for all animal training.

ANZ 221 - Canine Science: Nature of Dog

3.00 Cr
This course explores the history and evolution of the relations between domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and humans. The course will largely focus on the developmental lifespan of dogs and will emphasize the following topics: genetics/breeds, anatomy and physiology, sensation, behavior, and cognition. The course will also involve direct observations and interactions with dogs. Critical evaluation of research and training in canine science is an essential component of the course. An understanding of basic care, including safety, nutrition, and socialization are goals of the course. Students should develop skills and knowledge to properly care for and provide a healthy environment for various types of dogs. This course includes a field trip to Yellowstone National Park.

ANZ 231 - Hist Perspec: Horses & Humans

3.00 Cr
This is an introductory course on the relationship between horses and humans in the outer physical world and the inner psychological world. We will investigate this relationship from an historical perspective. We will assess this evolving relationship from the point of view of two main questions: 1) What was the process of this evolution? 2) How does this process inform us about our relationship with horses today?

ANZ 233 - Basic Equine Skills

2.00 Cr
Connecting With Horses: Basic Equine Skills. This class will provide hands-on experiences with horses. The primary goal is to learn how to keep you, other people and horses safe both physically and psychologically during interactions with each other. Horses are large sentient beings with minds and independent wills. Relationships with horses can become very powerful, exciting and rewarding experiences. There is no right way to build meaningful relationships with horses. However, there are procedures and practices for communicating with horses that are likely to produce positive outcomes and that are based in Learning Theory. The most important being: 1) observational skills, 2) knowledge of horse behavior, 3) positive and negative reinforcement, and 4) interpretations of intention and emotions; both your own and that of the horse. The lab will provide guidance and opportunities to perfect these important equestrian skills. You will be observing and interacting with horses through guided exercises to promote the development of the above skills. This will include herd observations, working with individually assigned horses, observing, and working with your classmates who are engaging with horses.

ANZ 252 - Wild Animals and Society

3.00 Cr
This course engages students in an exploration of the meaning and value of connecting with wild animals. It provides a comprehensive and founda - tional examination of the interactions people have with wild animals, and complements the current course offerings in Anthrozoology pertaining to human interactions with domesticated animals. This course draws on read - ings from a variety of backgrounds to frame the human-wildlife connection as an expression of our desire to interact and connect with nature. This is a way to help overcome the growing separation of humans and nature, and will advance the wellbeing of people and wildlife. The goal is for students to increase their personal effectiveness in the field of Anthrozoology through a greater understanding of diverse perspectives that people hold toward wildlife issues. Students will work on their own and in groups to identify solutions to contemporary wildlife issues and policies that have at their core diverging perspectives of the value and significance of wildlife. Students will learn and practice the scientific method by conducting a social science survey to explore people's views of wildlife.

ANZ 289 - Special Topic

3.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 321 - Intro to Canine Training

3.00 Cr
Based on information learned in Canine Science and Fundamentals of Learning, students will apply their knowledge of dog handling, care, safety, and training. During this course students have both the opportunity and responsibility for caring for and training a dog. Basic dog obedience and responsible dog ownership will be the focus of the course. Students will learn about and participate in methods used for dog selection. Key issues involved in training, such as attachment, communication, and developmental deadlines will be explored. Multiple approaches to obedience training will be discussed and evaluated. Working with assigned dogs is required and various assessments are made during the course of students' skill and knowledge regarding dog care, handling and training techniques. Fostering a dog is optional (see ANZ 321L). This course includes both written and oral evaluation techniques.

ANZ 321L - Canine Training W/ a Dog Lab

2.00 Cr
This lab is for those students who foster and train an assigned dog or participate in training while not fostering. Students enroll for 2 credits when fostering. Must be enrolled in ANZ 321 and have consent of the instructor to foster a dog. Students fostering enroll for 2-credits.

ANZ 322 - Advanced Canine Training

3.00 Cr
This course emphasized advanced training techniques. Multiple approaches to obedience training will continue to be discussed and evaluated. Critical evaluation of training methods is an essential part of the course. Different specialized training purposes are explored, such as service, therapy, scent-tracking, search and rescue, livestock use, etc. Federal (ADA) and state laws will be discussed. Career opportunities in canine science are also investigated. Program affiliates are engaged to discuss practical applications of canine training, including highlighting career options, discussing working with clients with special needs, such as those with disabilities, and further developing an understanding of the human-canine bond. Fostering a dog is optional (see ANZ 322L). This course includes both written and oral evaluation techniques.

ANZ 322L - Adv Canine Training Lab

2.00 Cr
This lab is a continuation of ANZ 321L for those students who foster and train an assigned dog or participate in training while not fostering. Students enroll for 2 credits fostering. Must be enrolled in ANZ 322.

ANZ 332 - Equine Science:Nature Horses

4.00 Cr
This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the horse and is de - signed to provide students more in-depth information about horse behavior, physiology, and wellness. Understanding the nature of horses contributes to their care and management. Understanding their physical needs and social behavior contributes to a safe and rewarding relationship with these animals. This class is designed to teach students about horses including their care and management. The laboratory component of this class is designed to provide hands-on experiences with horses. During the lab students will be taught specific skills necessary for owning a horse and helpful in working at or managing a stable. Guided instruction will be provided on topics such as first aid, vaccinations, hoof care, horse transport, care and use of tack, pasture management, feeding, manure management and equitation.

ANZ 388 - ANZ Teaching Assistantship

1.00 Cr
The teaching assistantship course provides students with a unique opportunity to apply the skills required in their Anthrozoology course to a real world setting. Students will participate in instructing other students while they learn about anthrozoology and work with horses and dogs. They will provide faculty support in lecture based classes or experiential labs. They will receive increasing levels of responsibility as the semester progresses. This is excellent preparation for graduate school or a student's chosen profession.

ANZ 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ANZ 421 - Specialized Canine Training

2.00 Cr
This sequence of courses (ANZ421/422) is an optional extension of ANZ321/322. In ANZ421/422 students raise a second dog for another specialized task chosen by the student. Students will employ the training skills they learned in ANZ321/322 and function as a more independent trainer. Most of the training will occur on the student's own time. Regular weekly meetings to ensure meaningful training progress, to address any problems that arise, and to train in a more distracting setting. ANZ421 is the first semester of the two-semester sequence. Students must enroll in both ANZ 421 and ANZ 422.

ANZ 422 - Specialized Canine Training

2.00 Cr
This sequence of courses (ANZ421/422) is an optional extension of ANZ321/322. In ANZ421/422 students raise a second dog for another specialized task chosen by the student. Students will employ the training skills they learned in ANZ321/322 and function as a more independent trainer. Most of the training will occur on the student's own time. Regular weekly meetings to ensure meaningful training progress, to address any problems that arise, and to train in a more distracting setting.

ANZ 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

ANZ 431 - Equine Asst Actvts & Therapies

1.00 Cr
This course studies the variety of methods used in partnering equines and humans for physiological and psychological benefit. Hippotherapy, therapeutic riding, and equine assisted/facilitated mental health services will be investigated. In addition ethics, standards, training, and research will be examined. This condensed course has an on-line component.

ANZ 431L - Equine Asst Actvts & Therapies

2.00 Cr
This course is the lab component to ANZ 431. This course studies the variety of methods used in partnering equines and humans for physiological and psychological benefit. Hippotherapy, therapeutic riding, and equine assisted/facilitated mental health services will be investigated. In addition ethics, standards, training, and research will be examined.

ANZ 441 - Animal Behavior(WI)

3.00 Cr
In this class students will learn how scientists investigate and interpret the reason and the causes of animal behaviors. There are four general approaches to the study of animal behavior including: evolutionary, ontogenetic, proximate mechanisms, and functional consequences. Students will learn how to apply these different approaches to the study of both domestic and wild animals. The development of normal and abnormal behavior will be an important component of this course. Students will receive systematic instruction in writing through conducting a literature review. Students will gather, review, and synthesize pertinent literature to explain the underlying mechanism responsible for why and how an animal species behaves in a particular way. Students will serve as peer reviewers as well as authors for this assignment. Multiple drafts will culminate in one major paper at the end of the semester.

ANZ 442 - The Science of Animal Welfare

3.00 Cr
This course will explore issues involving the use of animals in agriculture, science, education and society. Students will examine the scientific research involved in understanding and improving domestic animal welfare and the philosophical positions on the use of animals. Topics addressed will include the physiological components of animal well-being, the concept of quality of life, the history of the humane movement, and the changing role of animals in society. The course will include reading, discussion, critical thinking, literature searches and student presentations.

ANZ 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is a unique learning opportunity not offered in the regular curriculum or an existing Carroll course offered to a student in special circumstances. Only junior and senior students may enroll in an independent study. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

ANZ 486 - Independent Research in ANZ

1.00 Cr
This is an individualized instruction course through which a student engages in an advanced research topic chosen in conjunction with an Anthrozoology Department faculty member. Regular conferences with the supervising faculty are required. Credits are variable. May be repeated for credit.

ANZ 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

AR 101MM - Beginning Arabic I

4.00 Cr
This level is designed for those who have little or no background knowledge in Arabic. Students will learn to read and write using the Arabic alphabet; they will also learn to conduct simple conversations for use in everyday situations.

AR 102MM - Beginning Arabic II

4.00 Cr
This level is designed for those who have little or no background knowledge in Arabic. Students will learn to read and write using the Arabic alphabet; they will also learn to conduct simple conversations for use in everyday situations. AR 101MM or demonstrated proficiency.

AR 111MM - Intro to Moroccan Arabic

1.00 Cr
Darija is how Moroccans refer to their dialect of the Arabic language. Over the centuries it has incorporated words and structures from a variety of native and neighboring languages although Arabic remains at the core. Darija is a spoken language and has not typically been considered in a written context. For this reason today one can find Darija written commonly in both Arabic and Latin script. Darija is spoken by about 90% of Moroccans today accounting for about 30 million people. This course is meant for English speaking students in order to introduce Darija's basic phonetics, vocabulary and core grammatical structures.

AR 201MM - Intermediate Arabic I

4.00 Cr
Intermediate Arabic I is the first semester of Intermediate -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters Nine through Fourteen of Al-Kitaab (Part 1). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward.

AR 202MM - Intermediate Arabic II

4.00 Cr
Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II is the second semester of Intermediate -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters Fifteen through twenty (Part One) of Al-Kitaab. The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward. Students will focus on acquiring more vocabulary and an increased knowledge of the fundamental grammatical and morphological structures in order for them to attain a higher level of comprehending and communicating.

AR 301MM - Advanced Arabic I

4.00 Cr
Advanced Arabic I is the first semester of Advanced -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will expand and further develop the students understanding and effective use of Modern Standard Arabic, focusing on Chapters one through four of Al-Kitaab (Part 2). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward.

AR 302MM - Advanced Arabic II

4.00 Cr
Advanced Arabic II is the second semester of Advanced -level Modern Standard Arabic. The course will be based and focus on Chapters five through eight of Al-Kitaab (Part 2). The number of chapters covered may be increased if the students exhibit sufficient progress and proficiency in their studies to move forward. This course is designed for students who have completed all chapters in Al-Kitaab (Part 1) and the first four chapters in (Part 2).

ART 112 - Drawing

3.00 Cr
This is a studio course in basic realistic drawing. Emphasis is on visual thought and awareness through drawing exercises and portraits. Accuracy in representing what is observed is stressed. Students are required to spend at least six hours per week outside of class on assignments.

ART 113 - Digital Photography

3.00 Cr
A basic foundation course covering the entire digital photography workflow including: purchase of a digital camera, taking better photos by making use of design principles, electronically editing images, making digital prints, and strategies for storing and organizing images. Students are required to have their own digital camera.

ART 120 - Art History Ancient-13th Cent

3.00 Cr
Art History: Ancient through 13th Century The study of art history invites students to discover the diversity in and connections among global forms of artistic expression from history. This semester focuses on global art beginning with the Paleolithic period and extending through the Thirteenth Century. Students gather and exchange knowledge through viewing representative images of art, lectures, reading, discussion, and writing. Students analyze works of visual art in a wide variety of media, developing the vocabulary and conceptual framework that empowers them to explain, interpret, and evaluate art in its context. Students engage with the global art world as active participants as they explore form, content, and styles of art, artists, art making processes, and responses to and interpretations of art. Thus students gain deeper understanding of the universal human quest for meaning as expressed in traditional and changing forms of art through the ages.

ART 121 - Art History 14th Cent-Contemp

3.00 Cr
Art History: 14th Century through Contemporary. The study of art history invites students to discover the diversity in and connections among global forms of artistic expression from history. This semester focuses on global art beginning with the Fourteenth-Century and the Early Renaissance in Europe, and extending up to the present day. Students gather and exchange knowledge through viewing representative images of art, lectures, reading, discussion, and writing. Students analyze works of visual art in a wide variety of media, developing the vocabulary and conceptual framework that empowers them to explain, interpret, and evaluate art in its context. Students engage with the global art world as active participants as they explore form, content, and styles of art, artists, art making processes, and responses to and interpretations of art. Thus students gain deeper understanding of the universal human quest for meaning as expressed in traditional and changing forms of art through the ages.

ART 201 - Acrylic Painting

3.00 Cr
This class is an introduction to methods of painting with acrylics. Emphasis will be on composition, color theory, and technique. Demonstrations in various techniques with a variety of subject matter and styles are included. Students are required to spend at least six hours per week outside of class on assignments. Experience in drawing and/or design is highly recommended.

ART 206 - Watercolor Painting

3.00 Cr
This class is an introduction to methods of painting with transparent watercolors. Emphasis will be on composition, color theory, and concept. Demonstrations in a variety of techniques with a variety of subject matter and styles are included. Students are required to spend at least six hours per week outside of class on assignments.

ART 248 - History of Film

3.00 Cr
An overview of the history of film from its beginnings in the late 19th century through its exciting growth into the most popular performing art of this century, including a study of film?s social impact, stars, directors, business management history, and recent video revolution. The course will also offer weekly viewing selections of many of the great films of cinematic literature.

ART 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ART 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ART 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

AS 102 - Astronomy

3.00 Cr
An introduction to astronomy for the non-science major. This course satisfies the Core requirement for a lab course in natural sciences. The course begins with an historical development of astronomy and a qualitative account of relevant principles of science. Topics include the tools of astronomy, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy, cosmology, and life in the universe. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.

BA 100 - Introduction to Business

3.00 Cr
This course is designed for the student with little or no experience in business and its related fields. This course helps the student to build the necessary understanding of the myriad of business terms that exist today. Topics covered include management, marketing, capitalism, computers, accounting, finance, ethics, and international business.

BA 178 - Entrepreneurship Lectures

1.00 Cr
Seminar class sessions that will run consecutively with the 3 credit Practicum course. Each year the Lecture series date will change to reflect the year. This will give students the opportunity to receive credit for taking the course more than once (each year will be a different lineup of speakers). Will include speakers, outside activities and individual meeting with entrepreneur mentors. Students will be required to attend all presentations and have the option to work with students from the 378 course in the development of their business ideas. It will also be required that BA 178 students are actively involved in Enactus for this semester, giving them the opportunity to apply the skills they are learning in class.

BA 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BA 203 - Principles of Financial Acct

3.00 Cr
Principles of Financial Accounting explores the principles of recording, analyzing, and communicating information about the economic activities of organizations. Preparation of financial statements (i.e., income statement, retained earnings and stockholders' equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows) and interpretation of data for decision-making is explored.

BA 204 - Principles of Managerial Acct

3.00 Cr
This course introduces the principles of managerial accounting and the development of data for use in planning, control, and decision making. Managerial accounting topics include product costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, variance analysis, capital budgeting, and decision analysis tools.

BA 227 - Nonprofit Fundraising

3.00 Cr
This is a valuable course for anyone expecting to work in a nonprofit organization or serve on a charitable organization's board of directors. The course presents the role and scope of philanthropy in the United States beginning with our western cultural heritage through today's sophisticated marketing-driven technology-based appeals. The structure of fundraising programs is presented as the organizing feature of successful fundraising activities across a range of techniques and approaches from annual fund campaigns to capital campaigns to planned giving programs.

BA 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BA 301 - Business Law

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the study of law designed to acquaint the student with the legal controls under which modern business is conducted. The course topics include law of contracts and agency, bailment, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and corporations.

BA 303 - Inter Financial Accounting I

3.00 Cr
Course emphasis is on accounting theory and concepts, as well as analysis of the problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts Course Descriptions to financial accounting. Attention is focused on the use of accounting information as a basis for decision making by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial statements and accounting reports.

BA 304 - Inter Financial Accounting II

3.00 Cr
Course emphasis is on accounting theory and concepts, as well as analysis of the problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts to financial accounting. Attention is focused on the use of accounting information as a basis for decision making by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial statements and accounting reports.

BA 306 - Marketing

3.00 Cr
An introduction to marketing and management decision making in the pricing, promotion, and distribution of products. Consideration of the behavioral, legal, ethical, competitive, and economic environments as they affect decisions in domestic and international business organizations.

BA 307 - Accouting Finance Entrepreneur

1.00 Cr
Accounting and Finance for the Entrepreneur/Small Business Owner. This course examines accounting and finance for the entrepreneur or small business owner. Topics include the basics of cash flow management, financial management, record keeping, banking services, credit reporting, risk management, insurance, income tax, and selling or planning for succession.

BA 308 - Human Resource Management

3.00 Cr
This course covers contemporary issues in human resource management. Topics include development of human resources, strategic human resource planning, job analysis, compensation issues, policies and procedures, laws and regulations, performance evaluation, personnel conflict resolution, and achievement of organizational goals.

BA 309 - Operations Research

3.00 Cr
This course provides an introduction to quantitative modeling methods used in business and economics. The course focuses on computer implementation of the models, the application of these models to practical decision-making scenarios, and sensitivity analysis of the model assumptions. Operations research tools including optimization, queuing, simulation, forecasting, and decision analysis are covered.

BA 313 - Managerial Finance

3.00 Cr
Managerial Finance is the first of a series of finance courses of the financial planning major and a general requirement for all majors within the business department at Carroll College. The course will teach principles of fundamental concepts of corporate finance, fixed income securities, stocks, projects and their valuation, corporate valuation, the cost of capital, and capital budgeting decisions.

BA 315 - Cost Accounting

3.00 Cr
This course considers how management teams use accounting information in decision making to fulfill the organization's goals in a sustainable manner. Topics covered consider the measurement, analysis, and reporting of financial and non-financial information useful for decision making and development of organizational strategies. Cost accounting for resources used in the organization, product costing, budgeting, and capital asset decisions are discussed.

BA 318 - Fndns of Financial Planning

3.00 Cr
Foundations of Financial Planning is a course designed to give students a first-hand look at the various components that make up an individual's personal financial situation.

BA 320 - Market Research

3.00 Cr
This course deals with the gathering of information and knowledge to help managers and marketers make better decisions. This course will introduce the student to the research process and various methods for collecting and analyzing data to solve marketing problems.

BA 322 - Consumer Behavior

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on the understanding of consumer behavior, how and why buyers make purchase decisions, how they think, feel, and act before, during and after the purchase. Discussion will deal with the influences that affect these behaviors and how the firm can make decisions about the 4Ps that will ultimately lead to the consumer's purchase.

BA 324 - Marketing Communication & Prom

3.00 Cr
This course is developed around how to think about, critically evaluate and ultimately manage various forms of marketing communications based not only on their individual roles in the process of communication but also on their overall alignment with the company's integrated marketing communication program.

BA 326 - New Product Development

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on the sequence of events that take place starting with the original idea for a new product/service to actual commercialization. It emphasizes the understanding of the various "stages" of development that any new product must pass, and the various activities each functional area of the firm must contribute, in order to have a successful product launch.

BA 328 - Personal Selling

3.00 Cr
This course is a study of the skills needed to develop and manage long-term relationships with customers and suppliers. Emphasis is placed on relationship selling, presentation, prospecting, handling objections and closing techniques with consideration given to differences in the global marketplace. Personal Selling covers professional selling practices and philosophies, provides a basic introduction to the activities of sales management, training and recruitment, performance evaluation, compensation, budgeting as well as time and territory management.

BA 338 - Intro Nonprofit Organizations

3.00 Cr
This course examines the role of the nonprofit sector in the United States and its relationship to governments and the business sector. Topics include the unique characteristics of nonprofit organizations such as donated revenue, volunteer boards of directors, multiple revenue sources, and a combination of volunteer and paid staffing. The course investigates governance and management responsibilities and functions. The course is open to students in all majors. Knowledge gained in the course will be useful for future vocations in nonprofit organizations, philanthropic activities, or service on nonprofit boards.

BA 351 - Banking Management

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to disseminate information to students interested in acquiring more knowledge in the areas of lending and banking operations including the roles, duties and responsibilities of bankers to their customers as well as their industry.

BA 360 - Accounting & Finance Info Syst

3.00 Cr
This course acquaints students with accounting and finance information systems. Topics include business processes, transaction processing, internal controls, data security, systems documentation, information technology, and software applications.

BA 365 - Financial Analysis Using Excel

3.00 Cr
This course assists students to become proficient in making financial decisions and analyzing financial statements using software solutions. Students will create templates for a variety of financial problems and investment decisions. Students will also explore capabilities for a wide range of data presentation solutions.

BA 375 - Fundamentals of Management

3.00 Cr
An introduction to effective management practices, including planning, staffing, organizing, leading, and controlling organizational functions.

BA 377 - Entrepreneurship (WI)

3.00 Cr
Entrepreneurship will provide students with the opportunity to engage in an experiential learning exercise in which the student will develop a substantial business plan in order to implement the knowledge gained within the class to a meaningful application of the class material.

BA 378 - Entrepreneurship Practicum

3.00 Cr
Application and experiential learning opportunities, based upon business plan ideas that were developed in BA 377. Experiential learning that will enhance entrepreneurial leadership skills, strategic business planning, exploration of funding options and professional communication. Students will work with faculty members, SBA, MBAC, SCORE and an Entrepreneur in Residence to help master these skills. Practicum students will be required to enroll in the Cengage Small Business Management online curriculum, giving them access to resources and a framework for developing and implementing their business venture. There will be a limit of 10 students per semester. Only students pursuing the entrepreneurship certificate will be able to enroll.

BA 392 - International Business(GD&WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is intended as the student's introductory course in international business. Topics included will be how managers deal with the international monetary system, as well as the various environments, organizations, and uncontrollable factors that make up the foreign environments. It will also deal with these factors' impact on the business and the functions of management.

BA 402 - Proj Mgt & Process Improvement

3.00 Cr
All firms have processes, most of which can be improved or optimized. The ability of managers to identify costly variation in their processes and to reduce that variation using project management tools and methods is a key skill set and, combined with leadership, can enhance the success of a firm. This course is designed to help students understand the theoretical and practical demands of project management and process improvement within an organization. Students will learn how to gain support and drive change using a well-defined tool-based methodology. Using simulations, case studies and real projects sponsored by internal and external clients, students will use the Six Sigma D-M-A-I-C (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) methods and tools and classic project management methods to drive measurable changes in processes. Students will learn a valuable skill set and be awarded industry recognized Six Sigma Belt Certification upon successful course completion.

BA 405 - Auditing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to the principles of auditing with a focus on financial statement audits for both public and non-public entities. The course presents conceptual consideration of the environment and philosophy of auditing and practical aspects of auditing techniques and procedures. Topics include professional standards and ethics, audit evidence, internal controls, audit procedures, and audit opinions.

BA 410 - Strategic Management

3.00 Cr
Capstone course for business majors. Students apply the lessons learned from courses in accounting, business, and economics to contemporary problems in business. Analysis includes tools and techniques learned in the business curricula. Investigation of issues is accomplished in a case approach context. Contemporary business readings are used. Final assessment test for majors in Business Administration will be given in this class.

BA 411 - Investment Planning

1.00 Cr
Investment Planning. A study of the basic concepts of investing. Topics covered include the stock and bond markets, commodities, options, money market funds, and mutual funds. An analysis of investment strategies and portfolio management as they apply to both the small and large investor.

BA 412 - Insurance Planning

2.00 Cr
Insurance Planning is a course designed to give students a comprehensive knowledge base of insurance products and their role in a person's overall financial well-being.

BA 413 - Organizational Behavior

3.00 Cr
Allows student to gain insight and knowledge concerning the behavior of individuals and groups in organizational settings in order to predict likely future behavior and aid in the accomplishment of organizational goals.

BA 414 - Retirement Plan & Emp Benefits

3.00 Cr
Retirement Planning and Employee Benefits is a course designed to give students a working knowledge of the details and nuances of the vast array of retirement planning vehicles and strategies.

BA 415 - Federal Taxation

3.00 Cr
An application of federal income tax law for individuals and small businesses. Covers common aspects of typical 1040 tax returns including income, deductions and losses, and property transactions.

BA 420 - Governmental & NFP Accounting

3.00 Cr
This course covers terminology and transactions encountered in governmental and not for profit organizations. Preparation of financial statements according to GASB or FASB standards and decision-making from those statements are included in the course.

BA 421 - Estate Planning

3.00 Cr
This course explores complex tax issues with particular focus on federal income tax law related to trusts, estates, and gifts. Also, this course focuses on estate and gift planning as it relates to satisfying the requirements of the CFP exam.

BA 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship programs recognize that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies ensures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student's overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 12 semester hours for overall internship credits, with a maximum of 6 semester hours for any individual internship experience. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

BA 451 - Adv Financial Analysis/Plan

3.00 Cr
CAPSTONE COURSE FOR FINANCIAL PLANNING MAJOR. Advanced Financial Analysis and Financial Planning is the capstone course in the Financial Planning major and fulfills the writing intensive requirement for the major. All 72 CFP Board learning topic areas will be addressed during this course.

BA 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
The Independent Study form is available in the Registrar's Office or MyCaroll Document Center. Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

BA 489 - Special Topics

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BA 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

BA 501 - Accting Ethics/Legal Issues

3.00 Cr
This course examines the professional and legal responsibilities of accountants with emphasis placed on the professional standards for certified public accountants. Legal implications of business transactions and situations that create potential ethical dilemmas are explored. The course hones research and presentation skills. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 503 - Financial Accounting

3.00 Cr
Financial Accounting Theory, Research, & Practice. Financial reporting conceptual frameworks, principles, and rules for various entities are explored in this course. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge as well as the ability to apply the skills in a variety of financial reporting situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 506 - Advanced Auditing

3.00 Cr
This course is an in-depth examination of the auditing and attestation standards for both issuers (public companies) and non-issuers (nonpublic companies). Topics include contemporary auditing issues, ethical responsibilities of the auditor, and the ability to research complex situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 507 - Advanced Accounting Topics

3.00 Cr
Complex issues in contemporary financial reporting including business combinations, partnerships, and international transactions are explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 510 - Not-For-Profit Accounting

3.00 Cr
This course examines unique aspects of not-for-profit entities along with the related reporting intricacies. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 511 - Tax Research/Practice

3.00 Cr
In-depth coverage of federal income tax theory and practice related to individual, partnership, and corporate tax issues. The course hones research and presentation skills in addition to application of tax law to a variety of complex tax situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 521 - Advanced Taxation Topics

3.00 Cr
This course explores complex tax issues with particular focus on federal income tax law related to trusts, estates, and gifts. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 526 - Forensic Accounting

3.00 Cr
Fraud motivation, forensic auditing tools and techniques, and legal issues are examined in this course. The course includes data analytics as applied to forensic investigations and financial reporting issues. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 536 - Sustainability Accounting

3.00 Cr
Sustainability Accounting and Integrated Reporting This course explores contemporary issues related to the integration of social responsibility, environmental issues, and long-term profitability in an entity's reporting. GRI sustainability reporting guidelines, the IIRC framework, and the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) standards of the SASB are examined. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 575 - Managerial Accounting/Issues

3.00 Cr
Managerial Accounting and Contemporary Business Issues. Contemporary issues such as governance, globalization, economic concerns, information systems, financial and operational management, managerial accounting, and strategic planning are among the topics covered in this course. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BI 101 - Life Science

4.00 Cr
An introduction to the fundamental principles common to all living organisms. Presents basic biological principles at the organismal level including structure and function, evolution, and ecology. A course for non-biology majors. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 102 - Human Biology

4.00 Cr
An introduction to the fundamental principles common to all living organisms. Presents basic biological principles using human systems as a study model including cell biology, genetics, and physiology. A course for non-biology majors. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 171 - Biological Principles I

3.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing upon fundamental biological concepts and methods for students planning to major in biology or for students needing to satisfy a professional school requirement in biology. This course, the first in a two semester series, focuses on biomolecules, the molecular components of life, fundamental cell structures and an introduction to genetics. This course provides a foundation for more advanced courses in the biology major's program and is a prerequisite for all other courses in the program. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 172 - Biological Principles II

3.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing upon fundamental biological concepts and methods for students planning to major in biology or for students needing to satisfy a professional school requirement in biology. This course, the second in a two semester series, focuses on the biological principles of evolution and speciation, a survey of biological diversity, the study of plant form and function and the study of animal form and function. This course provides a foundation for more advanced courses in the biology major's program and is a prerequisite for all other courses in the program. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 189G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BI 201 - Intro to Human A & P I

4.00 Cr
A study of the morphology and physiology of the human body, both from a normal and pathological viewpoint. Three lectures and one two and one-half hour laboratory per week for 2 semesters.

BI 202 - Intro to Human A & P II

4.00 Cr
A study of the morphology and physiology of the human body, both from a normal and pathological viewpoint. Three lectures and one two and one-half hour laboratory per week for 2 semesters.

BI 214 - General Microbiology

4.00 Cr
An introductory study of microorganisms for allied health professionals (this course does not satisfy requirements of the biology major). Course includes history, taxonomy and nomenclature, morphology, physiology, nutrition, cultivation, ecology, genetics, immunity, and the roles of micro-organisms in disease and agriculture. Emphasis is on bacteria. Standard microbial methods and techniques are learned in the laboratory. Three 50-minute lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 232 - Comparative Anatomy

4.00 Cr
A comparative study of the evolution of the anatomical structures of vertebrates. The course will emphasize the basic structures of vertebrates, the functional role of anatomical structures, and the adaptive changes that have occurred in vertebrate evolution. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 281 - Genetics

4.00 Cr
A study of the principles of inheritance at the organismal and molecular levels. Topics include transmission mechanisms, linkage, DNA replication and gene expression. The laboratory will include an introduction to current molecular genetics techniques. Both lecture and lab will emphasize problem solving and experimental data analysis. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week.

BI 305 - Microbiology

4.00 Cr
An introduction to the biology of the prokaryotes (bacteria and archaea) and the animal viruses. Course topics include bacterial cell structure, nutrition and metabolism, growth, genetics, traditional and molecular systematics, ecology of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, antimicrobial agents, host parasite interactions, and major infectious diseases. Current methods in bacteriology are used in the identification of bacteria and the conducting of experiments.

BI 306 - Plant Biology

4.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing on the evolutionary history of plants, plant anatomy, and physiology. The laboratory exercises are diverse and emphasize recognizing reproductive and anatomical differences among major plant taxa (from algae to flowering plants), learning how to identify seed plants (gymnosperms and angiosperms) to the family level, and physiological experiments. Three 50-minute lectures per week and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 307 - Animal Physiology

4.00 Cr
A study of the vertebrate organ systems which are most intimately involved in maintaining homeostasis: Nervous, Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory and Excretory. Regulation and integration of the systems will be emphasized. Individual study of assigned journal articles which complement the lecture material constitutes a major part of the learning experience. The laboratory offers the student experience using a variety of preparations and instrumentation. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week.

BI 311 - Ecology (WI)

4.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing on the basic principles of the interactions and relationships among organisms and between organisms and their environment. The laboratory includes field observations, computer simulations, and statistical analysis of experimental data. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 312 - Global Change Ecology

4.00 Cr
This course will provide a scientific foundation for understanding the causes and effects of major types of human-caused global change. Topics will include anthropogenic climate change, land-use change, nutrient cycling, invasive species, and others. The course will introduce students to global-scale ecological questions and research methods through a focus on current primary research. Students will also be introduced to the links between global change sciences and other disciplines through the discussion of possible solutions to these human-caused problems.

BI 323 - Comparative Anatomy

4.00 Cr
A comparative study of the evolution of the anatomical structures of vertebrates. The course will emphasize the basic structures of vertebrates, the functional role of anatomical structures, and the adaptive changes that have occurred in vertebrate evolution. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 330 - Molecular Biology(WI)

4.00 Cr
This course covers the molecular basis of biological activity through in-depth study of DNA. RNA and protein biosynthesis, regulation, and functional interactions. Particular emphasis is placed on the processes of DNA replication and repair, RNA transcription and processing, protein synthesis and post-translational modifications, and the regulation of gene expression. Students will also be introduced to various cell and molecular laboratory techniques, including PCR, gel electrophoresis, cloning, and bacterial transformation, through hands-on experiments and independent study. Three 50-minute lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week.

BI 350 - Developmental Biology

4.00 Cr
A course concerned with the mechanisms of early development in animals. The molecular and cellular processes affecting differentiation, growth, and morphogenesis are emphasized. The laboratory includes experimental work and the study of anatomical changes occurring in vertebrate embryos. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

BI 369 - Cell and Molecular Neuroscienc

4.00 Cr
This course explores the basic biology of the nervous system. Topics covered include molecular signaling between nerve cells, early brain development, the construction of neural circuits, nervous system repair and regeneration, and complex brain functions. The laboratory portion of this course will be research-based with students applying techniques used in the fields of molecular and cellular Neuroscience.

BI 370 - Evolutionary Analysis(WI)

4.00 Cr
This course explores the underlying principles of evolutionary change (natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow) from an analytical perspective. The relevance of evolutionary change to real world concerns is emphasized while traditional and modem methods of analysis are explored and evaluated. Three 50-minute lectures and one 3-hour lab per week.

BI 382 - Cell Biology

4.00 Cr
This upper-division course focuses on the cell as the basic unit of structure and function in living things. Topics include cellular organization, the structures and functions of cellular organelles and the cytoskeleton, energy transformations, communication between cells, and the cell cycle. Methods used to study cells and their component parts will be introduced in the laboratory portion of the course. Laboratories will introduce advanced techniques in molecular/cellular biology. Lectures will integrate material from genetics, chemistry and introductory biology. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

BI 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BI 425 - BI Internship:

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

BI 477 - Thesis Research/Writing (WI)

2.00 Cr
This course is intended to guide students through the process of writing an honors thesis based upon data the student have collected. The course consists of weekly meetings during which the parts of the thesis (Introduction and Literature Review, Materials and Methods, Results, and Discussion) will be discussed. Poster and Power Point presentations are covered. By the end of the semester, students will have completed a draft of their theses. One hour lecture/discussion per week.

BI 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

BI 496 - Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
Readings and discussion of significant past and current literature.

BI 499 - Senior Thesis

2.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

BMB 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

BMB 496 - BMB Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
This course focuses on critical evaluation of information relevant to biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB). Students will discuss issues relevant to BMB research, ethics, funding and careers. Students will read, evaluate, and discuss past and current literature in biochemistry and molecular biology. Each student will provide oral presentations of work that they have reviewed.

CATH 205 - The Magisterium & Culture

3.00 Cr
An examination of the Magisterium as a teaching institution from within the Catholic perspective of discipleship to Christ. The course will examine select teachings of Magisterium, especially cooperative grace, as related to important secondary teachings within the Church, including social teachings.

CATH 206 - Catholic Anthropology

3.00 Cr
An exploration of the goodness of human nature as presented by the Catholic Magisterium and Theology. This study considers human beings as creatures called to a final end, and considers philosophical and sociological treatments that complement, and also contend against, this view. Topics will explore the concept of "ontological receptivity" which grounds the human person and defines the person's creative capacities.

CATH 207 - Grace & the Human Experience

3.00 Cr
An exploration of how grace (the divine life) is communicated to and received by human persons, including study of the sacramental life of the church, the Christian moral life (particularly natural law), and Catholic social teachings. The course focuses on creative responses to grace, both individual and communal, such as the Rule of St, Benedict, the rise of the mendicant orders, Ignatian spirituality, the great spiritual classics of the late renaissance, and the contemporary lay movements.

CATH 305 - Faith & Reason

3.00 Cr
This course continues CATH 205 by examining the role of philosophy and reasoning to the Catholic Church's fulfillment of its own mission to express the truth about God, and follows the historical emergence of the synthesis of faith and reason. The course also considers how the Catholic intellectual life manifests itself in deference towards faith.

CATH 306 - Lives of the Saints

3.00 Cr
Continues the exploration of goodness begun in CATH 206 through the study of lives of the Saints. The lives of the Saints present extraordinary examples of Christian life lived out in goodness and beauty, often in the face of personal and social challenges of their culture and time. The course will consider the saint's (or saints') achievements both in terms of their intellectual and cultural significance, and of their significance to Catholic history and the development of the Catholic understanding of the possibilities of grace and freedom.

CATH 308 - Cath Intellect & Artistic Trad

3.00 Cr
The Catholic Intellectual & Artistic Tradition. The continued exploration of the expression of beauty in human life begun in CATH 207, by a more concentrated study of Catholic contributions tot he intellectual and artistic life. This course will study one or more distinct areas of intellectual endeavor(such as art or music of a specific period, the history of philosophy, theological developments, literature), consider both in terms of its own goals and methodology, and as expressions of the creativity of field and the grace of Christian vocation. Where possible, the course will include study and analysis of the culture and of specific figure's own writing; otherwise, it will rely on bibliographical and other sources to inform course analysis.

CATH 495 - Catholicism Engaged

1.00 Cr
This capstone course applies the broader dialogue begun in previous CSP course into a specific, 21st Century context. The first half of the course will look at a specific example of integration, drawing the students to formulate and configure their faith for their majors, future careers, or vocations, and to integrate the broad spectrum fo Truth, Beauty, and Goodness within their own lives. Then the course will develop research and writing skills, in preparation for the senior paper required in CATH 497.

CATH 497 - Senior Paper

1.00 Cr
The senior paper is an original work a student prepares under the guidance of a professor in the Catholic Studies Department. Drawing upon their understanding of the Catholic faith tradition, and the insights learned ion the previous courses, students complete a 5000-7000 word essay that integrates their faith with their academic major, career,or chosen profession. The thesis must be approved by the director of the Catholic Studies Program.

CATH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

CH 101 - General Chemistry I

3.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 101L - General Chemistry I Lab

1.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 102 - General Chemistry II

3.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 102L - General Chemistry II Lab

1.00 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 103 - Accelerated General Chemistry

4.00 Cr
This course will provide a solid foundation in the basic principles of chemistry that underlie more advanced topics in chemistry, biology and engineering. It is intended for students majoring in the sciences and engineering (but it is open to anyone). One semester accelerated course covering topics that include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, intermolecular force, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. This is similar material to that covered in CH 101-102, except this is an accelerated course. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week.

CH 111 - Essentials of Chemistry I: Gen

3.00 Cr
A one-semester course in the fundamentals of general inorganic chemistry. Principal topics include atomic structure; atomic-molecular description of matter, solutions, and equilibrium; and basic calculations and measurements. Recommended for general studies students and students in nursing and health information management. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

CH 111L - Essentials of Chemistry Lab

1.00 Cr
A one-semester course in the fundamentals of general inorganic chemistry. Principal topics include atomic structure; atomic-molecular description of matter, solutions, and equilibrium; and basic calculations and measurements. Recommended for general studies students and students in nursing and health information management. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

CH 112 - Ess of Chem II:Organic/Biochm

3.00 Cr
The first portion of the course explores the structures, functions, and properties of biologically relevant organic macromolecules including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and enzymes. From there, the course explores the genetic control of biochemical processes, control of cell division and cell death, the biochemistry of cancer, and how pharmaceuticals are developed to treat disease. Finally, the course explores bioenergetics and metabolic processes that provide the energy for life. A major consideration is how these processes interface with health and disease. Recommended for students in nursing. Three lectures per week; no laboratory.

CH 205 - Quantitative Analysis

4.00 Cr
A detailed study of analytical chemistry focusing on classical methods of chemical analysis in systems at equilibrium. Topics covered include measurement and concentration, experimental error and uncertainty in chemical analysis, statistical analysis of laboratory data, solubility equilibria, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction chemistry, complexometric reactions, phase equilibrium, activity, electrochemistry, potentiometry, and the interaction of light with matter. These areas are studied in the context of analytical laboratory techniques, including volumetric analysis, titrimetry, gravimetry, chromatography and spectrophotometry. Basic issues of chemical hygiene are also covered. The laboratory stresses good laboratory technique through the quantitative analysis of unknown samples by classical and modern methods. Three 50-minute lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week.

CH 301 - Organic Chemistry I

3.00 Cr
A two semester sequence on the chemistry of carbon-based compounds. The sequence will examine the main classes of organic compounds in terms of preparation, structure, physical and spectral properties, methods of functional group transformation, and mechanism of reaction. In the second semester of the laboratory sequence, students will perform an independent organic laboratory project. There will be an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication of the projects results. Three lectures and one 3 1/2- hour laboratory per week.

CH 301L - Organic Chemistry I Lab

1.00 Cr
A two semester sequence on the chemistry of carbon-based compounds. The sequence will examine the main classes of organic compounds in terms of preparation, structure, physical and spectral properties, methods of functional group transformation, and mechanism of reaction. In the second semester of the laboratory sequence, students will perform an independent organic laboratory project. There will be an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication of the projects results.

Three lectures and one 3 1/2- hour laboratory per week.

CH 302 - Organic Chemistry II

3.00 Cr
A two semester sequence on the chemistry of carbon-based compounds. The sequence will examine the main classes of organic compounds in terms of preparation, structure, physical and spectral properties, methods of functional group transformation, and mechanism of reaction. In the second semester of the laboratory sequence, students will perform an independent organic laboratory project. There will be an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication of the projects results. Three lectures and one 3 1/2- hour laboratory per week.

CH 302L - Organic Chemistry II Lab

1.00 Cr
A two semester sequence on the chemistry of carbon-based compounds. The sequence will examine the main classes of organic compounds in terms of preparation, structure, physical and spectral properties, methods of functional group transformation, and mechanism of reaction. In the second semester of the laboratory sequence, students will perform an independent organic laboratory project. There will be an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication of the projects results. Three lectures and one 3 1/2- hour laboratory per week.

CH 306 - Instrumental Methods

3.00 Cr
An examination of modern instrumental methods of chemical analysis from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Students learn the chemical principles that underlie instrument operation and study the functions of instrument components and their organization into chemical measurement systems. An emphasis is placed on the utility and limitations of each instrument. Principal instrumental techniques include atomic and molecular optical spectroscopy, gas and liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The laboratory provides students with hands-on access to a wide variety of state-of-the-art chemical instrumentation.

CH 311 - Spectrometric Org Structure Dt

2.00 Cr
CH 311 is a seminar-style course where students will learn to read and interpret data produced by chemistry instruments. This course is intended for chemistry majors who are planning to attend graduate school, but others who are interested in how spectrometry is used to determine structure may find this course interesting. The class will meet twice weekly at the designated time.

CH 312 - Intermediate Organic Chemistry

4.00 Cr
A one-semester course in organic chemistry that focuses on organic chemistry concepts needed for understanding biochemistry. Content also includes nomenclature, configurational and conformational analysis, and valence bond theory, as well as some important mechanisms. Three lectures/week plus one 3.5 hour lab.

CH 353 - Biochemistry I

4.00 Cr
A study of the chemical principles governing biological macromolecules. Topics include protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, carbohydrates and lipids, energetics and major metabolic pathways. The laboratory will include both computer simulations and an introduction to current molecular techniques in the field. Both lecture and lab will emphasize problem solving and experimental data analysis. Three lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week.

CH 354 - Biochemistry II

4.00 Cr
This course emphasizes biochemical processes that occur in living organisms. It expands upon the material covered in CHEM 353 to include additional consideration of metabolism and how it is studied, as well as advanced topics in metabolic diseases, protein biochemistry, and enzymology. Additional topics include drug development, and the biochemistry of sensory systems, memory, and immunity. The course utilizes several tools including textbook readings, lecture, clinical case studies, evaluation of original research papers, and project-based laboratory exercises.

CH 390 - Physical Chem for Life Science

4.00 Cr
Physical chemistry for life sciences focuses on quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics as they pertain to chemical and biochemical systems. Emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of energy quantization in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. The lab includes investigations of energetics, molecular structure and reaction dynamics requiring the use of advanced instrumentation. One semester course: Three 50 minute lectures and one 3 hour lab per week.

CH 391 - Physical Chemistry

3.00 Cr
The first semester of this course (CH 391) topics include the origin, applications, and implications of quantum mechanics. Specific topics include spectroscopy (rotational, vibrational, electronic and NMR), chemical bonding, and molecular structure. The second semester (CH 392) topics include thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Through the two semesters emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics and the quantization of energy levels in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. Two semester course: Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 392 - Physical Chemistry

3.00 Cr
The first semester of this course (CH 391) topics include the origin, applications, and implications of quantum mechanics. Specific topics include spectroscopy (rotational, vibrational, electronic and NMR), chemical bonding, and molecular structure. The second semester (CH 392) topics include thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Through the two semesters emphasis will be placed in applying a conceptual understanding of quantum mechanics and the quantization of energy levels in molecular and atomic systems when answering quantitative chemical problems. Two semester course: Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 405 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

3.00 Cr
A detailed study of current topics in inorganic chemistry, including coordination chemistry, organometallic chemistry, homogeneous catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on orbital interactions, reactivity and reaction mechanisms of inorganic molecules. Lab covers synthesis and spectroscopy of inorganic compounds. Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 406 - Advanced Organic Chemistry

3.00 Cr
This course will provide an in-depth study of the structure, synthesis, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds. The synthesis section will encompass theory, design, and methods used in modern organic synthesis. The structure and mechanistic section will cover conformational analysis, stereochemistry, molecular orbital theory as it applies to conjugated pi systems, reaction mechanisms and methods of mechanism elucidation. Original papers in current science literature will be analyzed with an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication. Three 50-minute lectures per week.

CH 411 - Integrated Lab I Lab

2.00 Cr
A two-course series to be taken in consecutive semesters primarily in the fourth year of study. This lab-only course integrates content from physical chemistry, instrumental methods, advanced organic, and advanced inorganic chemistry by providing research or research-like experiences. Learning outcomes are to: 1) develop advanced synthetic abilities, 2) apply modern instrumentation for data generation, 3) analyze data in light of modern theory, 4) report findings in written and oral formats, and 5) search and employ primary literature sources. Lab meets two times per week for 3.5 hours each.

CH 412 - Integrated Lab II (WI) Lab

2.00 Cr
A two-course series to be taken in consecutive semesters primarily in the fourth year of study. This lab-only course integrates content from physical chemistry, instrumental methods, advanced organic, and advanced inorganic chemistry by providing research or research-like experiences. Learning outcomes are to: 1) develop advanced synthetic abilities, 2) apply modern instrumentation for data generation, 3) analyze data in light of modern theory, 4) report findings in written and oral formats, and 5) search and employ primary literature sources. Lab meets two times per week for 3.5 hours each.

CH 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

CH 496 - Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
Senior seminar is intended for senior chemistry majors in their last semester of study. The focus of the course will be on developing the skills necessary for the effective communication required in a graduate program or a job in chemistry. Students will be required to give professional, polished oral presentations and will practice the skills of scientific writing, with particular emphasis on the style required for publication in a chemical journal.

CH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

CLST 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

CO 101 - Basic Communication

3.00 Cr
Introduction to the field of communication through the study of life-enhancing communication skills including listening attentively, managing conflict, interviewing successfully, interpreting media, sustaining healthy relationships, working effectively in groups and communicating amid diversity. Students also receive training in multiple forms of public speaking. Assignments apply communication training to students' personal, academic and professional lives.

CO 108 - Digital Publishing

3.00 Cr
An introduction to digital publishing in the age of social media. Students learn basic design philosophy in addition to how to use traditional desktop publishing softwae such as Adobe InDesign for production of pamplets, newsletters, etc. Plus advanced units on digital design, Photoshop, designing for the Web and guides for effective PowerPoint presentations using digital tools.

CO 111 - Introduction to Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and British Parliamentary (BP)/World Debate. Events include extemporaneous, impromptu, after-dinner speaking, persuasion, informative, prose, communication analysis, poetry, duo, dramatic, program oral interpretation and BP/World Debate.

CO 112 - Introduction to Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and British Parliamentary (BP)/World Debate. Events include extemporaneous, impromptu, after-dinner speaking, persuasion, informative, prose, communication analysis, poetry, duo, dramatic, program oral interpretation and BP/World Debate.

CO 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr
Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video." In this course students can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce short movies that could end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies video competition. The course will then expand into elements of film production, all taught by a professor who has produced documentaries and trained professional broadcasters.

CO 165 - Fund TV/Film Production:Writg

3.00 Cr
Introduces students to the writing techniques and design of TV, Film and video programs in both multi-camera and single-camera environments. Students learn about writing styles and techniques, story structure, narration, and dialogue through the writing of broadcast news, persuasive (advertisements), documentary and drama scripts for the audio-visual medium. Students will also have the opportunity to translate their scripts into visual pieces through a hands-on camera exercise.

CO 166 - Film/TV Prod II: Aesthetics

3.00 Cr
Students learn about the creative process of producing film and television programs: camerawork, lighting, art direction, set design, costume design, sound design, editing, and how they all contribute to the film and TV production process. Through a hands-on approach (camerawork) and critical analysis, students will learn and understand how messages are successfully and unsuccessfully crafted, targeted, and delivered through the TV and film medium.

CO 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CO 206 - Small Group Communication

3.00 Cr
The study of group communication processes. Students will learn group communication theory and then apply that theory through in-class group games and out-of-class group projects. The course studies teaches leadership and conflict management skills necessary for leading teams of all types in organizations.

CO 211 - Advanced Forensics 2nd Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 212 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 215 - Intro to Public Relations I

3.00 Cr
A two-semester introduction to the theory and practice of public relations. The first semester focuses on theory and on PR writing (including press releases). The second semester focuses on case studies and the design of a public relations campaign for a local organization.

CO 216 - Intro to Public Relations II

3.00 Cr
A two-semester introduction to the theory and practice of public relations. The first semester focuses on theory and on PR writing (including press releases). The second semester focuses on case studies and the design of a public relations campaign for a local organization.

CO 225 - Professional Communication

3.00 Cr
An advanced course in public speaking with practical career-training emphasis, this course is aimed at preparing students to make polished public presentations. The course will include units on listening, mindfulness, contemplative computing, job interviewing, and public speaking for professionals.

CO 226 - Community Assistant Seminar

2.00 Cr
A course designed for paraprofessionals working in residence halls. By means of readings, professional speakers, and discussions, students will become more effective in performing duties and accepting responsibilities of a resident assistant. Class begins one week before fall semester;

CO 236 - Prospector Student Newspaper I

1.00 Cr
All students are welcome to join the staff of The Prospector, the student newspaper. Students will be assigned tasks in accordance with their talents and the papers' needs: writing stories, taking photos, designing pages or selling ads.

CO 237 - Prospector Student Newspaper 2

1.00 Cr
All students are welcome to join the staff of The Prospector, the student newspaper. Students will be assigned tasks in accordance with their talents and the papers' needs: writing stories, taking photos, designing pages or selling ads.

CO 250 - Social Media and Communication

3.00 Cr
Social Media & Communication examines the profound shift that the Internet, social networking, digital publishing and mobile media technologies (Facebook, Twitter, et al) have on the communication and business landscape. Through both theoretical and practical study, students will examine evolving technologies and their application to personal life, business development and business marketing/sales. The course will end with experiential learning labs utilizing social media, social networking and real-time publishing.

CO 260 - Servant Leadership

3.00 Cr
Servant Leadership, based on Robert Greenleaf's theory, is a leadership course designed to train students to lead humbly, putting service first. Students will learn about the theories of servant leadership, customer service and forgiveness to gain a full understanding of humility-based leadership.

CO 265 - Basic Single Camera Production

4.00 Cr
This course focuses on camera production. The course incorporates actual skill of video shooting and Final Cut editing suite use. Students will assume the role of writer/producer/director and organize a production team, schedule, a shoot and final editing of production into a complete show ready for TV broadcast. Lab required.

CO 275 - Conflict Management

3.00 Cr
Students learn various strategies for engaging in productive conflict management, while preventing and de-escalating destructive conflict. The course examines the dynamics of everyday conflicts across a variety of settings, from personal relationships to the workplace. Additionally, students will be asked to reflect on their own style of conflict management and improve their skills. Course content will include both theory and application, with an emphasis on their interrelation. Topics include factors that influence conflict choices, ethical implications, options for third-party intervention, and the roles of forgiveness and reconciliation.

CO 279 - Writing About Movies (WI)

3.00 Cr
Course is designed to teach a student to recognize and appreciate a good film. Students will watch films, read film reviews, and learn how to write and publish film reviews.

CO 280 - Gender Communication (ND)

3.00 Cr
Examination of interactive relationships between gender and communication in contemporary American society. Course will explore ways that communication creates and perpetuates gender roles and how socially created gender roles are enacted in public and private settings. Students will connect research to everyday lives.

CO 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CO 306 - Writing for the Media (WI)

3.00 Cr
Students learn basic elements of journalistic writing for the print media, including news reporting, feature writing, and column writing. Course includes study of libel law, observation of community media, and production of one issue of the school newspaper. Students will learn AP Style, the gold standard for journalistic writing.

CO 308 - Communication Ethics

3.00 Cr
Course seeks to deepen insights into ethical issues arising on all frontiers of communication, ranging from small groups to news media. Students will read case studies of ethical crises and learn to apply philosophical and religious ethical principles to those crises.

CO 310 - Mass Media

3.00 Cr
The study of the history and theory of contemporary mass media including radio, television, and print media. The course examines the cultural forces that shape and define mass media as well as the way mass media shapes our culture.

CO 311 - Advanced Forensics 3rd Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 312 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 320 - Organizational Communication

3.00 Cr
This course presents both historical and current perspectives on the origins and usefulness of organizational theory relating to communication, emphasizing the relationship between organizational life and communication principles. The course provides an opportunity for experiential learning, combined with theory, for under-standing and improving communication skills in a variety of organizational settings. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain how communication functions within organizations and how communication practices can be used to understand and enhance both employee relationships and organizational effectiveness.

CO 325G - Intercultural Comm (GD)

3.00 Cr
Study of the relationship between culture and communication in everyday life. Students will consider the nature and place of cultural practices in social life and will examine the influence of features of culture (world views, values, beliefs) on communication encounters. Students will examine topics related to diversity and social justice, such as ethnocentrism and stereotyping.

Prerequisite: CO 101.

Spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity requirement or Global Diversity requirement, but not both.

CO 325N - Intercultural Comm (ND)

3.00 Cr
Study of the relationship between culture and communication in everyday life. Students will consider the nature and place of cultural practices in social life and will examine the influence of features of culture (world views, values, beliefs) on communication encounters. Students will examine topics related to diversity and social justice, such as ethnocentrism and stereotyping.

Prerequisite: CO 101.

Spring semester.

Fulfills National Diversity requirement or Global Diversity requirement, but not both.

CO 340 - Interpersonal Comm Theory

3.00 Cr
The study of interpersonal communication from both a personal and theoretical standpoint. Topics include interpersonal concepts (listening, empathy, confirmation, humor, social support, self-disclosure, apprehension, defensiveness, etc.), the initiation, maintenance, and termination of platonic, romantic, and family relationships as well as attraction, courtship, affection, conflict, and destructive behavior.

CO 360 - Health Communication

3.00 Cr
A theoretical and practical examination of the central role of communication in the provision of health care. Students will examine communication issues such as empathy, therapeutic listening, trust, self-disclosure, social support, and interactional control/power and their use and impact on our emotional and physical well-being and in varying heath care relationships: individual (e.g., the patient role, the provider role), interpersonal (e.g., provider-client, provider-family), group (e.g., healthcare teams, self-help/support groups), organizational, and societal. Designed to serve all students, especially those seeking careers as healthcare professionals.

CO 365 - Saints TV: TV Production

3.00 Cr
An application of the structure and aesthetics of message design in film and television. The course is an extension and application of theories and skills from CO 165, CO 166, and CO 265. It is designed to broaden student exposure to single and multi-camera production procedures and technology in the classroom and in the field. Students will incorporate script, picture, and sound to create television programs for Saints TV.

CO 389G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CO 395 - Research Methods Seminar

3.00 Cr
A discussion of selected communication issues associated with researching and reporting about human interaction. The student will investigate the scope, central concepts, and practices of communication research with particular focus upon microanalysis, ethnography, surveys, and experiments.

CO 411 - Advanced Forensics 4th Year

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 412 - Advanced Forensics

1.00 Cr
Preparation for intercollegiate forensics competition in individual events and World Debate in British Parliamentary format. The team competes in the Northwest, the Rocky Mountain region, Canada and in select international events abroad. We are a national program concluding each year with a national tournament against top programs from throughout the country including, for example: The Air Force Academy, the University of Miami, Cornell, Stanford, Harvard and Yale.

CO 414 - Human Communication Theory

3.00 Cr
A critical study of classical and contemporary communication theory. Students consider foundations of communication theory through examination of traditions of theorizing including Rhetoric, Semiotics, Cybernetics, Critical Theory, and Phenomenology.

CO 417 - Methods of Teaching Speech Com

1.00 Cr
Theoretical and applied study of teaching communication and coaching speech. Students will read works on the philosophy of education and will complete a teaching and coaching project.

CO 420 - Globalization Gender & Com-GD

3.00 Cr
This course explores the instruments of globalization and its socio-econo-cultural impact on gender. Students will identify the political, social, and cultural fault lines created by the concept of globalization. The course will examine issues such as the impact of wars, media, and international institutions on the loss of nation-state autonomy and borders as well as globalization's effect on gendered inequality. Also, the course will also examine power shifts and a reconfiguration of political power and civil society and a change in gender roles within the context of national cultures and the global economy.

CO 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
An option available to the communication major who is preparing for a career in public relations, TV/radio broadcasting, public information, communication consulting, or as a media specialist. The student will intern in an appropriate business, state office, or federal agency in the Helena community for supervised, practical experience in the area of the intended career. Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

CO 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

CO 495 - Senior Prac:The Graceful Exit

1.00 Cr
A capstone course about life transitions - particularly the graceful exit from college and the humble entrance into a post-college career. Course includes units on selecting and applying to graduate schools, job interviewing, resume writing, web-based job searching and conference call interviews with successful communication and public relations alumni.

CO 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

CS 110 - Introduction to Programming

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to using computer programs as a way of modeling, analyzing and enhancing the world. The Python language is both powerful and commonly used in business, science and many other applications of computing. An integrated laboratory provides experience in programming and algorithmic problem-solving. Topics include computing and object oriented design methodology, Python fundamentals, modifying objects, control constructs, function usage basics and libraries, programmer defined functions, parameter passing, arrays, the class construct and object-oriented design, event-based programming, and implementing abstract data types.

CS 120 - Data Structures & Prog Design

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to program design, fundamental data structures, and analysis of algorithms. The course addresses data structures as tools that you can use to solve problems that arise in modeling a situation and then executing (simulating) the resultant model. As in CS 110, the course makes use of graphics, sound, pictures, and other media. Topics include contiguous and linked lists (stacks, queues, and general lists), search and sort techniques, binary trees, tables, hashing, recursion, and graphs.

CS 130 - Viral Video

3.00 Cr
Smartphones have given rise to "Citizen Video." In this course students can start producing their citizen videos for distribution on You Tube and elsewhere. Students will dive in to produce short movies that could end up on You Tube and in Carroll's spring Charlies video competition. The course will then expand into elements of film production, all taught by a professor who has produced documentaries and trained professional broadcasters.

CS 202 - Web Design and Development

3.00 Cr
An extensive introduction to website design with an in-depth look at HTML, CSS, structural layout, standards-based coding, and validation techniques. The class will also explore open-source technology, photo and graphic design, color theory, social networks, frameworks, JavaScript (and its various libraries), server-side scripting, and content management systems. Students will examine the inner workings of web hosting services and will understand how to interact with clients and contracts in addition to designing fully functioning, standards-based website at the end of the course. (Course fee required).

CS 213 - Management Information Systems

3.00 Cr
The class familiarizes students with basic concepts in the use of computer applications as management information systems for businesses. It emphasizes database design and concepts with spreadsheets for analysis and reporting of information. Managing technological change, ethics and security are also covered. Hands on projects include using MS Office for presentation, spreadsheet and database applications.

CS 230 - Software Engineering (WI)

4.00 Cr
This course addresses the development of software systems. Problem- solving concepts are integrated with a study of the software development life cycle, including project management, requirements analysis, system design, testing implementation, and maintenance issues. Students will create an object-oriented team project. Lectures and laboratory each week.

CS 241 - Networking Fundamentals

3.00 Cr
The class covers the OSI and TCP/IP models of communication and IP addressing. Emphasis is on local area network (LAN) designs and technologies like cabling, Ethernet and switching. Basic routing concepts are also covered. Labs involve building and configuring your own networks to generate and observe traffic and network behaviors.

CS 251 - Introduction to Linux

3.00 Cr
This course will teach students to install Linux (using Ubuntu Desktop or distribution of the student's choice) and then provide basic command line (Bash) scripting competency. Students will install Linux, preferably on their own computer, in a dual boot or virtual machine environment. The ability to run Linux and Windows or Mac OS on the same machine can provide students with new computer tools. Linux/Unix is used in gaming, research and web environments. Basic skills allows students to begin participating in those environments as well as preparing them for further learning in several Computer Science and Computer Information Systems courses. Basic familiarity with computer hardware and software and your own computer (with 20GB disk free) is recommended.

CS 287 - Student Topics in Computer Sci

1.00 Cr
This course is intended for all CS and CIS minors and majors as well as other students with strong interests in technology as a way to explore new topics, implement new technologies, meet other students and develop meaningful relationships. Upper-class students lead the course. Web, coding techniques and social media technologies are likely topics. The course content will be largely student determined. The course is offered Pass/Fail only. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring new technologies. There is no fee or required materials.

CS 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CS 310 - Database Dsesign

4.00 Cr
Using Oracle, this course concentrates on representing, storing and retrieving data from external storage devices. Learn SQL and software development using Oracle's Application Express. Three one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.

CS 311 - Database Project

4.00 Cr
As a continuation of CS 310, students will analyze, design, implement, test, and present a database project (using Oracle Apex). Lectures and laboratory each week.

CS 322 - Security Policy & Ads Security

4.00 Cr
Students will explore general network and server security issues through, in part, the implementation of Active Directory Services (ADS) in a Microsoft Server environment. Emphasis will be on security, backup, user administration, disk management, and network access. In addition to learning those skills students will be expected to maintain their server as a functional server throughout the course and to implement the security associated with protecting their server (and as an extension, organizations) from growing sophisticated physical and cyber attacks.

CS 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

CS 410 - Operating Systems

4.00 Cr
This class covers the design and theory of modern computer operating systems. It explores topics such as process management, CPU scheduling, memory management and protection, device management and diversified operating systems. Lectures and Lab each week.

CS 421 - Cyber Security

4.00 Cr
This course combines knowledge and skills from the computer network classes with the Operating Systems class (CS410) to build, compromise and secure computer network and server systems. Labs include using Cisco, Microsoft, and Linux systems (switches, routers, workstations and servers) as well as implementing network firewalls. The course also covers security concepts, policies, and risk management as well as hacking techniques and defenses.

CS 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
This course is an internship consisting of supervised work experience with a business or nonprofit agency in the computer science field. Ideally the internship should relate the type of work (network, web, programming, etc.) that the student is most interested in. Forms and procedures can be obtained through the Carroll internship coordinator.

CS 430 - Senior Project: Your Project

4.00 Cr
This course will present students with a substantial experience in software engineering. Students will investigate, design, implement, and present a significant software project, working both as individuals and in project teams. Projects will also teach the students about project management concerns.

CS 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

CS 495 - Computer Science Seminar

3.00 Cr
Various topics not covered in other computer science courses are researched and discussed. Students analyze selected readings on ethics and the integration of technology in business and the world in general as well as work on related projects and/or papers. Students participate in defining and presenting their own content in the class.

CS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

DS 201 - Introduction to Data Science

3.00 Cr
This course teaches critical concepts and skills in data collection, manipulation, exploration, and analysis, and explores the ethical and social considerations inherent in the today's "big data" revolution, such as privacy, design, reproducibility, and bias. Using real-world datasets, students will explore, visualize, and pose questions about data. Prerequisites: Intermediate Algebra.

DS 325 - Adv Stats for Data Science-WI

3.00 Cr
In this course we will learn about data analytics through the lens of data wrangling, statistical graphics, modern regression tools, and the ethical issues associated with the entire data pipeline. Our statistical graphics focus will examine both single variable and multivariable plots, using both discrete and continuous variables. We will review simple linear regression before delving into validity of models and transformations, weighted least-squares, multiple linear regression, variable selection, logistic regression, and mixed models. This class will include several writing projects.

DS 401 - Machine & Statistical Learning

3.00 Cr
Machine and Statistical Learning is a collection of mathematical and statistical techniques used to detect, classify, and infer patterns in large and/or complex data sets. Examples of machine and statistical learning algorithms are all around us: speech recognition on your phone, text prediction in internet searches, medical school placement algorithms, and the prediction of what you may want to watch next on your video stream. This course gives an overview of many concepts, techniques, and algorithms in modern machine and statistical learning including both supervised and unsupervised learning. Topics include linear regression, classification, cross validation, dimension reduction, nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, support vector machines, principal component analysis, artificial neural networks, and clustering. The course will give students the ideas and intuition behind modern machine and statistical learning methods as well as a more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The underlying theme in the course is application of the algorithms to real data sets.

DS 405 - Computing for Data Science

3.00 Cr
This course will explore current techniques in computation for data science, including (but not limited to) parallel and distributed coding algorithms and modern programming languages.

DS 430 - Senior Project

3.00 Cr
This course will present students with a substantial experience in data analysis. Students will investigate and analyze data from a variety of sources, working both as individuals and in project teams. This serves as a capstone experience for the DS major.

DS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

EAS 101 - Earth Science

4.00 Cr
A survey of the earth: its interior, surface processes, climate, landscapes, oceans, and the environmental impacts and influences of these processes on mankind. Topics include the structure of the earth, rivers, glaciers, earthquakes, geologic time and plate tectonics. Lecture topics are reinforced by hands-on activities and field trips including rock and mineral identification and the use of maps and images in the laboratory. Each semester

EAS 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EAS 302 - Advanced Earth Science

3.00 Cr
This course covers advanced topics in earth science. This course digs deeper into the environmental impacts of humans on geological processes and the effects of geological processes on humans through lectures, student projects and field excursions.

EAS 320 - Geomorphology

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to the physical and chemical geologic processes that are active on the surface of the earth. We will use a 'pattern and process' approach integrating description, analysis, and interpretation of landforms, surface patters, sediments, stratigraphy, and soils in order to understand geomorphic processes and how they reflect the evolution of landscape.

EC 106 - Survey of Economics

3.00 Cr
Provides an introduction to contemporary economic issues and accompanying public policies. Topics covered include inflation, deficit, unemployment, interest rates and financial institutions, social security, pollution, prices, and profits of businesses. This course is designed for non-majors. Departmental majors may take the course, but also must complete EC 201-202.

EC 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 201 - Principles of Microeconomics

3.00 Cr
Basic economic principles of individual and business decision-making concerning the use of resources and products in the market setting of the U.S. economy. Fundamentals of supply and demand and microeconomics are emphasized in this semester course.

EC 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics

3.00 Cr
This course discusses national economic activity including the role of money and financial institutions in the U.S. economy. Topics include balance of payment problems, international economics, and the role of the government and Federal Reserve system in achieving full employment and price stability.

EC 203 - Project Management Economics

3.00 Cr
This course introduces students to three vital components of project management, each of which contains economic aspects. The three components are financial activities of the project manager, economic analysis, and legal considerations. Examples and case studies will address situations that require decisions having economic implications from project managers in the industrial, commercial, professional, and public sectors. Topics covered include developing project scopes, schedules and budgets, evaluating capital expenditures, considering operational costs, reviewing contracts and specifications, and addressing ethical dilemmas. Three class hours per week.

EC 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 389W - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ED 102 - Foundations of Education (WI)

3.00 Cr
An introductory course for prospective teachers that provides a broad intellectual structure for understanding the nature of the school as a social institution, the teaching profession as a potential career, and themselves as prospective teachers. Students will explore: 1) a variety of social, political, economic, legal, and philosophical variables that have made the American public school what it is today, 2) the connections between historical and contemporary educational issues, and 3) the potential impact of their own temperaments, talents, and motivations, upon their satisfaction and effectiveness as teachers. Students will be introduced to the conceptual framework and the assessment process that guides the teacher education program at Carroll College. A twenty (20) hour field experience in a public school classroom is required.

ED 103 - Instructional Media & Tech

3.00 Cr
This course is intended for students seeking teacher licensure. Students will not only interact with new technologies for enhanced learning and engagement in instructional media, but develop technology based unit plans (TBUP's) for future integration of technology into education. Course focus is on both hardware and software of instructional media. No prior knowledge of computers or other technology is assumed.

ED 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr

Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ED 214 - School Health Program

1.00 Cr
This course includes the study of school personnel's role in the promotion of health and prevention of disease; focus is on the teacher's responsibility in the comprehensive school health program. This course will address adapting content and teaching strategies for different age groups of learners as well as learners with different characteristics.

ED 228 - Children's Literature

3.00 Cr
Students read, listen to, and evaluate a wide variety of fiction and nonfiction literature published for or enjoyed by children. Techniques for teaching literature and using literature in other content areas are discussed and presented.

ED 229 - Educational Psychology

3.00 Cr
A study of the psychological theories and principles that affect teaching and learning in educational environments. The focus of this course is on the theories and methods associated with the process of learning as well as the application of this knowledge in a variety of classroom environments.

ED 245 - Diversity Field Experience

1.00 Cr
Utilizing a 30 hour field experience, this course is designed to expand the range of each student's understanding of the experience of preK-12 students who, because of such fundamental components as race, ethnicity, gender, or other characteristics, may have been historically marginalized by society. It is anticipated that students will expand their understanding of these social groups by identifying possible personal bias and experimenting with appropriate teaching strategies for these students. Students will meet with their advisors to plan the details their field experience prior to registering for the course.

ED 305 - Classroom Management

2.00 Cr
This course focuses on strategies for effective classroom management, with learning activities related to building relationships, organizing the classroom, developing and implementing rules and procedures, teaching effectively, utilizing positive behavior management, and implementing behavioral interventions.

ED 309 - Content Methods for Secondary

3.00 Cr
This course examines the role of the teacher in delivering specific content and curricula in the secondary school classroom. Students will develop lesson plans that integrate knowledge across the disciplines of English, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies. Planning for implementation of cooperative learning, alternative assessment, and verbal techniques that encourage student thinking will be addressed. Development of the emerging professional at the technical level will be emphasized. Students will be required to complete a 45 hour field experience in a 6-12 discipline specific classroom.

ED 312 - Elementary Sci and Soc Studies

4.00 Cr
A course designed to help the preservice teacher develop a defensible rationale for making curricular and instructional decisions concerning the substance of instruction, techniques of instruction, and evaluation practices as unique to the teaching of elementary social studies and science. This course combines lecture and laboratory in which students will study science and social studies curricula, the planning and design of hands-on activities and materials, and teaching both content and process. In addition, students will be exposed to the metric system of measurement. Prerequisites: A lab course in at least two of the following science disciplines: physical, life and earth science. Spring semester.

ED 314 - Phys-Ed Elem School

3.00 Cr
This course provides the knowledge, theory, and some practical applications of physical education within the Elementary school setting. Students will learn about the various components of an elementary physical education program and will learn how to develop a year-long elementary physical education curriculum. Students will learn games and activities appropriate to the developmental level of elementary children, health promotion concepts, teaching methodology, evaluation techniques, and the importance of physical education as an integral part of general education.

ED 318 - Cont Area Reading & Sec Methds

3.00 Cr
This course considers classroom planning, lesson presentation skills, and instructional equipment and materials. Students study the development of listening, speaking, vocabulary, reading, and writing, and learn assessment techniques as well as strategies to improve study skills, writing, and reading, while teaching content areas. Students analyze text and electronic reading materials used in content areas. A 45-hour exploratory experience in a public school classroom is required. Prior field experiences will be analyzed to determine grade level placement for this field experience.

ED 320 - Art Education in the Elem Sch

2.00 Cr
This course provides knowledge and appreciation of art instructional methods necessary to 1) teach the K-8 students the basic elements and principles of artistic design, 2) develop in the K-8 student an appreciation of the role of cultural heritage in the visual environment, 3) understand the stages of creative development in children, and 4) establish an appropriate art curriculum. Spring semester.

ED 321 - Arts Integration Elementary

3.00 Cr
Arts Integration in the Elementary School This course is designed to equip preservice teachers with knowledge, skills, and appreciation for using the arts (visual, media, drama/theater, music, and dance) as an effective methodology for learning in an integrated curriculum. We explore how students learn (1) with the arts, (2) through the arts, and (3) about the arts. Students in this course will experience a variety of arts and arts-integrated lessons, as well as design and deliver their own standards-based arts-integrated lessons.

ED 323 - Teaching Commun Arts I

2.00 Cr
Students focus on the development, curriculum, instruction, and assessment of writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and thinking. Methods, materials, techniques, and strategies for teaching all of the communication arts are presented and discussed.

ED 324 - Diagnostic-Based Interventions

3.00 Cr
Diagnostic-Based Interventions in Literacy Instruction. This course is designed to prepare the classroom teacher to assess children's reading levels and provide instruction for the corrective and remedial reader using appropriate methods. Students are required to complete a clinical experience.

ED 325 - Teaching Communication Arts II

3.00 Cr
Methods, materials, techniques, and strategies for teaching reading will be presented. The students will study word recognition, comprehension, and metacognition teaching strategies as well as emergent literacy. One-third of this course is devoted to public school classroom work which will be arranged and required for each student.

ED 329 - Music Education in Elem School

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to prepare the elementary teacher to incorporate music into the classroom setting. Students will learn the fundamentals of music, develop music skills, and survey music teaching methods. The course includes a study of musical concepts, repertoire of children's songs, and basic skills on classroom instruments. Students must provide their own guitar.

ED 344 - Secondary Social Studies

2.00 Cr
This course is an examination of selected concepts and generalizations of the social sciences that form the frame-work of contemporary social studies curricula in the secondary school. Students will be asked to develop a defensible rationale for making curricular and instructional decisions concerning the substance of instruction, techniques of instruction, and evaluation practices as unique to the social studies classroom in grades five through 12.

ED 346 - Teaching Science in Sec School

2.00 Cr
This course will examine the techniques and materials used in teaching the physical and biological sciences at the secondary level.

ED 350 - Middle School Teaching

3.00 Cr
This course looks at the sociological, psychological, historical, and philosophical foundations of middle schools. In addition, middle school program, organization, planning, curriculum, and evaluation will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on developing an interdisciplinary unit of study at the middle school level.

ED 403 - Internship

5.00 Cr
A half-day, two-semester field experience program for qualified senior students. The internship will be consecutive, beginning the fall semester of the senior year and ending with the spring semester of the senior year. Due to scheduling of course work, the first semester's internship is in the morning hours, while the second semester's field experience is completed in the afternoon.

ED 404 - Internship

5.00 Cr
A half-day, two-semester field experience program for qualified senior students. The internship will be consecutive, beginning the fall semester of the senior year and ending with the spring semester of the senior year. Due to scheduling of course work, the first semester's internship is in the morning hours, while the second semester's field experience is completed in the afternoon. Prerequisite: ED 318 or ED 325, and acceptance to student teaching. Offered annually.

ED 405 - Education Seminar

2.00 Cr
This capstone seminar is required of all teacher-education students during their student teaching semester. It addresses professional concerns of the classroom teacher, the creation of the Teacher Work Sample, and the final consideration of the college's core curriculum.

ED 407 - Organize/Admn of the Rdng Prog

2.00 Cr
This course develops skills for organizing, managing, and evaluating reading programs for all children (K-12) and presents methods for promoting staff, administration, and community support for reading programs.

ED 408 - Student Teaching- Minor Only

5.00 Cr
For qualified students pursuing professional teacher licensing in a minor endorsement area only, or seeking a second minor endorsement. A full day directed teaching program in the student's minor area. The teaching candidate must not undertake any other duties or college courses during the daytime teaching assignment; student teaching is a full-time responsibility. The program is open to elementary and secondary education majors who are pursuing a minor in a certifiable area and may be completed in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

ED 410 - Student Teaching

12.00 Cr
For qualified students pursing professional teacher licensing in a major, or a major and minor endorsement, area of study. A full day, 15-week directed teaching program in the student's major and minor areas. The teaching candidate must not undertake any other duties or college courses during the daytime teaching assignment; student teaching is a full-time responsibility. The program is open to elementary and secondary education majors and may be completed in either the first or second semester of the senior year.

ED 411 - Teaching Eng on the Sec Level

3.00 Cr
A study of the theories and methods for teaching the communication arts in the secondary schools with special emphasis on teaching literature and composition, as well as contemporary issues within the profession.

ED 412 - Meas & Assessmnt in Teaching

3.00 Cr
This course will look at the role of measurement and assessment in the instructional process. Classroom tests and standardized tests will be analyzed. Gathering, administering and interpreting assessment data will be examined.

ED 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ED 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ENGR 104 - Eng Graphics and CAD Applicat

3.00 Cr
An introduction to modern computer drafting and engineering design using a CAD (computer aided design) software system. Fundamental concepts of technical drawing in two and three dimensions including orthographic projections, isometric projections, three-dimensional and solids modeling, and rendering.

ENGR 105 - Introduction to Engineering

1.00 Cr
A broad-brush overview of the various aspects of engineering with em - phasis on civil engineering and other areas of engineering. After a brief exposure to licensing, ethics and engineering societies, we will jump into the design and construction of bridges made entirely of manila folder material. There will be several guest speakers to introduce students to other areas of engineering like mechanical and chemical. Students will be led through a reverse engineering activity by determining how a simple coffee maker works and the physical processes involved. One or two field trips will take students to various locations in and near Helena to look at engineering in action. Then students will learn about surveying, its role in engineering, and conduct field exercises with a level survey and a resource-grade GPS (global positioning system) unit. Students will learn to work in teams to reach a common goal.

ENGR 155 - Robotics/Experimental Physics

3.00 Cr
Learn how to build and control simple robotic devices, and along the way you will learn the fundamentals of logic and control common to all computer programming languages. We will perform numerous discovery exercises in the laboratory, to introduce and practice experimental methods and mathematical modeling useful for physics. This course satisfies the Core requirement for a laboratory course in the natural sciences. Students who have taken PHYS 205 or CS 120 must have instructor approval to enroll in PHYS 155/ENGR 155. Two two-hour laboratories per week.

ENGR 202 - Water Distribution Systems

1.00 Cr
An introduction to water distribution theory and design practice. A project-oriented course that includes water supply, storage, distribution, and computer analysis of water distribution networks. Spring semester.

ENGR 205 - Civ Engin Materials & Testing

2.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is for students to learn the properties and behaviors of various construction materials that are commonly used in civil engineering projects. Steel, concrete, wood, soil, asphalt, geo-synthetics, pipes, and other materials are studied and tested. In addition, students learn some of the standardized testing procedures for these construction materials.

ENGR 302 - Engineering Mech I: Statics

3.00 Cr
Equilibrium of bodies under the action of forces. Force systems and resultants; equilibrium of mechanical systems; trusses, frames, and machines; centroids and centers of mass; shear and moments in beams; hydrostatics; friction; and virtual work. Introduction to mechanics of solids and computer analysis of structures, as time permits. Emphasis on solving practical engineering problems in complete, documented style.

ENGR 303 - Eng Mechanics II: Solids

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the mechanics of deformable solids. Topics covered include stress, strain, rotation-of-axes transformations, constitutive relations, equilibrium, compatibility requirements, stability, and deformation of structural elements. Uni-axial, torsion, bending, and shear loads on and deformations of prismatic bars are also studied together with Euler buckling of slender columns. Three credits of lecture. Three credits of lecture.

ENGR 304 - Eng Mechanics III: Dynamics

3.00 Cr
Motions of bodies under the action of forces; kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies; work-energy and impulse-momentum; area and mass moments of inertia. Emphasis on solving practical engineering problems in complete, documented style.

ENGR 305 - Electronics/Circuit Anlys I

4.00 Cr
behavior of electrical circuits. Review of current, voltage, and passive circuit elements (resistors, capacitors, and inductors). Kirchhoff's Laws, network theorems, and basic network analysis. General characteristics of amplifiers and electronic instrumentation. Introduction to operational amplifiers and active elements (transistors). Laplace transform analysis of transient (switching) response, and complex phasor analysis of sinusoidal steady-state response. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week, in which students build and test circuits and learn how to use typical circuit simulation software (PSPICE).

ENGR 307 - Fluid Mechanics (WI)

3.00 Cr
A first course in fluid mechanics for engineering majors. Topics covered include fluid properties, fluid statics, fluid motion, pressure variations in fluid flows, momentum principles, energy principles, dimensional analysis and similitude, surface resistance, flow in conduits, flow measurements, drag, and lift. Two and one-half credits of lecture and one-half credit of laboratory.

ENGR 309 - Geotechnical Engineering

3.50 Cr
An introduction to geotechnical engineering. Topics covered include an introduction to geology and the classifications of soils, and rocks, and geologic structures. Soil exploration, testing, and classifications are introduced, and soil characteristics and mechanical properties such as compressibility and compaction, permeability and seepage, and stresses in soil structures are also studied. Three credits of lecture and one half credit of lab.

ENGR 310 - Structures I

3.00 Cr
This is the first in a series of 3 courses in structural analysis and design. The primary objective of this course is to introduce the principles and methods of analysis for trusses, beams, and frames so that students develop the understanding and the skills necessary to analyze and design statically determinate as well as statically indeterminate structures. While emphasis is on modern computer methods of analysis, elementary methods are also studied so students gain an understanding and "feel" for the behavior of structures.

ENGR 311 - Matrix Methods for Structures

1.00 Cr
This course introduces students to matrix methods for analyzing determinate and indeterminate plane truss and plane frame structures, and how these methods are implemented on a computer. The programming architecture used in modern structural analysis programs is presented. This includes: 1) Input of the geometry of the structure, material properties of members, and loads; 2) assembly of the system equations to be solved; 3) solving the system equations for basic unknowns; 4) recovering values of interest from the values for the basic unknowns; and 5) generating output of the results. Students work with the instructor to develop programs to analyze a resistive electrical circuit network, a plane truss, and a plane frame. The programs are tested using problems that have solutions available to test the programs.

ENGR 313 - Hydrology

3.00 Cr
This course focuses primarily on the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle such as precipitation, hydrologic abstractions, catchment properties, groundwater flow, and the relationships between precipitation, abstractions, and runoff. A brief portion of the course deals with the measurement of various components of the hydrologic cycle. The engineering applications of basic hydrologic principles are studied. The purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of hydrologic science, which are used to solve typical engineering problems.

ENGR 315 - Transportation Engineering I

2.00 Cr
This course covers vehicle characteristics, geometric design of highways, earthwork calculations, pavement design, networks, and statistical applications in transportation. Two class hours per week.

ENGR 323 - Water Quality

2.00 Cr
This course teaches sampling methods, analytical techniques, and principles associated with environmental engineering applications. Topics include designing a sampling, groundwater and surface water sampling, field methods, carbonate equilibrium, isotope applications, pathogens in public water, and groundwater and surface-water contamination issues. Students will be guided through these topics with homework problems, field excursions, assigned readings, handouts, guest speakers, and exams.

ENGR 324 - Air Quality

2.00 Cr
This course will provide engineering graduates with sufficient background and tools to understand the principle issues associated with air quality. They will gain an understanding of the science of air pollution and the pollutants of concern, including greenhouse gases, and their chemistry. Students will understand the structure and why laws were formed and needed to regulate the air industry. Students will have experience with air-quality monitoring and the equipment used. Students interested in air quality will be able to be trainable in air quality methods and evaluations.

ENGR 325 - Hydrogeology

3.00 Cr
This course is a basic junior-level hydrogeology course with fundamentals as the primary focus. Students taking the course will be prepared to work in industry and solve problems associated with groundwater resources, environmental clean-up, restoration, and protection of water rights. An emphasis is placed on applications. For this reason the course is ideally suited to professionals who work in the Helena area, such as personnel at DEQ, DNRC, and other state agencies. Topics include groundwater flow and hydraulic head, aquifer tests and analysis, including slug testing, water-quality applications are emphasized. Class activities include weekly homework problems, lectures, applied problems, exams, and a design project.

ENGR 326 - Energy & the Environment (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course will look at the role that energy plays in our modern world. We will learn about the physics of energy so that students can calculate the energy content of a variety of systems, such as: gasoline, other fossil fuels, nuclear, solar, wind, bio mass and so on. Applications of the energy schemes in our lives will then be explored. We will discuss the global use and needs of energy and the environmental problems that have resulted from energy development and how we can improve our community and the world.

ENGR 327 - Land & Stream Restoration

3.00 Cr
This course strives to provide a knowledge and understanding of the current land and stream restoration practices. To achieve this objective, students participate in filed excursions, study earth moving methods and equipment, analyze soil erosion processes, design hydrologic control structures, and study revegetation and stream restoration methods.

ENGR 329 - Public Health & Environment

3.00 Cr
This course provides students with an introduction to and overview of the key areas and principles of environmental health. Students will gain an understanding of 1) the interaction between individuals, communities, and the environment, 2) the impacts of various environmental agents on the health of the public, and 3) specific applications of environmental health and environmental engineering. Topics to be covered include environmental policy and regulation, agents of environmental disease, and practices for water quality, air quality, food safety and waste disposal.

ENGR 342 - Thermal Physics

3.00 Cr
An introduction to classical thermodynamics and statistical descriptions of many-particle systems. The first five weeks of the course provide an introduction to thermodynamics: definition of the fundamental state variables (temperature, pressure, energy, enthalpy, entropy) and formulation of the three laws of thermodynamics. Subsequent topics include diffusion and the random-walk problem, characterization of statistical ensembles and the meaning of equilibrium, partition functions, free energies, and entropy. The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for classical systems is contrasted with the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions of quantum-mechanical systems. Three hours lecture per week.

ENGR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENGR 389G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENGR 401 - Hydraulics

3.00 Cr
Hydraulic engineering is the application of fluid mechanic principles to deal with collection, storage, conveyance, distribution, control, regulation, measurement, and use of water. This course will focus primarily on analysis and design of pipelines, pumps, and open channel flow systems. The course will also have a design project to provide an opportunity to apply the information in a real engineering situation. Three class hours per week.

ENGR 402 - Environmental Engineering

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on environmental problems, including their causes, the scientific background needed to understand them, and the methods used to solve them. The fundamental principles of environmental engineering, including sources of water and air pollution, water and wastewater treatment, solid and hazardous waste management, and regulatory issues are presented. Three class hours per week.

ENGR 403 - Structures II Steel Design

3.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is to learn the philosophies and methods of AISC Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) and AISC Allowable Stress Design (ASD) of steel structures. Emphasis is on the determination of loads and load distribution, and the design of structural components (i.e., tension members, compression members, beams, and beam-columns) and their connections, in accordance with the AISC Design Specification and the AISC Manual of Steel Construction. The function and behavior of simple frame structures is also introduced and each student works on a team to complete a design project. Three hours of class per week.

ENGR 405 - Water and Wastewater

4.00 Cr
This course focuses on the fundamental principles for analysis and design of water processing, water supply planning, wastewater collection planning, wastewater treatment, and sludge processing systems. Three class hours and 2 lab hours per week.

ENGR 406 - Structures III

2.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is to learn the philosophy and methods of ACI strength design of reinforced concrete structures. Emphasis is the design of concrete structural elements including beams, one-way slabs, and columns. The student works on a team to complete a simple design project. There are two class hours per week.

ENGR 409 - Transportation Engineering II

3.00 Cr
This course covers the basics of traffic engineering, traffic control, human characteristics as they relate to transportation, engineering transportation standards, planning, public policy, and contemporary and future transportation issues. Three class hours per week.

ENGR 411 - Senior Design Project I

2.00 Cr
This course requires the students, working in teams, to take an actual engineering project from the initial proposal stage through the preliminary design phase. Students will conduct the necessary activities and prepare the various documents needed to complete the preliminary design. One class hour per week.

ENGR 412 - Senior Design Project II

2.00 Cr
A continuation of ENGR 411, the design process will continue from the preliminary phase to the completion of a conceptual design of the project. The students, working in teams, will prepare design criteria, calculations, and representative engineering drawings of the project's major components. A list and general description of the many details and other miscellaneous activities required to complete the project will also be prepared. Finally, general cost estimates will be computed. Two class hours per week.

ENGR 424 - Groundwater Flow Modeling

3.00 Cr
This course provides a hands-on experience in converting hydrogeologic data, using GIS-like tools, into a simulated groundwater-flow system, using state-of-the-art software. This course presents sufficient theory and allows practical application in the lab to correctly conceptualize, construct, and calibrate groundwater-flow models. This start-to-finish experience will allow the participant to perform applications in industry.

ENGR 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

ENGR 444 - Computational Mthds:ENGR Mech

4.00 Cr
This course gives a general introduction to numerical solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations. Most examples are applications in structural mechanics; however, the techniques are generally applicable to all areas of engineering. The first part of the course is devoted to solving ordinary differential equations by approximate methods including finite differences, direct variational methods, weighted residuals, and energy based approximations both global and local (finite element) approximating functions. In the second part of the course, the preceding techniques are extended to obtain approximate solutions for partial differential equations for mixed boundary and initial boundary value problems.

ENGR 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENGR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENGR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ENLE 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLE 200 - Literary Studies (WI)

3.00 Cr
Required of all majors and minors in English, this course acquaints students with literature as both an academic discipline and an art by developing the analytical and critical skills required for more sophisticated readings of literary works. By studying the literary techniques of exemplary authors, students also discover ways in which attentive reading might stimulate and guide their own writing. Along with introducing students to the vocabulary and methods of reading literary works from psycho-analytic, feminist, historicist, reader-response, and other critical perspectives, the course provides training and practice in writing literary exposition.

ENLE 332 - English Grammar

3.00 Cr
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to English grammar. It begins with a definition of grammar and then moves on to a discussion of prescriptive and descriptive ideas about grammar, grammatical prototypes, and several kinds of grammatical analysis-the traditional Reed- Kellogg diagramming and phrase structure trees. Topics include parts of the simple sentence, word classes, phrase and clause structure, sentence types, aspect, mood, voice, and the grammatical aspects of prose style.

ENLE 333 - History of English Language

3.00 Cr
The study of the origins, development and linguistic structures of Indo-European languages as cultural phenomena. Special attention is devoted to the linguistic, semantic and cultural history of the English language as it has evolved from an obscure Germanic tongue to a prominent world language. Topics include the design features of language, linguistic variation, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis, semantics, pragmatics, and the major historical forms of English.

ENLE 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLE 404 - Literary Theory & Criticism

3.00 Cr
A study of the theory and practice of literary criticism. Students will learn about and apply a variety of theories, such as formalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, feminist, deconstructionist, reader-response, historicist, and post-colonial.

ENLE 411 - Teaching Eng on the Sec Level

3.00 Cr
A study of the theories and methods for teaching the communication arts in the secondary schools with special emphasis on teaching literature and composition, as well as contemporary issues within the profession.

ENLE 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENLT 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 215 - Introduction to Literature

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 215N - Intro to Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 216 - Intro to Literature (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 216N - Intro to Literature WI ND

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the basic reading and analytical skills needed to understand and appreciate literature. Students will become familiar with reading different literary genres (prose, poetry, and drama) and learn to use basic terms and techniques of literary analysis. They will develop multiple interpretations and responses to literary texts and support their interpretation and responses with textual evidence, both in discussions and writing. Also, they will discover how texts communicate cultural values and ideas through a variety of approaches to the reading and appreciation of literature. Offerings each semester range from an overview of literature through conventional genres to exploration of a limited historical period or topic in literature.

ENLT 289N - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 303 - Medieval English Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written in Britain during the Old English period (8th century to 1066) and Middle English period (1066 to 1485), key periods in the formation of English language and culture. Principal genres include epic and lyric poetry, romance, tale, and drama. Representative works include the epic Beowulf, the mystery and morality plays, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Margery Kempe's autobiography, and Arthurian romances.

ENLT 323 - Renaissance English Lit

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written in Britain during the 16th and 17th centuries, which accompanied the spread of human-ism, an emergent nationalism, and the civil strife of the latter period. Principle genres include drama and poetry. Representative authors include Sir Thomas More, Edmund Spenser, Sir Philip Sidney, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Amelia Lanier, the Metaphysical and Cavalier poets, Lady Mary Wroth, and John Milton.

ENLT 334 - World Literature (GD)

3.00 Cr
Critical and comparative study of selected representative literary works from African, Arabic, Latin American, and Oriental literature.

ENLT 365 - Young Adult Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written for young adults. Students will read, listen to and evaluate a wide variety of literature published for or enjoyed by young adult readers, including traditional folk tales, myths, and legends; fantasy and realistic fiction; biography and autobiography; and poetry. Students will also study techniques for teaching and using literature in the 5-12 classroom.

ENLT 367 - 19th Cent Brit Lit: Victorians

3.00 Cr
The study of literature written in Britain from 1830-1900. The course focuses on representations of individual and national identity emerging amidst sweeping social, political, and economic change. Representative works include novels by the Brontes, Dickens Eliot, Hardy, Wilde; non-fiction prose by Carlyle and Mill;- poetry by Tennyson, the Brownings and the Rosettis.

ENLT 373 - 19th Century U.S. Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of major currents of nineteenth-century literature of the United States, from the antebellum period, through the Civil War, to the very beginnings of the twentieth century. The course may explore any of the following literary movements: the Romantic movement, including Transcendentalist writers and philosophers (e.g., Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau), as well as the writers of the Romance fiction (such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville); mid-century domestic fiction (including such writers as Louisa May Alcott and Harriet Beecher Stowe); slave narratives (Harriet Jacobs and Fredrick Douglas, among others); and American Realism, including major proponents of realism at the end of the century, such as mark Twain, William Dean Howells, and Henry James, so-called "local color writers," such as Sarah Orne Jewett and Mary Wilkins Freeman, and turn-of-the-century naturalist writers such as Frank Norris and Theodore Dreiser.

ENLT 383 - 20th Century British Lit

3.00 Cr
A study of British literature written in the 20th century, shaped by the critical shifts in thought and literary technique associated with modernism and postmodernism. Each movement, developing in the wake of a World War, is characterized by a major break with literary tradition. Principal genres include poetry, drama, novels, short fiction and the essay. Representative authors include William Butler Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Doris Lessing, Seamus Heaney, Iris Murdoch, Tom Stoppard, and Caryl Churchill.

ENLT 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 393 - Jazz Age & Harlem Renais (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of early twentieth-century American literature (called "modernism"), from World War I through the 1930s. The course explores the work of white modernist writers (many of whom were part of the expatriate community in Paris during the period) alongside that of the African American writers of the same period who lived in the United States and participated in the movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. Among the writers studied may be Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, T.S. Eliot, H.D. William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Claude McKay, Nella Larson, and W.E.B Du Bois.

ENLT 397 - 20th Century U.S. Literature

3.00 Cr
A study of American literature from the beginning of the Second World War (1939) to the present. Particular focus is given to anti-establishment literature protesting the cultural conformity of the 1950s, the counterculture writers of the 1960s and early 70s and the post-modern writers of the 1980s and 90s. Includes representative literary movements such as the Agrarian writers, Beat writers, the confessional poets, the Vietnam writers, and a wide variety of ethnic writers producing literature in traditional and experimental forms. Representative authors include Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Eudora Welty, Marianne Moore, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O'Connor, Robert Lowell, Tennessee Williams, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, Arthur Miller, Tim O'Brien, Nikki Giovanni, Alice Walker, Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday, Edward Albee, David Mamet and Maria Irene Fornes.

ENLT 410 - Women's Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written by women, exploring what it means when women become the center of their own stories. The subtitle of the course will help define the focus: it may focus on writings by women from Britain, the U.S., any ethnic and/or national group, or a combination of any of the above. The course may focus on one century, a more limited historical period, or span several. Feminist literary and cultural theory may be an added focus. Writers may include: Jane Austen, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Gloria Anzaldua.

ENLT 411 - African American Lit (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of the history of African American literature. The course begins with early writings by slaves (these may include Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Jacobs); moves through the nineteenth century to study the Harlem Renaissance writers of the early twentieth century (including W.E.B. Du Bois, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston); continues into the twentieth century to investigate post-World War II works (by such writers as Ralph Ellison, Lorraine Hansbury, and Gwendolyn Brooks); and ends with investigating contemporary African American texts (these may include novels by Toni Morrison and movies directed by Spike Lee).

ENLT 412 - Native American Authors (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written by American Indian authors, beginning with the cultural traditions and influences within oral literature, then moving through the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This exploration continues through the works of the twentieth century, surveying poetry, fiction, and non-fiction by authors such as N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, Wendy Rose, Paula Gunn Allen, Leslie Marmon Silko, Luci Tapahonso, Louis Owens, Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, and Montana American Indian authors D?Arcy McNickle and James Welch.

ENLT 413 - U.S. Latino/a Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course offers students an in-depth look at Latinx (latin ex) literary movements within the United States and perspectives of peripheral US Latinx identities in the XX and XXI centuries. The class will discuss Chicano, Puerto Rican, Dominican and Cuban cultural movements and social dynamics at length, with some discussion of other Hispanic Diasporas within the US. Students will read short stories, drama, essays and poetry (in English) in their exploration of the US Latinx canon. Music, film, podcasts and interviews will also be incorporated as important structural elements to the course. By the end of this course students should be familiar with US Latinx perspectives of ethnicity, immigration, identity, nationalism, freedom, gender, sexuality and political and social power differentials. Students will also further develop their critical reading and writing skills through assigned work.

ENLT 423 - Shakespeare

3.00 Cr
A study of the dramatic and poetic art of William Shakespeare. Plays from both the Elizabethan and Jacobean pe-riods will be selected to illustrate the development of the author?s style and theatrical conventions, with representation from the histories, the comedies, the Roman plays, the tragedies, the problem plays, and the late romances. Students will develop their critical faculties by applying a variety of recent approaches to Shakespearean scholarship.

ENLT 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENLT 489N - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENLT 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ENWR 101 - Basic Composition

3.00 Cr
This course covers the basic elements of writing-grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraphs. It is also concerned with audience, voice, and techniques for generating and organizing ideas into an essay, as well as introduction to the library.

ENWR 102 - College Composition II

4.00 Cr
A preparation for students to write within the larger academic community. Students study conventions of effective writing for various types of academic essays, including research papers. Includes instruction in online and library research.

Placement determined by score on national exams or passing grade in ENWR 101.

ENWR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 264 - Intro Creative Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
After preliminary instruction in the basic elements and techniques of creative writing, students create original works of poetry and fiction and polish them in workshops with other members of the class. The course is open to those who have not had a poetry or fiction writing course in college.

ENWR 302 - Expository Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
The study and practice of advanced exposition, including creative non-fiction genres and argumentation. Students read professional writers and critique classmates' drafts. The course emphasizes techniques for revising and polishing expository prose. Prerequisite: ENWR 102 or consent of instructor.

ENWR 303 - Grant Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course provides students with knowledge and skills in the grant writing process. Through a combination of readings, lectures, assignments and a full written grant proposal, students will gain knowledge and experience in the major elements of grant writing, including grant sources, grant proposals, timelines, budgets, informed consent forms, the review process and grant management.

ENWR 305 - Workplace Writing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course prepares students to meet the demands of workplace writing in business, administrative, and technical fields. Focused on understanding the reader as a basis for planning and drafting documents, students work on discovering the purpose, structure, and appropriate level of detail for on-the-job writing. Practice is offered in a variety of workplace genres, including flyers, instructions, brochures, webpages, proposals, letters, memos, resumes, formal and informal reports. Students also cultivate workplace style, especially in the areas of clarity, concision, cohesion, and correctness. Attention also given to formatting documents in professional ways.

ENWR 306 - Writing for the Media (WI)

3.00 Cr
Students learn basic elements of journalistic writing for the print media, including news reporting, feature writing, and column writing. Course includes study of libel law, observation of community media, and production of one issue of the school newspaper. Students will learn AP Style, the gold standard for journalistic writing.

ENWR 347 - Creative Writing (WI):

3.00 Cr
In-depth study and practice of a major genre or mode of contemporary writing, such as drama, memoir, or nature writing. Topic selected by the instructor.

ENWR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 425 - ENWR Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

ENWR 461 - Adv Creative Writing (WI)

1.00 Cr
Advanced Creative Writing is a weekly meeting of experienced writers of poetry and fiction (and other genres) for the purpose of honing their skills through a semester of extensive writing and rigorous workshops with other advanced student writers. Students who take the course for fewer than three credits are given reduced submission requirements, but must still attend and participate in all workshop meetings. Since the course is a workshop, the content varies from year to year.

ENWR 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ENWR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ENWR 498 - Capstone Seminar (WI)

3.00 Cr
The English Capstone Workshop is a writing course in which advanced English majors practice professional writing and presentation skills and aid one another in the further development of these skills. The course is required for all English majors who are in the last fall semester of study before graduation. Members of the class plan the Carroll College Literary Festival, held on campus in November; they propose, organize, and coordinate sessions on subjects of interest in literature, writing, and English Educatio and they issue calls for papers to English majors and other interested parties for presentation at the conference. Students then spend the semester writing senior projects, regularly subjecting submitting drafts the texts they are working on to intensive workshops by the other members of the class. They then present portions of their final project at the literary festival.

ENWR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ES 121 - Environmental Science

4.00 Cr
An introductory course focusing on the scientific analysis of environmental issues. Using core concepts from physics, chemistry, biology and earth science, students will exam key issues associated with sustaining biodiversity, natural resources, environmental health, and human societies. Topics will include ecological principles; land, water and energy use; epidemiology and toxicology; air, water and solid waste pollution; ecological economics; and environmental policy, law and planning. The course includes a laboratory and fulfills the CORE requirement for Natural Sciences. Required for Environmental Studies: Environmental Policy and Project Management majors. Open to all Carroll students.

ES 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ES 200 - Environmental Beta

2.00 Cr
Environmental Beta is an experiential course designed to introduce students to the many perspectives from which they can engage with the natural world. The course begins with a week-long river trip down the Missouri River where students and faculty explore the integration of the scientific, social, political, historical and spiritual aspects of a wilderness landscape. Faculty from the Environmental program will be joined by faculty from anthropology, philosophy, English, other humanities and social sciences. Students will develop skills in the observation, description and interpretation of the natural world, building connections with the land, the Carroll faculty, and with each other. The second part of the course includes weekly meetings or field trips exploring the many and diverse environmental careers that students may pursue. From non-profits, to government agencies to outdoor education, student will hear from the different professional who have followed or found careers preserving, protecting, restoring, or teaching about the environment.

ES 201 - Environmental Practicum

1.00 Cr
A practical exploration of an environmental issue on the Carroll College campus, or encompassing the campus and the local community, through class analysis of the issue and concrete engagement with its resolution. The course may be taken for credit of to three times in different semesters, with an exploration of at least two different topics/projects.

ES 205 - Human Ecology

3.00 Cr
This class will focus on how humans interact with their environment, concentrating on biological, social and economic aspects. The course will investigate the principles of evolutionary theory with special emphasis on human behavior and cultural diversity. The class will examine adaptive design of traits, behaviors, and life histories of humans in an ecological context, including the role of social and cultural factors in the maintenance or disruption of ecosystems, contemporary ecological concerns and conservation ecology.

ES 220 - Topics in Conserv Biology

3.00 Cr
A course designed to improve the scientific literacy of students interested in solving the conservation/environmental challenges that result from overuse of natural resources. Using concepts and practices from taxonomy, ecology, genetics, and geography, conservation biology seeks the most effective strategies for addressing threats to biological diversity, ecological integrity and environmental health. The course will be divided into roughly 50 percent lecture/discussion and 50 percent laboratory and thus, fulfills the CORE requirements for Natural Science. The course will change geographic focus from year to year to allow students to take the course more than once and explore different bioregions. The neotropics (Latin America) will be the geographic focus in even numbered years and will fulfill a requirement for the Latin American Studies Minor.

ES 250 - Field Zoology: Entomology

2.00 Cr
With an ever-growing concern about the conservation of biodiversity, there is increasing emphasis on developing skills and techniques to inventory species distributions and to monitor population dynamics. Field sampling techniques and skills in taxonomy are crucial to conservation surveillance. This course is an introduction to basic field and curator skills necessary to collect, manage and maintain specimen data for biological inventory and monitoring. The specific aims for this ten-week experience are: 1) to develop collection techniques in a field setting; 2) to practice processing and management of specimens and associated data; 3) to communicate findings to Montana stake holders. Topics vary and will rotate through Entomology, Ichthyology, Herpetology, Mammalogy, and Ornithology.

ES 251 - Field Zoology: Herpetology

2.00 Cr
With an ever-growing concern about the conservation of biodiversity, there is increasing emphasis on developing skills and techniques to inventory species distributions and to monitor population dynamics. Field sampling techniques and skills in taxonomy are crucial to conservation surveillance. This course is an introduction to basic field and curator skills necessary to collect, manage and maintain specimen data for biological inventory and monitoring. The specific aims for this ten-week experience are: 1) to develop collection techniques in a field setting; 2) to practice processing and management of specimens and associated data; 3) to communicate findings to Montana stake holders. Topics vary and will rotate through Entomology, Ichthyology, Herpetology, Mammalogy, and Ornithology.

ES 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ES 300 - Environmental Field Studies

3.00 Cr
Designed as a field immersion experience followed by an open-ended project experience, students will practice basic field techniques, collect original data and complete at least one analytical project. Examples of field experiences include: Winter Ecology in Yellowstone, Alaska Landscape Dynamics, Tropical Ecology, and Natural History of Montana.

ES 300G - Environmental Field Study(GD)

3.00 Cr
Designed as a field immersion experience followed by an open-ended project experience, students will practice basic field techniques, collect original data and complete at least one analytical project. Examples of field experiences include: Winter Ecology in Yellowstone, Alaska Landscape Dynamics, Tropical Ecology, and Natural History of Montana. Global Diversity may apply when it is offered as a study abroad.

ES 304 - Environmental Field Methods

4.00 Cr
This course is designed to introduce students to the various field methods employed in the broad field of environmental science. Interdisciplinary in nature, environmental problems often require understanding and integration across disciplines and an understanding of how data is collected and analyzed. Environmental scientists may find themselves interpreting geologic maps, sampling soils, or designing inventory or monitoring projects. An understanding of the concepts and practices in each of these disciplines will prepare students to evaluate and use existing data, or to design new field-based investigations.

Prerequisites: EAS 101, MA 207 or permission of instructor.

ES 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ES 395 - Comm in Envir Research (WI)

3.00 Cr
An analysis of selected environment-related writings and a discussion of selected environmental themes with presentations by students and faculty and invited lectures as available.

ES 400 - Environmental Omega

1.00 Cr
Environmental Omega is a senior capstone experience where students compile a final portfolio of the work they have completed over the course of their degree, reflect on internship/research and/or field experiences, and chart a path for the future. Meeting once a week, students will come together as a peer -working group as they prepare applications for graduate school or employment.

ES 401 - Environmental Impact Assessmnt

3.00 Cr
This class is designed to provide an analytical overview of the theory and practice of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is used to identify potential environmental impacts of various activities and to propose means to avoid or reduce the significant impacts. The class will concentrate on understanding the role of NEPA in regards to environmental management, including the strengths and limitations. The class will utilize application exercises and expert guest speakers to present examples of current NEPA practices.

ES 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
A one-semester focus on an environmental issue explored through a working association with a federal or state agency, a private enterprise, a community group, or a non-profit organization.

ES 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

ES 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

ES 498 - Environmental Research

1.00 Cr
A senior year research paper or research project, in lieu of an honors thesis, focused on a specific environmental issue; the paper or project should provide evidence of scholarship in and integration of scientific, social scientific, and humanities analyses of or perspectives on the issue; presented to the department faculty and student peers.

ES 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

FR 101 - Elementary French I (GD)

3.00 Cr
A beginning course in French with emphasis on speaking with attention to reading and writing as well. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation alternate weeks.

FR 101MM - Beginning French I

4.00 Cr
The Beginning French 1 course is based upon the four essential means of language acquisition; through reading, writing, listening and speaking. All of the contents of this course will be approached from this holistic perspective in order to immerse the student into the French language. This is the introduction to French language; its letters, phonetics, spelling, vocabulary and initial grammatical rules will be covered.

FR 102 - Elementary French II (GD)

3.00 Cr
A beginning course in French with emphasis on speaking with attention to reading and writing as well. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation alternate weeks.

FR 102MM - Beginning French II

4.00 Cr
The course content for Beginning French 2 is based upon the four essential means of language acquisition; through reading, writing, listening and speaking. This is the continuation of the introduction to French language now focusing more specifically on vocabulary acquisition, phrases, grammatical rules and structures. Listening and oral exercises will be more heavily relied upon in order to help instill French fluency.

FR 150 - French Immersion Abroad (GD)

3.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR 201MM - Intermediate French I

4.00 Cr
This course is based on an innovative, structured and practical method. It is structured around well-articulated activities that allow for a progressive acquisition of a range of linguistic competencies. The objective is to lead the student to confront varied communicative situations by introducing different tasks and soliciting an active participation. While the course is not based on a single theme, the main objective is the acquisition of language skills for increased fluency. The course largely follows the textbook, Tempo 2.

FR 202MM - Intermediate French II

4.00 Cr
Intermediate French II builds on the competencies acquired in Intermediate French I, revisiting and further developing the learned skills. This course also develops communication skills, allowing students to participate in conversations and demonstrate their linguistic capabilities in terms of being able to speak with a degree of fluency. The course largely follows the textbook, Tempo 2.

FR 203 - Intermediate French (GD)

3.00 Cr
Reading of contemporary texts with conversation and composition. Directed toward the development of a speaking, writing, and reading knowledge of French. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation alternate weeks.

FR 204 - Intermediate French (GD)

3.00 Cr
Reading of contemporary texts with conversation and composition. Directed toward the development of a speaking, writing, and reading knowledge of French. Three (3) class periods and one supervised conversation alternate weeks.

FR 250 - French Immersion Abroad (GD)

3.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR 301 - LittŽrature francophone GD

3.00 Cr
LittŽrature francophone de l'Afrique Francophone et des Antilles Franaises A study of representative written passages from various authors of Francophone Africa and the French Antilles. Analysis of various readings in both discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts, history, and present political situation of the countries studied (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Niger, Mali, Senegal, Burkina-Faso, Martinique, and Guadeloupe). An allied class of the minor in Latin American Studies.

FR 301MM - Advanced French I

3.00 Cr
Learning a foreign language is first and foremost an opening onto the world, or an entryway to a new universe that is at once linguistic, cultural, sociological, literary, etc. By delving deeper into oral comprehension and written French (pulled from multiple sources), students will be able to discover different realities and different points of view. Learning a foreign language is also a tool that allows one to build metaphorical bridges to reach the "Other." Active listening, engaged speaking, and a capacity to clearly express oneself through writing make connections with people from other cultures and language backgrounds possible. Moreover, it is clear that, in today's world, a mastery of several languages is an incalculable advantage on the job market. Based on these premises, this course aims to develop a mastery of diverse components of the French language by means of an action-oriented approach. Following the methods of this pedagogical approach, this course is focused on different projects that reflect concrete learning situations that help students develop French language skills (reading, speaking, listening, and writing). Because the student will be in Morocco while taking the course, the projects will be grounded in a Moroccan context. This will enable them to enrich their understanding of the country, have otherwise unlikely encounters, and practice French in different interactions. The grammar topics will be based on perceived gaps in students' knowledge and will be pursued in collaboration with the professor and students throughout the course.

FR 302 - French Lit - 18th Cent GD WI

3.00 Cr
French Literature Through the 18th Century . A study of representative oral and written passages from various authors of French literature from the Middle Ages through the 18th century. Analysis of the readings and listening programs in both discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts and the history of that period.

FR 303 - Adv Grammar & CompositionGDWI

3.00 Cr
Advanced Grammar and Composition. This course is designed to strengthen students' comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful written language context. This objective will be accomplished through a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. Students will learn to write creatively as well as in both expository and argumentative formats. The course will be conducted in French.

FR 304 - FR &Francophone Civil/Cult GD

3.00 Cr
Introduction to French and Francophone Civilization and Culture. This course introduces students to French civilization and culture from the Middle Ages through the 20th century, and is intended to be taken after FR 303. Students will read a variety of primary source documents in French, and will be introduced to major historical, cultural, and literary movements during these time periods, as well as major French thinkers and writers. The course assignments will focus on written and cultural competency. During the semester, students will learn how to read both critically and creatively, analyzing the strategies that different authors use to express their ideas, create their literary worlds, and engage the reader. The course will focus on interpretation in both oral and written form. The analytical approach presented in this course will prepare students for more advanced classes in literature and culture. The course aims, then, to expose students to a wide range of French-language texts and encourage learners to create more critical, insightful and engaging readings of texts.

FR 350 - French Immersion Abroad (GD)

3.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: FR 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with French, FR 250 for students who have successfully completed FR 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French, and FR 350 for students who have successfully completed FR 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with French. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the French language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of French both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak French on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

FR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR 401 - FR Lit & the 19th Cent(GD WI)

3.00 Cr
French Literature and the 19th Century. A study of representative oral and written passages from various French authors of the 19th century (FR 401) and the 20th century (FR 402). Analysis of readings and listening programs in discussions and compositions. The course also covers the arts and history of that period.

FR 415 - French Lab Coordinator

1.00 Cr
This course meets once weekly to coordinate the French labs offered by upper-division French students. Students receive training in Second Language Acquisition and SLA pedagogy. Discussions focus on theories of SLA, as well as on the creation of weekly lesson plans for the French labs.

FR 423 - Francophone Feminisms GD WI

3.00 Cr
This course serves as an introduction to movements and theories of feminism in France and the French-speaking world, and is intended to be taken following at least one 300-level course. Students learn about the history and theories of feminism that emerged in the French language from the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Course readings will include a range of literary, cultural, and theoretical texts; class discussions and lectures will focus on understandings of feminisms (First, Second, and Third Waves, as well as forms of proto-feminism before the Revolution) and of the female condition in France. This class is taught in French.

FR 433 - Vis.Arts Francophone World-WI

3.00 Cr
Visual Arts of the Francophone World. This course examines French and Francophone visual arts from the Middle Ages to the 20th century, and is intended to be taken following at least one 300-level course. Students learn about major artistic movements in France through techniques of both art historical and literary study. Course readings will include a range of literary, cultural, and theoretical texts; class discussions and lectures will focus on understandings techniques of art historical analysis, as well as the history and development of the visual arts in France and the French-speaking world. This class is taught in French. Satisfies Core Fine Arts requirement.

FR 450 - French Nationalism(s) GD WI

3.00 Cr
This takes as its point of departure a number of myths and symbols that are woven into the fabric of the French national identity. These historical personalities and events-from Charlemagne to Joan of Arc to the Wars of Religion-help members of the French nation define what it means to be French. But they are also interpretations of historical events and movements rather than reproductions of them. Using a comparative framework, we look at how certain history is put to use in the construction and upkeep of national consciousness. Class time will consist of presentations and discussions led by the professor and students. Coursework will include analysis of model texts, short writing exercises, formal oral presentations, multiple draft compositions, and a final project based on analysis of a chosen theme. In-class instruction and discussion are in French only. Satisfies Core Social Science requirement.

FR 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

FR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR 489W - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

FR 495 - French Capstone

3.00 Cr
Students will work with their major advisor on a final project. These projects may include an internship, writing or performance of a dramatic work, or a written research paper with approval from the student's advisor. The final project will be presented to a public audience in a formal or informal setting. The student will work with the French Program faculty to organize, prepare and present their project. This course is offered as needed at the discretion of the department and should be taken during the final semester of a student's senior year, or during the fall semester if a student chooses to study abroad in the spring. This course is required for graduation from the French Program.

FR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

GIS 110 - Introduction to GIS

2.00 Cr
This course will cover the principles and application of Geographic Information Systems. Topics covered include spatial data models, obtaining and creating spatial data, GPS, GIS databases, spatial analysis, raster analysis and cartographic modeling. The emphasis is on hands on use of GIS software and data.

GIS 220 - GIS Databases

3.00 Cr
This course will cover the principles of spatial database design as well as the Integration of various spatial and non-spatial data formats into GIS databases. The course will focus on using current GIS technologies and trends in spatial data management design, create and manage GIS databases. Topics to be covered include GIS and relational database design as well as Integration of disparate data sources such as CAD, GPS and surveying data.

GIS 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

GIS 315 - Spatial Analysis

3.00 Cr
GIS 315 will bring together concepts from previous GIS courses by practical application of methods and procedures used in GIS. The focus will be on using real world project examples and exercises to provide advanced instruction on GIS analytical models and techniques and prepare students to be able to complete professional level GIS projects from start to finish. Automated model development is also covered.

GIS 316 - Raster Analysis

3.00 Cr
This course will give students experience in application and issues surrounding using raster GIS data such as the raster structure (its advantages and limitations), appropriate data and procedures, surface modeling and 3D datasets. Integration of remote sensing data into raster GIS datasets will also be covered. Other topics will include: vector to raster conversion, resampling, raster modeling/map algebra, interpolation and digital terrain modeling and analysis.

GIS 430 - GIS Project

1.00 Cr
The GIS Senior Project course demonstrates the student's ability to apply their knowledge and expertise in geospatial science and technologies to a problem in their major or area of interest. This course may be taken in conjunction with a Senior Thesis, Senior Project, Honors Thesis or other Project based class in a major with the consent of both instructors. The GIS Senior Project should address a moderately complex issue that is appropriate for detailed investigation using geospatial techniques.

GIS 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

GK 201 - Ancient Greek (GD)

3.00 Cr

This is a language course for students wishing to learn to read Ancient Greek. The course provides an introduction to Classical Greek morphology and syntax, and will include work on the alphabet/conventions of Classical pronunciation; grammar, vocabulary, and translation from Greek to English.

GK 202 - Introductory Greek (GD)

3.00 Cr
The ancient Greeks have never ceased speaking to those who will listen. This introductory course and its intermediate sequel aim to help students acquire as quickly and efficiently as possible the requisite linguistic knowledge, skills, and habits to enable them to engage the likes of Herodotus, Plato, Homer, Thucydides, Luke, and Paul on their own terms, in their own tongue. Utilizing both a continuous, culturally rich narrative, reflective of Greek syntax and style, as well as authentic extracts from ancient and biblical authors, this fascinating transcultural exercise in communication across time will afford opportunities to compare and contrast aspects of language and life, and invite exploration into areas of personal interest.

Fulfills Global Diversity requirement.

Offered at the discretion of the department.

GK 302 - Ancient Intermediate Greek(GD

3.00 Cr
Continuing the modus operandi of GK 201-202, this course builds upon the fundamentals of morphology, syntax, vocabulary acquisition, and word-formation principles, with increasing emphasis upon elements of style and how to approach a wide variety of authentic texts. This includes exposure to dialectical variations between the Attic, Ionic, and Koine (NT) dialects.

Prerequisite: GK 201-202.

Fulfills Global Diversity requirement.

Offered at the discretion of the department.

GNDR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

GNDR 206 - Perspectives on Gender (ND)

3.00 Cr
Perspectives on Gender takes an interdisciplinary look at males and females in society. With rotating faculty from various departments, we will explore how various academic disciplines address gender issues. Topics covered may include: the history of the women's movement; the biological basis of gender distinctions; feminists ethics; gender representations in the media; feminist literary theory; gender and religion; issues of gender in the business world; issues of gender in science; gender issues in children's literature.

GNDR 225 - Sociology of Gender

3.00 Cr
While there are biological differences between the sexes, in this course we will explore the social aspects of gender from a sociological perspective. From this view, gender is treated as separate from sex, because gender is the study of differing social expectations for people according to their sex. We will examine how gender is defined, constructed, and reinforced within society, and how all this relates to gender identities and gender inequality. With a critical eye on gender's social construction, we will address issues of gender acquisition and explore the interactions between gender and other socially-constructed categories such as race/ethnicity and class as well as social institutions.

GNDR 258 - Theology & Gender

3.00 Cr
This course examines how gender-with its pervasive historical-cultural meanings-has given shape to and challenged Christianity. It studies how biblical texts, religious practices and traditions, and theological discourse have been skewed through a "patriarch-ization" of Christianity. It critically examines how becoming androcentric has eclipsed the experience of women and even led to their oppression. Finally the course explores how various forms of feminist theologies attempt to incorporate the experience of women, to retrieve their contributions, and to enrich Christianity with many new and life-giving symbols, forms of thought and ways of living.

GNDR 261 - Philosophy & Gender

3.00 Cr
An investigation of main concepts and key issues at the heart of gender feminist studies. Particular attention is devoted to the examination of major theories, their specific contributions, their critique, and the broad spectrum of perspectives at stake.

GNDR 280 - Gender Communication (ND)

3.00 Cr
Examination of interactive relationships between gender and communication in contemporary American society. Course will explore ways that communication creates and perpetuates gender roles and how socially created gender roles are enacted in public and private settings. Students will connect research to everyday lives.

GNDR 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

GNDR 309 - Gender History

3.00 Cr
While feminism, masculinity, and gender as fields of study within the dis - cipline of History are relative newcomers, complex and varied interactions among people have existed since our first human ancestors. Beginning with a short Introduction to the science of sex and gender we consider the possibility that while there may be two chromosomal sexes, constructs of gender are more complex and nuanced. Throughout the semester we will consider the many ways in which notions of women, men and gender are shaped by a broad range of forces including history, culture, religion, and place, as well as how gender norms and expectations have shaped the world and its peoples. Utilizing a wide variety of sources including scholarly texts, art, literature, social media, and film, we will together consider questions of feminism and masculinity, the body and sexuality, marriage, faith and much more as not only integral to a better understanding of history but also part of conversations currently taking place among people all over the world.

GNDR 310 - Human Sexuality

3.00 Cr
This course will examine human sexuality from a biopsychosocial perspective. We will consider the biological, psychological, and social factors that influence sexual behaviors, attitudes, and values. We will gain an understanding of the diversity of sexual behaviors and lifestyles, particularly focusing on human sexuality in the United States. Students will enhance their critical thinking skills through the investigation of scientific evidence for each of the topics covered. Finally, this course requires openness and respect of diverse perspectives to enable students to explore and develop their unique views about human sexuality.

GNDR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

GNDR 410 - Women's Literature (ND)

3.00 Cr
A study of literature written by women, exploring what it means when wom en become the center of their own stories. The subtitle of the course will help define the focus: it may focus on writings by women from Britain, the U.S., any ethnic and/or national group, or a combination of any of the above. The course may focus on one century, a more limited historical period, or span several. Feminist literary and cultural theory may be an added focus. Writers may include: Jane Austen, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Louise Erdrich, Sandra Cisneros, Gloria Anzaldua.

GNDR 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
This course is an internship consisting of supervised work experience in an approved organization or agency that corresponds to their areas of interest. Academic requirements for the internship are coordinated with the internship supervisor. Every semester. INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS The academic internship program at Carroll College is an opportunity for students to apply academic coursework in a real world setting. An academic internship is a supervised work experience and forms an academic relationship between a student, faculty advisor, and cooperating organization. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, faculty internship advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students are required to complete additional registration paperwork for final approval. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours to degree requirements; academic departments will determine the number of credits that may count toward the major. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

GNDR 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

GNDR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

GNDR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

HI 101 - Topics in Global History I

3.00 Cr
This course integrates social, political, and cultural history, acknowledging the important contributions of women and men from all strata of society -including the nobility, religious leaders, rural peasants, urban dwellers, merchants, and others. HI-101 begins with our first human ancestors and ends with the Age of Exploration in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. HI 102 begins with the Atlantic Slave Trade and continues through the present age of globalization.

HI 102 - Topics in Global History II

3.00 Cr
This course integrates social, political, and cultural history, acknowledging the important contributions of women and men from all strata of society -including the nobility, religious leaders, rural peasants, urban dwellers, merchants, and others. HI-101 begins with our first human ancestors and ends with the Age of Exploration in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. HI 102 begins with the Atlantic Slave Trade and continues through the present age of globalization.

HI 121 - HI of United States (ND) I

3.00 Cr
An introductory survey of the American experience from the Age of Exploration to the present, with emphasis on those national traits which continue to influence American attitudes and actions.

HI 122 - HI of the United States II

3.00 Cr
An introductory survey of the American experience from the Age of Exploration to the present, with emphasis on those national traits which continue to influence American attitudes and actions.

HI 203 - Renaissance History

3.00 Cr
This course examines the Renaissance (approximately 1350 to 1620) thematically as we study together this tumultuous time of great art; new ideas; lively mercantile piazze, busy merchants and traders, bloody vendettas; "exotic" foods and material goods from distant places, and the encounters that took place between people in the East and the West. We will consider the religious turmoil of the age, the effects of plague, political upheaval, and warfare on people's daily lives, and take some time to think about love, marriage, family, and sex, coming to understand the Renaissance as a time of ordinary and extraordinary people whose lived experiences shaped the age. Although the focus is on the Italian Renaissance, with the help of William Shakespeare and others, we will explore the spread of the Renaissance beyond Italy, to other parts of Europe, and east across the Mediterranean for a look at the histories that occurred simultaneously with, and were connected to, the world of the western Renaissance. Cross listed with HI 303; students may not get credit for one course if they have taken the other.

HI 204 - Medieval History

3.00 Cr
This semester we will look at Medieval Europe from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (c. 410) to the arrival of the plague in 1348. Against the backdrop of daily life in Medieval Europe, we will consider a broad range of ideas and texts from the philosophy of Boethius to the Letters of St. Catherine of Siena; and from courtly romance to the Crusades. Far more than just the Dark Ages, our consideration of Medieval Europe includes monks on the trail of a murderer, kings and their subjects, and even mythical heroes such as King Arthur and Robin Hood (and of course, Maid Marion).

Fall semester, even-numbered years

HI 205 - Nineteenth-Century Europe

3.00 Cr
This course covers the history of Modern Europe from 1789 to the decade before World War I, organized around political, social, and economic developments and conflicts. As we explore the ways nineteenth-century Europeans grappled with the creation of the modern world, the course will address several specific themes, including the tension between liberty and control in modernizing states, new belief systems (ideologies), migrations, imperialism, reform movements, and cultural developments.

HI 206 - Reformationage of Exploration

3.00 Cr
This is a stacked class, offered at both the 200-level and the 300-level. All students will attend the regular class meetings. Students enrolled in this course at the 300-level will have the additional requirements. HI 206 - Description Two Reformations, one Protestant the other Catholic, a host of explorers, often behaving badly when viewed through our 21st century lens, and the daily life of ordinary people in the early modern age occupy our study this semester. More than just the reforms of Martin Luther and the travails of Christopher Columbus, this course looks critical and analytically, and at times even with great humor, at the people, events, ideas, values, cultures, and perspectives of this turbulent and fascinating time in history. We will consider carefully topics including the body and the spirit, sex and gender, the plight of the poor, and of course witchcraft. . We will venture beyond the confines of Europe in an attempt ascertain what might be learned about both the "discovered" and the "discoverer" from a wide array of travel narratives. We will consider the use of maps as both ideological statements and navigational tools, and we will conduct our own search for the elusive Prester John. Monopods, Atlantic Flying Fish, and a Ninety-Five Theses are sure to remind us that we are not in the Renaissance anymore. Cross listed with HI 304 - students may not get credit for one course if they have taken the other.

HI 214 - 20th Century Europe

3.00 Cr
This course examines Europe's 20th century, starting with Europe at the height of its relative wealth, power, and population in 1900 and continuing through war, trauma, division, and resurgence to the year 2000. We will survey major political, economic, social, and intellectual events and trends from several perspectives including individual experience, culture, and geopolitics, emphasizing the role of ideology. The course includes lectures, discussions, readings, and two papers. Country assignments will help students bring national perspectives to class, and special assignments will help students tie past events to present-day issues and controversies.

HI 230 - Russia From the Tsars to Putin

3.00 Cr
Russia has become a major player once again in the political affairs of the world, generating controversy through its annexation of territory, its intervention in foreign conflicts such as Syria, its resurgent anti-Western nationalism, and its attempts to undermine the integrity of leading Western democracies. Understanding the dramatic sweep of Russia's history helps us to understand the challenges the country faces and poses today. This course will begin with Tsar Alexander II's authoritarian attempts to modernize Russia in the 1860s, explore the Russian Revolution and the resulting coercive utopian project of the Soviet Union, and then study the solutions Russia has embraced to find a post-Communist identity. By reading, analyzing, and discussing texts, you will sharpen your critical reading and analytical skills, your writing skills, and your ability to debate concepts in a group situation. The course will be conducted through lectures, reading, and discussion. Class participation will be a component of the final grade. Crosslisted with HI 320 - students can't take or get credit for one course if they have taken the other.

HI 231 - Montana and the West

3.00 Cr
An introductory survey of Montana's past and its importance in the development of the West, from the period of exploration to the present.

HI 239 - HI of Ancient Mediterranean

3.00 Cr
The history of the Mediterranean is a survey of ancient civilizations around the Mediterranean basin, specifically Greece, Rome and the Near East to the rise of Islam in the seventh century AD. Consideration will also be given to Ancient Egypt and Mediterranean connections to the Silk Road. The course focuses on the cultural interactions and exchanges that took place around the Mediterranean: material, cultural, religious and social; the importance of merchants and trade networks; and the Mediterranean Sea as a space both connected and conflicted.

HI 241 - History Modrn Middle East(GD)

3.00 Cr
For purposes of this class, the modern Middle East is defined as 1914- present, territorially and politically stretching from Egypt to Iran, including Israel/Palestine, the Arabian Peninsula, and Turkey. As time allows, we will consider North Africa as a region with cultural, linguistic, and religious ties to the Middle East but also very different, as well as Afghanistan, and Pakistan. This course carefully considers how history, culture, politics, economics, and geography, as well as all three Abrahamic faiths-Judaism, Christianity, and Islam-shaped the region's past, are inextricably tied to its present, and help us think about what the future might hold. This class also addresses matters of gender, violence, terrorism, and the chances for a lasting peace. Finally, colonialism and imperialism continue to resonate throughout the Middle East, making it necessary to exam the roles of such countries as Britain, France, Russia, and the United States.

HI 242 - An Elusive Peace, Study Abroad

3.00 Cr
An Elusive Peace, Study Abroad in Israel/Palestine and Jordan This study abroad course is designed to introducestudents to the history, culture, politics, and religions of Israel/Palestine and Jordan, a region uniquely shaped by a past and a present that includes three faiths all worshipping the same God, membership in the same linguistic family, and foreign intervention by Romans then crusaders, and finally Europe and the US. Despite these commonalities, and a desire on the part of many who are working daily for peace, this part of the world is also torn by animosities. Offering students an opportunity to see first-hand the region's rich history, vibrant cultures, and passionate attachment to faith and to the land, this program provides a better understanding of the role played by centuries of history in the region's volatile present and its uncertain future.

HI 251 - Introduction to East Asia(GD)

3.00 Cr
This course is a survey of the relatively recent histories of China, Japan, and Korea, from the 19th century to the present. Through readings, lectures, and films, we will chronicle the transformation of these three East Asian countries from quasi-medieval dynasties to subordinate semi-colonies of the Western powers in the 19th century, to the revolutionary and bloody upheavals of 20th century nationalism and communism that led to human suffering and war on an almost unimaginable scale. Today, Japan is an economic power that still hasn't fully come to terms with its wartime past, Korea is divided between a prosperous South that only recently embraced democracy and a bizarrely anachronistic Communist North, while China is finally emerging from more than a century of turmoil to become a global power that will do much to shape the course of the 21st century. The fascinating stories of how and why all of this occurred will be the subject matter of this course.

HI 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HI 289G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HI 291 - Modern African History (GD)

3.00 Cr
A survey of Sub-Saharan African history from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries with an emphasis on formal colonization, colonialism, decolonization, and post-colonial developments.

HI 303 - Renaissance History(WI)

3.00 Cr
This course examines the Renaissance (approximately 1350 to 1620) thematically as we study together this tumultuous time of great art; new ideas; lively mercantile piazze, busy merchants and traders, bloody vendettas; "exotic" foods and material goods from distant places, and the encounters that took place between people in the East and the West. We will consider the religious turmoil of the age, the effects of plague, political upheaval, and warfare on people's daily lives, and take some time to think about love, marriage, family, and sex, coming to understand the Renaissance as a time of ordinary and extraordinary people whose lived experiences shaped the age. Although the focus is on the Italian Renaissance, with the help of William Shakespeare and others, we will explore the spread of the Renaissance beyond Italy to other parts of Europe, and east across the Mediterranean for a look at the histories that occurred simultaneously with, and were connected to, the world of the western Renaissance. Students enrolled in this course at the 300-level will have the following additional requirements: a research project that is both a written paper and a presentation to the class, in which they will, using appropriate primary and secondary sources, develop a new interpretation of some aspect of the Renaissance. In addition, 300-level students will have one additional text to read, will be required to attend six sessions during which we will discuss the additional reading, progress on the research paper, and peer review drafts of one another's work. HI 303 students will also serve as leaders during regular class discussion. Those without previous a history course, or a 4 or 5 on an AP History exam, are encouraged to enroll in the cross-listed HI 206 course. Students may not get credit for one course if they have taken the other.

HI 304 - ReformationAge of Exploration

3.00 Cr
This is a stacked class, offered at both the 200-level and the 300-level. All students will attend the regular class meetings. Students enrolled in this course at the 300-level will have the additional requirements. HI 304 - Description Two Reformations, one Protestant the other Catholic, a host of explorers, often behaving badly when viewed through our 21st century lens, and the daily life of ordinary people in the early modern age occupy our study this semester. More than just the reforms of Martin Luther and the travails of Christopher Columbus, this course looks critical and analytically, and at times even with great humor, at the people, events, ideas, values, cultures, and perspectives of this turbulent and fascinating time in history. We will consider carefully topics including the body and the spirit, sex and gender, the plight of the poor, and of course witchcraft. . We will venture beyond the confines of Europe in an attempt ascertain what might be learned about both the "discovered" and the "discoverer" from a wide array of travel narratives. We will consider the use of maps as both ideological statements and navigational tools, and we will conduct our own search for the elusive Prester John. Monopods, Atlantic Flying Fish, and a Ninety-Five Theses are sure to remind us that we are not in the Renaissance anymore. Cross listed with HI 206 - students may not get credit for one course if they have taken the other.

HI 305 - Long 19th Cent:Euro 1789-1918

3.00 Cr
An interpretative course which investigates a number of significant themes in the history of nineteenth century Eu-rope. Revolution, liberalism and nationalism, industrialization, the question of class, diplomacy and imperialism are among the subjects to be examined.

HI 309 - Gender History

3.00 Cr
While feminism, masculinity, and gender as fields of study within the discipline of history are relative newcomers, complex and varied interactions among people have existed since our first human ancestors. Beginning with a short introduction to the science of sex and gender we consider the possibility that while there may be two chromosomal sexes, constructs of gender are more complex and nuanced. Throughout the semester we will consider the many ways in which notions of women, men and gender are shaped by a broad range of forces including history, culture, religion, and place, as well as how gender norms and expectations have shaped the world and its peoples. Utilizing a wide variety of sources including scholarly texts, art, literature, social media, and film, we will together consider questions of feminism and masculinity, the body and sexuality, marriage, faith and much more as not only integral to a better understanding of history but also part of conversations currently taking place among people all over the world.

HI 311MM - GenderStudies:Case of Morocco

3.00 Cr
Considering questions of gender in Moroccan society requires situating the topic in the broader historical, religious, social, cultural, political, geographic, and contemporary contexts of which it is a part. While our study focuses largely on Morocco, we will pay considerable attention to the broader Middle East and North Africa given the inextricable ties that bind this region, as well as the forces that drive them apart. It will consider gender in the pre-Islamic MENA region, as well as the changes introduced by Islam as they pertain to sex roles, male-female dynamics, and the degree to which male ideology has dominated social practices. We will examine both the Qur'an and Islamic law (Shari'a) for clues regarding questions of gender, as well as look at deeply rooted (but also changing) cultural notions of gender. As early as the19th century Moroccan women, like women in other parts of the region (i.e. Huda Sha'arwi and the feminist movement in Egypt), gained greater awareness of questions of women's rights and feminism. Critical examination of these topics requires an equally critical look at questions of men and masculinity, although the latter is much more recent as a field of study, as well as how relations between men and women continue to change. Beginning with the more general themes of history, culture, and religion, the course will then move to more recent matters. The Moudawana or Personal Status Code (viewed by many as inherently discriminatory); the upheavals of the early 21st century; questions of politics and power; and the on-going reverberations in the wake of the Arab spring are just a few of the topics that will occupy our time and discussion. From dress, relations between men and women, the family, and the larger questions of history, religion, and culture this course engages both students and professor in a conversation that is taking place not only here in Morocco but across the Middle East and North Africa.

HI 312 - History of Ireland

3.00 Cr
Brian Boru, St. Patrick, Gerry Adams, Ian Paisley, the Royal Ulster Constabulary, and the Irish Republic Army are all part of the history of this tiny island, some inhabitants descendants of the first arrivals to this land over 9,000 years ago, others immigrants from England centuries later. By 600, those living in Ireland had developed a unique Christian culture alongside of the traditional one of their ancestors. In the seventeenth century English settlers arrived, and despite the passage of time, retained their identity, as well as their Protestant faith. By the end of the first half of the 20th century, both British and Irish lived on an island divided by politics, economics, and religion. In the south rose the independent Republic of Ireland, while the north continued to be a part of Britain. In all, this volatile region of competing identities continues to fascinate and remains, in the words of WB Yeats, "a terrible beauty..."

HI 314 - French Revolutions (WI)

3.00 Cr
French Revolutions, 1789 to present: French History. For centuries, France was the most populous and powerful European state between Russia and the Atlantic Ocean, with a cultural and intellectual impact to match. This course covers topics of importance in French history from the late 18th century to the present, starting with the world-changing Revolution and Napoleon, proceeding to the crises and modernization of the 19th century, and finishing with the disasters and successes of the 20th century and today's challenges of national integration and terrorism. The course will be organized as a set of student research projects combined with common readingss and short lectures.

HI 317 - Interwar Europe:WW1 to Hitler

3.00 Cr
Interwar Europe: From Versailles to Hitler A wide ranging study of Europe between World War I and World War II, 1919-1939. Special emphasis is placed upon political, intellectual, social cultural, economic and military developments during a critical phase of modern European history.

HI 320 - Russia From the Tsars to Putin

3.00 Cr
Russia has become a major player once again in the political affairs of the world, generating controversy through its annexation of territory, its intervention in foreign conflicts such as Syria, its resurgent anti-Western nationalism, and its attempts to influence elections in the leading Western democracies. Understanding the dramatic sweep of Russia's history helps us to understand the challenges the country faces and poses today. This course will begin with Tsar Alexander II's authoritarian attempts to modernize Russia in the 1860s, explore the Russian Revolution and the resulting coercive utopian project of the Soviet Union, and then study the solutions Russia has embraced to find a post-Communist identity. The 300-level students will be expected to develop their research and argumentation skills by writing a research paper that brings new information and interpretations to the class, showing they can evaluate primary source documents. The 300-level students will also be expected to develop their own ideas about historical connections and comparisons. 300-level students will be excused from taking quizzes, but will be expected to attend six discussion sessions and will mentor 200-level discussions. Students not meeting these requirements are encouraged to take the crosslisted course, HI 230 (students can't take or get credit for one course if they have taken the other).

HI 322 - Slavery and the Civil War

3.00 Cr
The Civil War was the gravest crisis the United States has ever faced and remains to this day the deadliest war in American history, having taken over 600,000 American lives. Even now, 150 years since the end of the war, historians still debate the major questions surrounding this compelling period in American history. This course will examine the major political, economic, and social developments that led to the American Civil War, the military, political, and social aspects of the war itself, and the 12-year period of Reconstruction following the war. Major questions to be explored include,was the war inevitable or could it have been avoided? Why did the North win and the South lose-could the result have been different? How exactly should Reconstruction be defined and remembered, and how do its failures and successes continue to shape American life today?

HI 342 - American Diplomatic History

3.00 Cr
An analytical survey of major developments and trends in United States diplomacy from the 1898 to the present. Major issues include American imperialism, the World Wars, Cold War, and War on Terrorism.

HI 352 - American-East Asian Relations

3.00 Cr
This course will explore the four major wars fought by the United States in Asia in the modern era in the larger context of America's changing role in the world as it rose to superpower status: the Philippine-American War, the Pacific War against Japan, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. Examining each of these conflicts will help students appreciate the ways in which both the United States and Asia have changed since the turn of the twentieth century.

HI 382 - World War II

3.00 Cr
World War II was the most destructive conflict in human history. By the time the guns fell silent in 1945, approximately 60 million people had been killed worldwide. What can possibly explain the extent of such bloodshed? While a comprehensive answer may require us to explore some of the most diffi - cult existential questions about what it means to be human, history offers us a clear guide as to why this conflict occurred when it did, the ways in which it unfolded, and how it came to an end. This course will explore the historical origins of World War II in both Europe and the Pacific, the major political and military turning points of the conflict, and issues related to the war's lasting impact, including the Holocaust. We will also seek to balance the stories of some of the more compelling personalities of the war (e.g., Hitler, Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt) with the experience of the millions of everyday soldiers and civilians who endured unspeakable suffering during this most terrible war.

HI 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HI 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

HI 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

HI 494 - Historiography (WI)

3.00 Cr
A formal seminar which surveys theories and literature of history as seen in the work of a variety of historians. Emphasis will be on methodological and topical approaches. Required for all history majors. Recommended for spring semester of the junior year.

HI 495 - Research Seminar in History

3.00 Cr
A formal seminar in which the students research, write, and evaluate major papers based on primary and secondary source materials. This course also serves as a preparatory seminar for students in the history major and related fields who are writing senior theses in history.

HI 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

HNR 150 - Classicl Greek & Roman Thought

3.00 Cr
The Honors Scholars seminar series begins by the examination of the origins of philosophical speculations in the Greek and Roman worlds. Idealism and realism is explored through the dialogues, plays, and epics penned from 500 BC to 500 AD, which provide the basis for Western Thought.

HNR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HNR 250 - JudeoChristian/Medvl Thgt(WI)

3.00 Cr
The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with this overview of the origins and themes held within the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. These origins and themes are then projected through the medieval period, 500 AD - 1500 AD, in treatises and in literature, including Old and Middle English epics and lyric poetry.

HNR 251 - Renaissance Thought

3.00 Cr
The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with this overview of the flowering of the aesthetic sense, the rediscovery of classical thought, and the beginnings of the scientific revolution, via art, literature, and social theory, 1450 AD-1600 AD.

HNR 350 - Restoration & Enlightment Thgt

3.00 Cr
The Honors Scholars seminar series continues by weaving the rise of the scientific revolution with the leading social philosophies of the 17th and 18th centuries, including empiricism, rationalism, and idealism, including the roles of satire, farce, and drama in literature.

HNR 450 - Modern Thought

3.00 Cr
The Honors Scholars seminar series continues with an examination of the romantic period of the early 19th century and extends into more recent theories and discourse revolving around self and society, including social and cultural developments through the 19th and 20th centuries through contemporary literature and science.

HNR 495 - Honors Scholars Prog Capstone

2.00 Cr
The themes of the Honors Scholars Program have been knowledge, charity, and the humanities: over the last five semesters, you have explored the interrelations among these three concepts by way of a careful examination of the Great Books. Now it is time for you engage two of these texts in a conversation about one the program's central questions. Over the next 14 weeks, you will propose, develop, and execute an original piece of scholarship aimed at illuminating two texts.

HNR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

HS 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HS 198 - Intro to Health Sciences

3.00 Cr
This course presents a multi-disciplinary look at topics in the health sciences. Students will explore a range of issues that affect health at all levels enhanced by presentations from health professionals from the Helena community. Students who are anticipating careers in health and medical fields, those who are considering graduate health studies, as well as students who want to help improve health and wellness in their communities and beyond will find this an engaging introduction to the field of health sciences.

HS 230 - Introduction to Epidemiology

3.00 Cr
This course covers foundational concepts through study design for epidemiologic investigations of infectious and chronic diseases. Evaluation of screening programs and health services research will also be discussed. Problems presented in class will provide students with the opportunity for gaining skills in descriptive and analytic epidemiology and will include outbreak investigations, the natural history of infectious diseases, validity of clinical tests, and statistical methodology used for differing types of epidemiologic studies.

HS 289G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HS 303 - Public Health Nutrition

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on the main concepts of nutritional health from a public health perspective. Students will learn about health promotion and disease prevention via nutritional issues, as well as community based approaches to nutritional health and disease prevention. This course addresses private and governmental health care providers and food assistance programs; nutritional interventions and response for vulnerable and special populations; the complex links between health, social, and economic factors with regard to nutrition; and best practice delivery of nutritional information and services.

HS 307 - Evidnce Based Rsrch Methd(WI)

3.00 Cr
HS 307 is an introduction to and exploration of processes, including the use of citation databases, evaluation of the literature, and data analyses. Students will learn the differences between primary, secondary, and tertiary research through the writing process and how research leads to evidence-based practice in clinical and public health settings. Junior or Senior Standing.

HS 325 - Applied Anatomical Kinesiology

3.00 Cr
Course includes the study of the anatomical locations, insertions, and actions of the major skeletal muscles, the structure and function of the major joints of the body, and a review of the skeleton. It will emphasize basic myology and osteology and their relationship to the science of body movement.

HS 329 - Public Health & Environment

3.00 Cr
This course provides students with an introduction to and overview of the key areas and principles of environmental health. Students will gain an understanding of 1) the interaction between individuals, communities, and the environment, 2) the impacts of various environmental contaminants on public health, and 3) specific applications of environmental engineering to improve environmental and human health. Topics to be covered include environmental policy and regulation, environmental cleanup and remediation processes, and standards for water quality, air quality, food safety and waste disposal.

HS 335G - Health Policy Mgmt/Issues(GD)

3.00 Cr
This course addresses key topics in global and national health. Students will gain additional awareness of the biological and social aspects of major global health issues and diseases. General areas of emphasis are chronic and infectious diseases, nutrition, and environmental health. Within these areas populations at risk, health policies, and programs designed to reduce health inequalities will be analyzed. Students will also become proficient in public/global health vocabulary, basic methods used to assess global health, and explore resources for further understanding emerging health issues. Prerequisite: MA 207 and HS 230. Fall and spring semester. Fulfills National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

HS 335N - Health Policy Mgmt/Issues(ND)

3.00 Cr
This course addresses key topics in global and national health. Students will gain additional awareness of the biological and social aspects of major global health issues and diseases. General areas of emphasis are chronic and infectious diseases, nutrition, and environmental health. Within these areas populations at risk, health policies, and programs designed to reduce health inequalities will be analyzed. Students will also become proficient in public/global health vocabulary, basic methods used to assess global health, and explore resources for further understanding emerging health issues. Prerequisite: MA 207 and HS 230. Fall and spring semester. Fulfills National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

HS 405 - Senior Seminar (WI)

1.00 Cr
The purpose of this seminar is to provide senior level public health and health sciences majors information that will assist them in preparing for professional life. Students planning to attend graduate school should take this course during fall semester.

HS 413 - Exercise Physiology/Human Perf

3.00 Cr
The study of basic physiological functions of the body and their response to exercise. Topics include muscle structure and function, responses and adaptations to exercise, energy metabolism, effects of exercise and training on body composition, aerobic and anaerobic fitness, and nutrition and other aids to performance.

HS 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Health Sciences or Public Health students will complete an internship in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend 3-18 hours per week in their internship site. For more information, please see program web page. Planning for internships must occur during the semester prior to participating in an internship. Junior or Senior Standing.

HS 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

HS 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

HS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

ILC 289H - The Elusive Self

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both Psychology and Philosophy.

The Elusive Self: On Mind, Brain, & Consciousness.

ILC 289J - Philosophy & Poetry

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning Course for which students receive CORE credit in both literature and philosophy.

ILC 289K - Depression, Trauma, & Lit

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning Course for which students receive CORE credit in both literature and social sciences (psychology). How do we diagnose a mental illness? How are symptoms of mental illness portrayed in literature? Depression, Trauma and Madness (ILC289-K) will examine the ways in which psychology and literature both overlap and diverge on the subject of mental illness. The course will consist of a conversation between literary texts that portray mental illnesses and psychologists' current understanding of those illnesses. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting current diagnostics for many common psychological disorders and how certain disorders are reflected in literature. The course will have distinct units with specific texts used to highlight important aspects of depression, trauma and madness.

ILC 289L - Terroir et Patrimoine(GD)

4.00 Cr
La France: Terroir et Patrimoine(GD)

ILC 289M - Chemistry & Culture of Cuisine

4.00 Cr
This course will provide a basic understanding of the cultural and chemical makeup of food in France. The course is appropriate for students not majoring in science or French, but students in those disciplines are welcome. There is no assumption of any previous high school chemistry, but knowledge of high school algebra will be helpful. The course will satisfy both the science/lab requirement and global diversity requirement within the current core curriculum. The laboratory portion of the course will reinforce the lecture topics, as well as provide valuable hands-on experience with how science is performed. All laboratory exercises will take place in a common kitchen and in the kitchens of the students' rented apartments. Laboratory activities will involve investigating basic chemical concepts through the experimentation with foods and the preparation of French dishes.

ILC 389C - World Cinema (GD)

4.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to the aesthetics and the politics of world cinema within multiple cinematic traditions (e.g. Neo-Realism, Third Cinema, Indigenous Media, etc.), which have focused on social justice and human rights issues in the world. We will examine the intersections between the global and the local, between history and memory, and between the self and the "other" in African, Asian, European, and Latin and North American cinemas. The course will foster integrative learning by providing students with the tools and critical lenses that are grounded in both humanities and social science epistemologies. The humanities framework will guide students to consider questions about the politics and aesthetics of representation, the relationship between history and memory, between the self and the other, and cinema as a medium of knowledge-production in comparative global and local contexts. The social science framework will encourage students to critically examine the multiple aspects of production, distribution, and consumption of cinematic texts and its effects on meaning-making. Students will be required to apply this interdisciplinary approach to the creation of their own film texts on social justice and human rights themes in the local context.

ILC 389D - Atrocity, Suffering & God

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both History and Theology.

This course will seek to weave together the problem and question of God with historical case studies illuminating humanity's capacity for cruelty, atrocity, and genocide. By exploring some of the leading philosophical and theological arguments regarding the problem of evil, for example, alongside real historical examples, we will force the class to confront the reality that neither discipline has all the answers to the difficult questions posed by the human potential for evil.

ILC 389E - Holocaust: Psych & History

4.00 Cr
The destruction of European Jewry is among the most heinous crimes of Nazi Germany. The Holocaust seems almost inconceivable; yet, close study shows it as a set of comprehensible human interactions. This course integrates psychological perspectives into the study of the historical event. Misconstrued psychological concepts (e.g., personality and racial differences) informed German policies under Hitler. Psychological scholars immigrated to the United States as the Nazi party gained power, and fields of psychological inquiry developed after World War II to better understand what had occurred (e.g., obedience to authority, racism). This ILC will explore the motivations and actions of those involved while familiarizing the students with the origins and operation of this genocide.

ILC 389F - Exploring Gender Lit & History

4.00 Cr
Exploring Gender, Literature, and History.

ILC 389G - Atrocity, Suffering & God

4.00 Cr
An Integrative Learning course where students receive CORE credit in both History and Philosophy. This course will seek to weave together the problem and question of God with historical case studies illuminating humanity's capacity for cruelty, atrocity, and genocide. By exploring some of the leading philosophical and theological arguments regarding the problem of evil, for example, alongside real historical examples, we will force the class to confront the reality that neither discipline has all the answers to the difficult questions posed by the human potential for evil.

IR 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

IR 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

IR 312MM - Geostrategic Importance Morocc

3.00 Cr
The Geostrategic Importance of Morocco in International Relations and Alliance-Building. This course examines the political and economic effects of the modern and contemporary Morocco. Specific analysis is placed on the role of the country in regional and international affairs, along with a geographical and historical background, relating to colonization and globalization, which has participated in this accomplishment. The course, therefore, provides an assessment of the challenges and the achievements of Morocco as part of the international community since the beginning of the 20th century.

Essamati, Iman |

3.00 Cr
Irreconcilable Differences? The Representation of Geopolitical Conflict In Western &

IR 332MM - Peace & Conflict Resolution

3.00 Cr
The course seeks to provide an overview of the theories, principles and tools used in the field of peace and conflict resolution. Students will acquire an understanding of the nature, dynamics, and intractability aspects of contemporary world conflicts and develop skills necessary to confront the challenges of conflict and peace building situations across cultures. This will be accomplished through role play and simulation, various negotiating techniques and strategies to deal with, manage, and attempt to resolve some of the most intractable conflicts of our time.

IR 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

IR 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Students participate as interns at relevant organizations and agencies arranged in consultation with the director of Carroll's International Relations program. Only 6 internship credits may be applied to the International Relations major.

IR 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

IR 495 - Senior Seminar (WI)

3.00 Cr
A capstone seminar in which students demonstrate broad and deep understanding of their major and mastery of research methods by writing original research papers. Students write on complex topics and collaborate with peers and faculty to improve their work and make a novel contribution to scholarship. Required for PO/IR majors.

IR 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

LA 101 - Introductory Latin (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to give students an introduction to Latin and some experience translating Latin authors. Latin grammar is presented in a way that is understandable to students and at the same time preserves what is best in the long tradition of classical scholarship. Class material reflects Roman thought, history, philosophy, and includes the most famous quotations and excerpts of the best Latin writers and thinkers.

LA 102 - Introductory Latin (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to give students an introduction to Latin and some experience translating Latin authors. Latin grammar is presented in a way that is understandable to students and at the same time preserves what is best in the long tradition of classical scholarship. Class material reflects Roman thought, history, philosophy, and includes the most famous quotations and excerpts of the best Latin writers and thinkers.

LA 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

LA 203 - Intermediate Latin (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course builds on the fundamentals of the introductory class and develops proficiency in translating and understanding Latin and classical culture. Selected authors include Cicero, Horace, Pliny, Nepos, Livy, Vergil, Catullus, Martial, et al.

LA 204 - Intermediate Latin (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course builds on the fundamentals of the introductory class and develops proficiency in translating and understanding Latin and classical culture. Selected authors include Cicero, Horace, Pliny, Nepos, Livy, Vergil, Catullus, Martial, et al.

LA 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

LAS 105 - College Success

1.00 Cr
This course is designed to give students practical tips and strategies to help them succeed in college. The focus of this class is on personal responsibility, learning styles, organization techniques, effective studying methods, time management and use of college resources.

LAS 185 - Career Exploration Fr/So Stdnt

1.00 Cr
This course helps students who are unclear about their educational goals and future career plans to identify their career related interests and values and to develop their personal decision-making style. With a better understanding of self and a vision for one's personal future, students will learn how to pursue their career-related interests and apply them to the reality of the changing job market of the 21st century.

LAS 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

LAS 201 - Outdoor Emergency Care

4.00 Cr
Outdoor Emergency Care (OEC) was developd under the guidance of the National Ski Patrol (NSP) to train individuals to provide initial care to skiers who became injured while skiing. The program has since expanded to include not only training for ski patrollers, but for those who wish to provide emergency care to injured persons in a variety of outdoor conditions and recreational activities.

LAS 202 - Ski Patrol-Fees Apply

2.00 Cr
Riders and skiers often become injured in the outdoors and need medical intervention, rescue, and transport for survival. In this course, students who already become certified as Outdoor Emergency Technicians through the National Ski Patrol will learn how to extricate, rescue, and transport injured persons in a winter snow sports environment. Students will learn to ski with a loaded and unloaded toboggan, evacuate chair lifts, and improve ski and boarding skills. This is part two(spring portion) of an annual two-part course with both a fall portion and a spring portion.

LAS 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

LAS 310MM - Exploring Moroccan HI/Cul/Soc

3.00 Cr
Exploring Moroccan History, Culture & Society. Morocco has a very long history and a diverse culture. Its identity has been shaped by so many peoples and civilisations which, beside the native Berbers, date back to the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians, the Romans, Greeks, and the Byzantines. The Arabo-Islamic civilisation in the 8th C.was later challenged and enriched by the indelible marks of European conquest and presence. Like the sweeping majority of world countries and as early as the seventies, Morocco has ridden the tide of globalisation leaving no doubt as to its liberal economic outlook, while making sure to preserve its "authenticity" as a Muslim, Arab-Amazigh country. The result is a hybrid culture that affects nearly every aspect of Moroccan identity and way of life. This melting pot is now visible everywhere. It is not surprising to see in the same area a donkey drawn cart "driving" by fancy glass high buildings. Since the death of Hassan II in 1999, Morocco has been transformed quite substantially; and this is evidenced at different levels, politically, socially, and culturally. This class explores the dynamics of Morocco today as expressed in literature, arts, media, politics, etc.

LAS 320MM - Islamic Civilization

3.00 Cr
Islamic Civilization & Artistic Expression. This course is a broad overview of historical and contemporary cultural context, bridging diverse domains from religion and politics to architecture, music and popular culture. This course aims equally at bringing history and culture to bear upon contemporary global issues that frequently involve the Muslim and Arab World such as universal human rights, peace and conflict, cross cultural communication, and cultural critique. We will examine a myriad of artistic representations from throughout the Islamic World from across the ages in order tt ascertain a deeper interpretation of Islamic Civilizations.

LAS 425 - LAS Internship:

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

LAS 485 - Job Search Boot Camp

1.00 Cr
This course is designed for juniors who want to plan ahead and for seniors ready to launch their professional careers. Students will learn the necessary career management skills to effectively identify and compete for professional career opportunities. Activities covered in the course include principles, methods, and practice in achieving career goals with emphasis on: exploration of career opportunities in one's field, job market trends, identification of strengths, resume development, cover letter composition, mastering behavioral-style interviewing, salary and benefits negotiations, effective networking strategies, budgeting and personal finance issues, professional image, and the use of technology in achieving career goals. Students will also learn how to apply successful job search techniques to the reality of the changing job market of the 21st century.

LAS GD - Global Diversity Course (GD)

3.00 Cr
Placeholder course used in Student Planning. In consultation with your academic advisor, select major/concentration courses based on major requirements and your personal goals.

LAS ND - National Diversity Course(ND)

3.00 Cr
Placeholder course used in Student Planning. In consultation with your academic advisor, select major/concentration courses based on major requirements and your personal goals.

LAS WI - Writing Intensive Course (WI)

3.00 Cr
Placeholder course used in Student Planning. In consultation with your academic advisor, select major/concentration courses based on major requirements and your personal goals.

LL 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

LL 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

LL 400 - Theories/Methods Lrng/Tch Lang

3.00 Cr
Students will study critically the principal and alternative approaches in teaching and learning a second language and the linguistic, learning, and language acquisition theories upon which the approaches are based; discuss the nature of language, the constructive learning process, tacit versus propositional knowledge, the necessary and sufficient conditions for learning language, and education for humanization; and view and analyze videos and beginning language classes.

MA 102 - Foundations of College Math

3.00 Cr
This course presents fundamental math concepts so students can develop the foundational math skills required for subsequent college math courses. Students will utilize in-class instruction and online learning materials.

MA 112 - Precalculus: Function & Graphs

3.00 Cr
A comprehensive study of elementary functions to prepare students for a college course in calculus. Topics include a review of intermediate algebra including the solution of equations and inequalities, and an in-depth look at functions, inverse functions, their graphs, symmetries, asymptotes, intercepts, and transformations. Linear, polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are studied, and graphing calculators are used extensively.

MA 117 - Diff Equations and Lin Algebra

3.00 Cr
Introductory college mathematics course in finite difference equations and linear algebra. Topics include sequences, differences, linear and nonlinear difference equations, systems of difference equations, numerical solutions of linear and nonlinear equations, and analytical techniques for solving linear systems using linear algebra. Applications from many fields are studied and the role of mathematical modeling is a central focus. Formal computer labs are a part of the course each week, with spreadsheets being the primary software employed. This course satisfies a Carroll College Core Curriculum for all students and the mathematics requirement for business majors.

MA 121 - Differential Calculus

3.00 Cr
This is the first of a two-semester, six-credit calculus sequence. We begin the first semester by reviewing functions from several perspectives (symbolic, numeric, and graphic). For most of the course we study differential calculus, emphasizing how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as police radar detection, laying an oil pipeline around a swamp, and understanding motion. Specific topics include limits, continuity, derivatives, the mechanics of finding derivatives, instantaneous rate of change, concavity, the extreme value theorem, and optimization. We use technology extensively, and we also focus on learning how to explain mathematics orally and in writing. The sequence MA 121-MA 122 is considered to be equivalent to MA 131.

MA 122 - Integral Calculus

3.00 Cr
This is the second of a two-semester, six-credit calculus sequence. In this course we study topics in integral calculus, emphasizing how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as fluid pumping and lifting, how rain catchers are used in city drain systems, and how a compound bow fires an arrow. Specific topics include optimization, related rates, antiderivatives, definite integrals, the fundamental theorems of calculus, integration by substitution, integration by parts, applications of integration, and an introduction to differential equations. We use technology extensively, and we also focus on learning how to explain mathematics orally and in writing. The sequence MA 121-MA 122 is considered to be equivalent to MA 131.

MA 131 - Calculus Single Variable Funct

4.00 Cr
This course covers all aspects of single-variable calculus including derivatives, antiderivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. We highlight how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as laying an oil pipeline around a swamp, fluid pumping and lifting, and how rain catchers are used in city drain systems. We use technology extensively, meeting in the computer lab once each week. We also focus on learning how to explain mathematics orally and in writing. This is the same material that is covered in MA 121-122, except this is an accelerated course that does not review precalculus material.

MA 141 - Intro to Mathematical Modeling

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to sequences, difference equations, differential calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra. This is the first course in a two semester, eight credit, sequence in differential equations and linear algebra. Specific topics include analytical and numerical solutions to difference equations and first-order and second-order linear differential equations, separation of variables, the method of undetermined coefficients, phase line analysis, stability of equilibrium, systems of equations, matrix equations, determinants, matrix inverses, Gaussian elimination, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors. There is a heavy emphasis on mathematical modeling and applications. We use technology extensively, and we also focus on learning how to explain mathematics orally and in writing. Prerequisite: High school mathematics through pre-calculus. A basic understanding of differential calculus is strongly recommended.

MA 201 - Math for Elementary Educ I

3.00 Cr
A course primarily for prospective elementary teachers, designed to build a background in number and operations with a particular focus on visual models for whole numbers, fractions, and early algebraic reasoning. The course focuses on both mathematical content and methods for teaching number and operations. There is a particular focus on current curriculum and children's mathematical thinking at the elementary school level.

MA 202 - Math for Elementary Educ II

3.00 Cr
An extension of MA 201 into geometry, measurement, set theory, and statistics. The course focuses on both mathematical content and methods for teaching geometry and statistics. There is a particular focus on visual models and children's mathematical thinking at the elementary school level.

MA 207 - Introduction to Statistics

3.00 Cr
The basic concepts used in statistics such as measures of central tendency, variation, and probability distributions, and statistical inference are stressed. Applications are made in the social, communication, health, biological, and physical sciences. This course does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics, nor does it count toward the math requirement for biology majors.

MA 232 - Differ Equations/Linear Alg I

4.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to difference equations, differential equations, and linear algebra. Specific topics include analytical and numerical solutions to difference equations and first-order linear differential equations, phase line analysis, stability of equilibrium, matrix equations and eigenvalues. We emphasize how this mathematics can be used on many real-world problems such as how to predict the spread of a disease, how a home mortgage works, and how to understand the growth of animal populations. We use computers and calculators extensively, meeting in the computer lab once each week. We also focus on learning how to explain mathematics verbally and in writing.

MA 233 - Multivariable Calculus

4.00 Cr
In this course we study multivariable and vector calculus including vectors, parametric equations, surfaces, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and vector calculus. The big spotlight in this course is using these ideas to understand things like force fields, the flow of water, and magnetic fields. Once a week we meet in the computer lab to use the power of computers to focus on the visual aspects of these concepts to gain insight into more complex situations. We also focus on learning how to explain mathematics verbally and in writing.

MA 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

MA 301 - Teaching Math Content & Methds

3.00 Cr
Teaching Mathematics Content and Methods for Middle Grades This course is intended to build deep conceptual understanding of mathematics as well as the understanding and implementation of teaching methods for 5th - 8th grade mathematics. Specific topics include the teaching and learning of algebraic reasoning, proportional relationships, and functions. There is a particular focus on current middle grades mathematics curriculum and children's mathematical thinking at the middle grades level (5th through 8th grade). This course is intended for either elementary education majors or secondary mathematics education majors.

MA 306 - Real Analysis

3.00 Cr
Why does calculus work? In this course, we study real numbers, sequences, and functions, in order to develop the logical foundations for calculus. What does it mean to say that a function has a particular limit? What does it mean for a function to be continuous? We learn to create the mathematical proofs that make up the logical structure behind the limits, derivatives, infinite series, and integrals of calculus.

MA 314 - Prob & Stats for Engineers

2.00 Cr
This course is a calculus-based introduction to the topics in probability and statistics that are necessary in engineering. Topics to be covered include the normal, binomial, and Poisson distributions, hypothesis tests, and confidence intervals. Particular attention will be given to applications in the sciences and engineering. This course includes an introduction to the R statistics language. Note: this course is identical to the first 10 weeks of MA 315. Students may not receive credit for both MA 314 and MA 315.

MA 315 - Probability and Statistics

3.00 Cr
This course provides a calculus-based introduction to probability and statistics. After a brief introduction to probability, this course will focus on statistics with a strong emphasis on experimental design. Topics to be covered include the normal, binomial, and Poisson distributions, hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, ANOVA, design of experiments, and least squares regression. Particular attention will be given to applications in the sciences and engineering. This course includes an introduction to the R statistics language.

MA 321 - Math in the Mountains

3.00 Cr
Math in the Mountains is an interdisciplinary course in which students engage in a hands-on learning experience using mathematical modeling to understand current major societal issues of local and national interest. The course is run in collaboration with local businesses, research centers, non-profits, and government organizations that provide data so that teams of students can act as consultants throughout the course thus creating strong connections between Carroll College and the greater Helena community, while engaging in a learning and discovery process. This one-semester upper-level course is open to mathematics and non-mathematics majors at the sophomore level and above.

MA 328 - Modern Apps of Discrete Math

3.00 Cr
Modern Applications of Discrete Mathematics. A look at some applications of discrete mathematics that emphasize such unifying themes as mathematical reasoning, proof, algorithmic thinking, modeling, combinatorial analysis, graph theory, and the use of technology. Possible topics include proof techniques, cryptography, primes and factoring, computer passwords, networking problems, shortest paths, scheduling problems, building circuits, and modeling computation.

MA 334 - Diff Equat and Linear Alg II

4.00 Cr
This is the second course (after MA 141) in a two course sequence in differential equations and linear algebra. In this course, we focus on both systems of differential equations, with special attention given to modeling, linearization, and equilibrium analysis; as well as the mathematical language of systems-linear algebra, especially transformations, orthogonality, vector spaces, inner product spaces and the eigenvalue/eigenvector problem. We will motivate the material through applications such as population models, structural, and electrical systems, and linear algebra applications such as 3-D imaging, Markov processes, and Leslie matrices. Technology will again play a major role in this course, as we will have frequent computer demonstrations in class and weekly computer labs to explore the quantitative aspects of these topics. Students will have the opportunity to explore topics beyond the textbook on group projects throughout the semester.

MA 342 - Numerical Methods (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to numerical methods and MATLAB programming. We focus not just on how numerical methods work, but when they are appropriate, where they fail, and how to interpret their results. Specific topics vary by instructor but will be chosen from roundoff and truncation errors, root-finding methods, numerical methods for linear algebra, least squares regression methods, interpolation, numerical integration and differentiation, and numerical algorithms for solving ordinary and partial differential equations. Students will learn to write functions in MATLAB using looping and control statements. This is a writing intensive course and students will complete several coding and writing intensive projects throughout the semester.

MA 366 - Junior Seminar

1.00 Cr
This is a one-credit, pass/fail, seminar-style course. There will be three main segments: select a faculty director for either an honors thesis or a senior project and write a research proposal, write a resume and research job opportunities, and write a graduate school essay and research graduate school opportunities. The overall goal of this course is to prepare students for their senior year and beyond. This course should be taken in the spring of the year before intended graduation (typically in the spring of the junior year).

MA 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

MA 401 - Abstract Algebra & Modern Geom

3.00 Cr
This course covers the traditional topics from abstract algebra, including groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and homomorphic and isomorphic relationships, as well as standard topics from geometry, including axiomatic systems in both Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometrics and transformational geometry with vectors and matrices. The focus for the class is the contemporary applications of the concepts presented, together with the weaving together of geometric and algebraic themes. Linear algebra is the integrating theme.

MA 406 - Complex Analysis

3.00 Cr
This course covers the calculus of functions of a single complex variable. We will follow the traditional development of calculus of a single real variable, but we will discover the beauty that naturally arises when allowing the domains and ranges of functions to be subsets of the complex numbers. The topics covered are: complex numbers, limits, differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions, elementary functions, conformal mapping, contour integrals, Cauchy integral representation, power series, and residues. Attention will be given to theoretical, computational, geometric, and applied problems. As such, students will be expected to prove theorems and to use a variety of tools to solve problems.

MA 421 - Math Optimztn, Apps & Analys

3.00 Cr
This course is a project-based exploration of topics in optimization and simulation. Topics vary by instructor but typically include linear, integer, binary, and nonlinear programming, stochastic processes, some network optimization, and the Analytic Hierarchy Process. We explore the modeling, algorithmic and heuristic solution approaches to, and sensitivity analysis of problems such as the simplex method, scheduling problems, resource allocation problems, the Knapsack problem, Traveling Salesman problem, and ranking problems. Computers and technology will again play an important role as we investigate both the implementation and the theoretical basis of solution techniques. This course will bring together topics from single and multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and probability.

MA 422 - Senior Project

3.00 Cr
In this course, each student will complete an independent research project in mathematics under the direction of a faculty member who will serve as the project director. The student and the project director will work together to select a topic that is of interest to the student, and at the end of the project the student will complete a written report and an illustrated presentation of the work involved.

MA 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

MA 471 - History Seminar in Mathematics

1.00 Cr
This course in the history of mathematics is intended to give students an insight into some of the great masterpieces of mathematics, as seen in their historical contexts. Developing an understanding of the individuals who were the creators of mathematics helps one better appreciate their creations.

MA 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

MA 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

MA 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

MLAS 200 - Gateway Latin Am Studies (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course is an intellectual introduction to regional studies using Latin America as a lens to study the world in which we live and interact. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to the region through geography, history, politics, economics, environmental studies and cultural analysis. Students will also gain an understanding for current socio- political and socio-cultural phenomena that drive international relations within Latin America as well as relations with the United States. We will access information through text, film and online sources. Students will build their skills in critical thinking, as well as thoughtfully articulating their views both verbally and in writing. This course fulfills a global diversity requirement.

MLAS 495 - Capstone Sem Latin Amricn Stud

1.00 Cr
This upper-division course is required for minors in Latin American studies. It is intended to help students: 1) consolidate their work in Latin American studies, 2) reach a higher level of critical perspective regarding Latin American affairs, and 3) complete final research papers concerning Latin American. Prerequisites include the successful completion of MLAS 200, SP 204, and 9 semester credits in residence at Carroll College in MLAS concentration or allied courses, or the instructor?s permission to enroll in the course.

MLAS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

MSL 101 - Introduction to the Army

3.00 Cr
The MSL I course produces a Cadet who accepts the Army as a values-based organization and embraces the scholar-athlete-warrior ethos; who is familiar with individual roles and responsibilities in support of team efforts and problem solving processes in military and non-military situations; who demonstrates oral and written communication skills, understands resilience, and demonstrates a commitment to learning. Live Honorably & Build Trust and Communicate and Interact Effectively. MSL101 introduces Cadets to the Army and the Profession of Arms. Students will examine the Army Profession and what it means to be a professional in the U.S. Army. The overall focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of the Army Leadership Requirements Model while gaining a big picture understanding of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Cadets also learn how resiliency and fitness supports their development as an Army leader. As you become further acquainted with MSL101, you will learn the structure of the ROTC Basic Course program consisting of MSL101, 102, 201, 202, Fall and Spring Leadership Labs, and Basic Camp. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership dimensions, attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student.

MSL 102 - Fnd of Agile & Adaptive Ldrshp

3.00 Cr
MSL102, foundations of Agile and Adaptive Leadership, introduces Cadets to the personal challenges and competencies that are critical for effective leadership. Cadets learn how the personal development of life skills such as critical thinking, time management, goal setting, and communication. Cadets learn the basics of the communications process and the importance for leader's to develop the essential skills to effectively communicate in the Army. Cadets will begin learning the basics of squad level tactics that will be reinforced during a weekly lab facilitated by MSL III Cadets and supervised by Cadre.

MSL 201 - Leadership and Decision Making

3.00 Cr
MSL201 adds depth to the Cadets understanding of the Adaptability Army Learning Area. The outcomes are demonstrated through Critical and Creative Thinking and the ability to apply Troop Leading Procedures (TLP) to apply Innovative Solutions to Problems. The Army Profession is also stressed through leadership forums and a leadership self-assessment. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during Leadership LABs team building exercises, and Field Training Exercises.

MSL 202 - Army Doctrine & Team Devlpmnt

3.00 Cr
MSL202 focuses on Army doctrine and team development. The course begins the journey to understand and demonstrate competencies as they relate to Army doctrine. Army Values, Teamwork, and Warrior Ethos and their relationship to the Law of Land Warfare and philosophy of military service are also stressed. The ability to lead and follow is also covered through Team Building exercises at squad level. Students are then required to apply their knowledge outside the classroom in a hands-on performance-oriented environment during a weekly lab facilitated by MSL III Cadets and supervised by cadre.

MSL 301 - Trng Mgt/Warfighting Functions

3.00 Cr
MSL 301 and 303 (lab) focuses on training management and the warfighting functions. It is an academically challenging course and lab were you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Training Management and how the Army operates through the Warfighting functions. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, preparing, and executing training for a squad conducting small unit tactics. Lab is once per week using peer facilitation and is overseen by MSL IVs and is supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 302 - Unit Operations

3.00 Cr
MSL 302 and 304 (lab) focuses on applied leadership in small unit operations. It is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of direct level leadership and small unit tactics at the platoon level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of a mission. Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation overseen by MSL IVs, supervised by ROTC Cadre. Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for the Cadet Summer Training Advance Camp, which you will attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY.

MSL 303 - Leadership Laboratory LAB

1.00 Cr
MSL 301 and 303 (lab) focuses on training management and the warfighting functions. It is an academically challenging course and lab were you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Training Management and how the Army operates through the Warfighting functions. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, preparing, and executing training for a squad conducting small unit tactics. Lab is once per week using peer facilitation and is overseen by MSL IVs and is supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 304 - Leadership Laboratory LAB

1.00 Cr
MSL 302 and 304 (lab) focuses on applied leadership in small unit operations. It is an academically challenging course where you will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of direct level leadership and small unit tactics at the platoon level. At the conclusion of this course, you will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a platoon in the execution of a mission. Includes a lab per week using peer facilitation overseen by MSL IVs, supervised by ROTC Cadre. Successful completion of this course will help prepare you for the Cadet Summer Training Advance Camp, which you will attend in the summer at Fort Knox, KY.

MSL 315 - Drill and Conditioning 1

1.00 Cr
This course prepares students and cadets for the physical challenge of leading soldiers and familiarizes students with Army physical fitness standards and training. Students participate in physical training to improve muscular strength & endurance, cardio respiratory endurance, core stability, flexibility, and body composition (fat versus lean body mass). Individual progress is measured by assessments throughout the semester.

MSL 316 - Drill and Conditioning 2

1.00 Cr
This course prepares students and cadets for the physical challenge of leading soldiers and familiarizes students with Army physical fitness standards and training. Students participate in physical training to improve muscular strength & endurance, cardio respiratory endurance, core stability, flexibility, and body composition (fat versus lean body mass). Individual progress is measured by assessments throughout the semester.

MSL 401 - The Army Officer

3.00 Cr
MSL 401 and 403(lab) focuses on development of the Army Officer. It is an academically challenging course were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and assess training at the small unit level. You will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. At the conclusion of this course, you will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 402 - Company Grade Leadership

3.00 Cr
MSL 402 and 404(lab) are academically challenging courses were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities required of junior officers pertaining to the Army in Unified Land Operations and Company Grade Officer roles and responsibilities. This course and lab includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and an Oral Practicum as the final exam. The Oral Practicum explores your knowledge of how you will be prepared for the 20 Army Warfighting Challenges (AWFC) covered throughout the ROTC Advanced Course. Successful completion of these courses will assist in preparing you for your BOLC B course and is a mandatory requirement for commissioning. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 403 - Advanced Leadership Practicum

1.00 Cr
MSL 401 and 403(lab) focuses on development of the Army Officer. It is an academically challenging course were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities to plan, resource, and assess training at the small unit level. You will also learn about Army programs that support counseling subordinates and evaluating performance, values and ethics, career planning, and legal responsibilities. At the conclusion of this course, you will be familiar with how to plan, prepare, execute, and continuously assess the conduct of training at the company or field grade officer level. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 404 - Advanced Leadership Practicum

1.00 Cr
MSL 402 and 404(lab) are academically challenging courses were you will develop knowledge, skills, and abilities required of junior officers pertaining to the Army in Unified Land Operations and Company Grade Officer roles and responsibilities. This course and lab includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and an Oral Practicum as the final exam. The Oral Practicum explores your knowledge of how you will be prepared for the 20 Army Warfighting Challenges (AWFC) covered throughout the ROTC Advanced Course. Successful completion of these courses will assist in preparing you for your BOLC B course and is a mandatory requirement for commissioning. Includes a lab per week overseeing MSL III lesson facilitation and supervised by ROTC Cadre.

MSL 415 - Drill and Conditioning 3

1.00 Cr
This course prepares students and cadets for the physical challenge of leading soldiers and familiarizes students with Army physical fitness standards and training. Students participate in physical training to improve muscular strength & endurance, cardio respiratory endurance, core stability, flexibility, and body composition (fat versus lean body mass). Individual progress is measured by assessments throughout the semester.

MSL 416 - Drill and Conditioning 4

1.00 Cr
This course prepares students and cadets for the physical challenge of leading soldiers and familiarizes students with Army physical fitness standards and training. Students participate in physical training to improve muscular strength & endurance, cardio respiratory endurance, core stability, flexibility, and body composition (fat versus lean body mass). Individual progress is measured by assessments throughout the semester.

MSL 485 - Senior Cadet Independent Study

3.00 Cr
Military Science and Leadership 485 (fall) and 486 (spring) are 3 credit courses that consist of experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of varied topics. The class employs discussion, practical exercises, and writing requirements. Discussion sessions, practical exercise times, and the due dates of writing requirements will be coordinated between students and the instructor. MSL 485 and 486 are only offered to MS V cadets in their final year of college.

MSL 486 - Senior Cadet Independent Study

3.00 Cr
Military Science and Leadership 485 (fall) and 486 (spring) are 3 credit courses that consist of experimental offerings of visiting professors, experimental offerings of new courses, or one time offerings of varied topics. The class employs discussion, practical exercises, and writing requirements. Discussion sessions, practical exercise times, and the due dates of writing requirements will be coordinated between students and the instructor. MSL 485 and 486 are only offered to MS V cadets in their final year of college.

MUS 109 - Keyboard Musicianship I

3.00 Cr
Introduction to music reading and keyboard playing. Emphasis on the elements of music through the study of piano technique and performance, repertoire, music theory, harmonization, and transposition. No previous musical background is required.

MUS 129 - Carroll College Choir

1.00 Cr
The ensemble performs a diverse repertoire for SATB choir. Each semester, the choir normally presents one major concert, sings one or two Masses at the Cathedral of St Helena, and performs for special events on and off campus.

MUS 130 - Carroll College Choir

1.00 Cr
The ensemble performs a diverse repertoire for SATB choir. Each semester, the choir normally presents one major concert, sings one or two Masses at the Cathedral of St Helena, and performs for special events on and off campus.

MUS 161 - Music Appreciation

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the fine-art music tradition of Western civilization. Intended to acquaint the listener with the basic repertoire of concert music through a survey of significant compositions and innovations from each major style period. Emphasis on guided listening; concert attendance required. No previous background in music is required.

MUS 165 - American Popular Music

3.00 Cr
An examination of the development and use of all types of music in the United States. Special emphasis on sources of music, music and race, music and technology, and the music industry. Of primary interest is the study of music in relation to its historical and social context. Includes guided listening to recordings and video clips. No previous musical background is required.

MUS 199 - Music Practicum

1.00 Cr
Students can earn credit for participating as musicians in local musical productions, concerts or performing arts organizations (such as the Helena Symphony) under the guidance of qualified music directors. Participation in Carroll College music ensembles is not eligible for Music Practicum credit; see separate listings for those courses. A minimum of thirty (30) hours of participation is required for each hour of credit. Evaluation is conducted by music faculty in consultation with the music director. Pass/Fail grading only. Prerequisite: Interview and/or audition with music faculty. Does not satisfy Fine Arts CORE requirements.

MUS 209 - Keyboard Musicianship II

3.00 Cr
Further development of keyboard skills at the intermediate level, with emphasis on piano repertoire, technique, score analysis, composition and improvisation. Topics include further study of scales and keys, intervals, chords, phrase structure, form, and jazz theory.

MUS 231 - Jazz Band-Audition Only

1.00 Cr
Jazz Band is open to instrumentalists by audition only, and students must register for the course in order to participate. Repertoire includes diverse styles such as swing, blues, Latin, and standards. There is also work with improvisation and jazz theory. Rehearsals are twice per week. The Jazz Band presents one concert each semester and performs for special events on and off campus.

MUS 232 - Jazz Band-Audition Only

1.00 Cr
Jazz Band is open to instrumentalists by audition only, and students must register for the course in order to participate. Repertoire includes diverse styles such as swing, blues, Latin, and standards. There is also work with improvisation and jazz theory. Rehearsals are twice per week. The Jazz Band presents one concert each semester and performs for special events on and off campus.

MUS 235 - String Ensemble

1.00 Cr
Open to String Players: Violin, Viola, Cello and String Bass. The Ensemble will rehearse and perform a variety of music that is appropriate for the college level string ensemble. The String Ensemble presents a concert at the end of each semester and performs for special events on and off campus. Prerequisites: Private or high school orchestra experience of at least 3 years. Permission of instructor required.

MUS 236 - String Ensemble

1.00 Cr
Open to String Players: Violin, Viola, Cello and String Bass. The Ensemble will rehearse and perform a variety of music that is appropriate for the college level string ensemble. The String Ensemble presents a concert at the end of each semester and performs for special events on and off campus. Prerequisites: Private or high school orchestra experience of at least 3 years. Permission of instructor required.

MUS 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

MUS 425 - MUS Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

MUS 475 - Applied Music

1.00 Cr
Private music study on an instrument or voice with a local private teacher approved by the music faculty. Students must have prior music study on the instrument or voice. Students are personally responsible for financial arrangements with the private teacher. Evaluation is conducted by music faculty in consultation with the private teacher at the end of each semester. Pass/Fail grading only. May be repeated each semester. Does not satisfy Fine Arts CORE credit.

MUS 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
The Independent Study form is availble in the Registrar's Office or MyCaroll Document Center. Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

NU 201 - Fundmntls & Health Promotion

4.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is the acquisition of fundamental nursing skills and the application of the nursing process. Emphasis is given to health promotion in individuals throughout the lifespan. Professionalism, standards of practice, ethics, nursing theory, communication, and roles of the nurse will also be highlighted. Nursing skills will be mastered in the laboratory and implemented in the community clinical setting.

NU 202 - Assessment & Health Promotion

4.00 Cr
The purpose of NU 202 is to understand health assessment principles, to apply evidence-_based health promotion, and to acquire techniques for physical examination by th_e professional nurse. Focus is on the development and use of assessment skills as a basis for clinical decision-making, along with proper documentation of assessment findings. There is an additional fee for this course.

NU 208 - Nutrition for Healthcare Prof

3.00 Cr
This course is designed for students of nursing and other health care professions. It covers the major classes of nutrients and their main functions, the role nutrition plays across the lifespan, the relationship between nutrition and disease, and nutritional therapies and health promotion for select diseases. The focus of this course is to critically apply nutritional knowledge to personal, individual, and population health, including diverse and vulnerable people within various health care settings and the community. Students will also examine community, national, and global nutritional issues with an emphasis on social, political, economic, and environmental factors.

NU 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

NU 301 - Care of the Childbearing Famly

4.50 Cr
This course introduces the student to family health nursing theory and nursing practice with emphasis on the childbearing family and well-child. Nursing care of the childbearing family from conception, to pregnancy, through childbirth and the postpartum period, including care of the newborn and pediatric client is presented within the context of a family-centered, developmental approach. The concepts of family structure, functions, values, culture, and spirituality are explored and applied to health promotion interventions for the childbearing family.

NU 302 - Psychosocial Health

4.50 Cr
This course explores selected psychosocial concepts and theories basic to nursing practice. The use of self as a therapeutic agent is emphasized in the promotion of psychosocial health. Students develop strategies of intervention based on the nursing process, nursing theories and research. Clinical experience is provided within a psychiatric treatment facility.

NU 304 - Illness Across the Lifespan I

4.00 Cr
This course is the foundation of medical-surgical nursing practice. Students will utilize the nursing process as the framework for the management of pathophysiological problems in individuals across the lifespan with acute and chronic conditions. Assessment of physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual factors that influence existing or potential health conditions is considered including palliative care and end of life care. This course includes a weekly two-hour and 50 minute laboratory experience where students will apply the nursing process, teaching/learning process, and theoretical knowledge to practice nursing procedures that will be required of them at the 300-level of nursing. Student learning focuses on the mastery of core scientific principles that underlie all skills, thus preparing the student nurse to incorporate current and future technological skills into other nursing responsibilities, and apply skills in the diverse context of health care delivery while still incorporating the art of nursing with the principles of empathy, ethics, and advocacy. Principles of excellent communication, team dynamics, prioritization, quality improvement and safety will be integrated in the nursing simulation experience.

NU 305 - Clinical Nursing Care I

4.00 Cr
This course utilizes the nursing process as students apply their knowledge to adult patients in a variety of acute clinical settings. This course is the clinical experience that accompanies the NU 304: Illness Across the Lifespan I course. It is the study and care of patients with adaptive and maladaptive responses to internal and external stimuli/stressors that interfere with optimal wellness. The concepts of critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making, and priority setting are emphasized utilizing the nursing process as the foundational framework. Collaboration, communication, delegation, and patient teaching are incorporated into the total care of the client/family. Students will also observe and participate in a variety of out-rotation clinical sites to explore the role of the registered nurse in acute settings. Students will also participate in simulation in our advanced simulation nursing laboratory under the supervision of our Clinical Lab Facilitator. These simulations will help students explore the QSEN competencies. There is an additional fee for this course.

NU 307 - Evd-Based Practice Rsrch (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is an exploration of the basic processes of theory, research, database evaluation, and evidence-based practice in nursing. Students will focus on using EBP to provide the highest quality patient care as current and future nurses.

NU 308 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology

3.00 Cr
The study of underlying structural and functional changes in body physiology that result from disease or injury and result in alteration in total body function in individuals across the lifespan. The mechanisms and clinical manifestations associated with various diseases are explained according to body systems. The interrelationships of factors, such as genetics, genomics, physiologic, psychosocial, spiritual, and cultural that contribute to increased morbidity and disease are examined, as well as the integration of the principles of health promotion and disease prevention. Objective and subjective perspectives are studied that take into account the complex interactions among body, mind, and spirit. Basic pharmacological principles are studied to create an understanding of how drugs affect human beings across the lifespan. Application of the nursing process to drug therapy is identified. Specific categories of drugs and their therapeutic effects and potential toxicities are examined in conjunction with disease processes. There is an additional fee for this course.

NU 404 - Illness Across the Lifespan II

4.00 Cr
Utilizes the nursing process as the framework for the management of pathophysiological problems in individuals across the lifespan with acute and chronic conditions. Assessment of physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and spiritual factors that influence existing or potential health conditions is considered including palliative care and end of life care. It includes the exploration of the professional nurse in the teaching and implementing health promotion & disease prevention for acute and chronic illnesses across the lifespan. Principles of excellent communication, team dynamics, quality improvement and safety will be integrated in the nursing simulation experience. The class will be comprised of both online and in-class lectures, as well as a nursing skills and simulation lab.

NU 406 - Nursing Leadership/Management

4.00 Cr
This course explores the relationship between management and leadership processes and practice as well as the issues which impact the delivery of health care. The student will consider and practice the skills needed by nurse managers and leaders to effectively assess, plan, design, staff, coordinate, direct, and evaluate the delivery of safe, quality patient centered health care.

NU 413 - Clinical Nursing Care II

4.00 Cr
This course advances the student learning in the area of medical-surgical nursing and builds upon the clinical experience of NU 305 to provide patient-centered care with an emphasis on the dignity and uniqueness of every person as a holistic being. Utilizing the nursing process to examine the human response to illness and integrate the principles of health promotion and disease prevention, the student will care for clients with complex health conditions in a variety of settings. The concepts of critical thinking, problem solving, decision-making, and priority setting are emphasized utilizing the nursing process as the foundation. Collaboration, communication, delegation, and patient teaching are incorporated into the holistic care of the client and family. The student will integrate the principles of excellent communication, evidence-based practice, quality improvement and safety while providing care as a member of the interdisciplinary team. Students will explore the unique role of the rural nurse while participating in a clinical experience in a rural setting. Students will explore nursing roles in a variety of out-rotation clinical settings that may include surgical nursing, outpatient nursing, rural nursing and correctional nursing. There is an additional fee for this course.

NU 414 - Com &PublicHealth Nursing(ND)

4.00 Cr
The student will apply all previously gained knowledge from course work toward the baccalaureate in nursing to working with individuals, families, and communities and other aggregates. The concept of community health nursing being a blend of nursing and public health science is central to the course. The epidemiological process is introduced as the unifying concept for the wide range of programs and services found in community health. The nursing process is applied in providing services to the community as client. Beginning skills in assessing a community are integrated. Coordination with other disciplines to provide disease prevention, health promotion, and protection interventions is stressed. The impact of the external environment on the health of individuals, families, and aggregates is emphasized. The student examines the role of the nurse as an advocate for health care policy to ensure the health of populations.

NU 417 - Capstone Clinical

3.50 Cr
The Capstone Clinical and Seminar are designed to assist students in the integration of the competencies essential for the practice of professional nursing. During the semester, the student will progress from a structured supervised framework of practice to a general framework of supervision from the faculty and agency preceptors. The clinical site will be dependent upon the student's needs based upon the joint analysis of the student and faculty prior to the placement. There is an additional fee for this course.

NU 427 - Comprehensive Nursing Review

3.50 Cr
This course is intended to assist the student's own preparation for their NCLEX-RN examination and a comprehensive review of the nursing content. Students will be expected to retain accountability and responsibility for their personal NCLEX preparation plan and for the completion of their preparation plan. The course will utilize online computerized resources, information from multiple published written NCLEX review resources, as well as NCLEX review video resources.

NU 484 - Job Search for Nursing Student

1.50 Cr
This course is designed to provide forward-looking juniors and graduating senior Nursing students with the necessary career management skills to effectively identify and compete for professional career opportunities. Activities covered in the course include principles, methods, and practice in achieving career goals with emphasis on: exploration of career opportunities in the nursing field, job market trends, identification of strengths, resume development, cover letter composition, mastering behavioral-style interviewing in an RN environment, effective networking strategies, budgeting and personal finance issues for recent BA graduates, professional image and the use of technology in achieving career goals. Offered at discretion of department.

NU 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

NU 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

NU 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PH 200 - Public Health Field Experience

1.00 Cr
Public Health majors will be assigned a field placement in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend three hours per week per credit in the assigned setting.

PH 289G - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PH 321 - Gardening & Community Health

3.00 Cr
This course combines an exploration of urban and community agriculture with practical, hands-on gardening skills specific to Montana. It will begin with a survey of the food and hunger situation in America and continue with an overview of the historical and current development of urban and community agriculture, with an emphasis on the community and health benefits associated with this model of agriculture. Prerequisite: none The educational goals of this course are that students will 1. Understand problems and impacts of community food and nutrition availability 2. Recognize the impact of local agriculture on community health, individual well-being, and economic development 3. Become familiar with strategies for community agriculture 4. Explore the possibilities and limits of local and urban agriculture 5. Develop a conceptual background of and participate in early spring gardening, harvesting, and season extension techniques for Montana (Zone 4), with a goal of providing food to local organizations before the end of the spring semester.

PH 330G - Public Health Methods(GD)(SL)

3.00 Cr
The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services both globally and nationally. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society. Fall semester. Service Learning course. Fulfills either National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

PH 330N - Public Health Methods(ND)(SL)

3.00 Cr
The course includes the history, evolution, and current status of health programs and services both globally and nationally. It also presents the philosophical perspectives of various health disciplines and the paradigms of health education, health promotion, and community health in contemporary society. Fall semester. Service Learning course. Fulfills either National Diversity or Global Diversity requirement; but cannot be used for both.

PH 333 - Public Hea Theories & Practice

3.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is to expose students to aspects of program planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. The models for program planning, assessing needs, measurement, interventions, community organizing, community building, and allocation of resources will be discussed.

PH 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PH 405 - Senior Seminar (WI)

1.00 Cr
The purpose of this seminar is to provide senior level public health and health sciences majors information that will assist them in preparing for professional life. Students planning to attend graduate school should take this course during fall semester.

PH 410 - Management of Health Prom Prgm

3.00 Cr
This course is the study of methods of managing health promotion programs, including budgeting, performance appraisals, job descriptions, program models, managing employees, marketing and effective meetings.

PH 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Health Sciences or Public Health students will complete an internship in an appropriate setting. During the semester, students will be required to spend 3-18 hours per week in their internship site. For more information, please see program web page. Planning for internships must occur during the semester prior to participating in an internship.

PH 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PHIL 101 - Perspectives in Philosophy

3.00 Cr
An introduction to philosophical thinking and writing with a focus on important philosophers and classical philosophical questions. Course readings are humanities-oriented literature from various historical periods. Though PHIL 101 is open to all students, the content is directed to those who have little or no acquaintance with philosophy.

PHIL 107 - Ethics

3.00 Cr
An introduction to moral theories and an analysis of the moral concepts of goodness, right, and obligation, and the ways in which they operate in society, religion, and law. These concepts will be further enhanced in classroom discussions of contemporary moral issues.

PHIL 113 - Formal Logic

3.00 Cr
The analysis of arguments and the rules which determine valid from fallacious reasoning. Mathematical notation is introduced as a part of course content. Subject matter is particularly useful to students majoring in computer science and political science (pre-law interests).

PHIL 114 - Critical Thinking

3.00 Cr
A study of the informal logic of the use of language in everyday contexts. The course emphasizes factors such as ambiguity, generalization, and analogy operating in common argument situations.

PHIL 121 - Philosophy of Human Being

3.00 Cr
An introduction to philosophy through a consideration of what constitutes humanity. The course examines such features as the existence of a soul, the nature of human knowing, and the possibility of human freedom. Subject matter is particularly useful to students in biology, psychology and the social sciences.

PHIL 131 - Philosophy & Film

3.00 Cr
An introduction to philosophy through feature films. Philosophical issues such as the nature of personal identity, question of fate, the nature of right and wrong, are introduced and films analyzed that illustrate, develop, or even pose philosophical objections to, these issues. Course includes viewing of the films chosen. Course content is directed to those who have little or no acquaintance with philosophy and is a good choice for CORE.

Course will be offered every two years, in the fall semester.

PHIL 150 - Philosophy in Love

3.00 Cr
An exploration of the experience of love in its many facets through classic philosophical texts from ancient to contemporary time. Students will engage fundamental questions about the relationship between love and reason, the notion of the self, the relevance of a virtuous character, the relationship between self-love and sacrifice, the different kinds of love and the role of forgiveness.

PHIL 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PHIL 200 - Ancient Philosophy

3.00 Cr
An examination of the origins of philosophical speculation in Western culture. Special emphasis is given to the writings of Plato and Aristotle, the cultural setting for these writings, and their continued effect on Western civilization. PHIL 200 is the initial course in the History of Philosophy sequence.

PHIL 202 - Medieval Philosophy

3.00 Cr
An examination of philosophical thought from early Christian times through the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Special emphasis is given to the period's neo-Platonic and neo-Aristotelian synthesis. Some acquaintance with Plato and Aristotle's work is advised. PHIL 202 is the second course in the History of Philosophy sequence.

PHIL 203 - Islam: Philosophy/Culture(GD)

3.00 Cr
A survey of the Islamic faith and its expression in a variety of cultures around the world. Because Islam is reality-defining for its adherents, the religion is examined by reviewing its philosophy, theology, history, and social dimension.

PHIL 206 - Environmental Ethics

3.00 Cr
An ethical examination of human responsibilities and obligations to the environment and other species. The course includes a consideration of different environmental perspectives as well as applications to local issues like land use, wilderness protection, and food

PHIL 207 - Business Ethics

3.00 Cr
The ethical investigation of business, business life, and their relationship to the good life. Course content includes an analysis of economic justice, corporate and personal responsibility, employee and consumer rights, and the meaning of work. Case studies give students practice in making rationally defensible moral judgments in accord with sound moral principles.

PHIL 208 - Bioethics

3.00 Cr
An examination of moral issues that arise in medicine and related fields. Course topics include the right to life, forgoing medical treatment, informed consent, confidentiality, medical experimentation, and reproductive control. Case studies give students practice in making rationally defensible moral judgments in accord with sound moral principles.

PHIL 216 - Philosophy of God & Religion

3.00 Cr
An exploration of the philosophical reflection on God and other topics key to religious thinking and practice. Course material includes arguments for and against the existence of God, the relation between theology and philosophy, the problem of evil, and the nature of religious experience. This course would be of special interest to students in theology.

PHIL 223 - Asian Philosophy (GD)

3.00 Cr
An historical overview of the principal philosophies of Eastern cultures, which may include Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, and/or Taoism. Class lectures include an analysis of the philosophical status of Eastern thought.

PHIL 252 - Philosophy&History of Science

3.00 Cr
An exploration of the philosophical aspects of science and its methods. Central to this study is the influence of modern scientific inquiry on other disciplines, society, and religion.

PHIL 255 - Philosophy of Art & Beauty

3.00 Cr
An analysis of concepts used in discussions of art and beauty and the application of this analysis to a variety of art forms. Class discussions develop the student's skills in art criticism and aesthetic recognition.

PHIL 256 - Soc/Political Philosophy (WI)

3.00 Cr
A critical review of theories of political, social, and economic organizationthat have shaped Western social and political thinking in the 19th and 20th centuries. The philosophical underpinnings of "political theory" will be explored through a close examination of historical events and the relationship between theory and practice.

PHIL 261 - Philosophy & Gender

3.00 Cr
An investigation of main concepts and key issues at the heart of gender feminist studies. Particular attention is devoted to the examination of major theories, their specific contribution, their critique, and the broad spectrum of perspectives at stake.

PHIL 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PHIL 304 - Contemporary Philosophy

3.00 Cr
An investigation of recent traditions and problems within philosophy. Class discussion explores the expression of these traditions and problems in contemporary philosophical literature that deals with culture and society. PHIL 304 is the fourth course in the History of Philosophy sequence.

PHIL 310 - Metaphysics

3.00 Cr
A critical consideration of metaphysical thinking and an attempt to speak about the nature of reality, of "being as being," and about the various categories of being.

PHIL 313 - Epistemology

3.00 Cr
Discussion of standard questions in the theory of knowledge. Course content explores such topics as the distinction of knowledge from belief, the sources of knowledge, the justification of knowledge claims, and the nature of evidence and truth.

PHIL 324 - Ethical Theory (WI)

3.00 Cr
An intensive exploration of enduring theoretical issues in ethics such as relative and absolute moral laws, subjective and objective components of moral knowledge, the relation of facts in nature to human values, and the place of reason in ethical decisions.

PHIL 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PHIL 495 - Philosophy Seminar

3.00 Cr
In a seminar setting, a discussion of pre-selected philosophical issues or important texts (seminar topics change from year to year). Required of all philosophy majors and minors, but open to any student who had a previous philosophy course and who has obtained the permission of the Philosophy Department.

PHIL 497 - Senior Paper

1.00 Cr
The senior paper is an original work a student prepares under the guidance of a professor in the Philosophy Department. It must provide evidence of scholarship in any of the major philosophical areas and is approved by the Department Chair.

PHIL 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PHYS 104 - Astronomy

3.00 Cr
An introduction to astronomy for the non-science major. This course satisfies the Core requirement for a lab course in natural sciences. The course begins with an historical development of astronomy and a qualitative account of relevant principles of science. Topics include the tools of astronomy, the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy, cosmology, and life in the universe. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 155 - Robotics/Experimental Physics

3.00 Cr
Learn how to build and control simple robotic devices, and along the way you will learn the fundamentals of logic and control common to all computer programming languages. We will perform numerous discovery exercises in the laboratory, to introduce and practice experimental methods and mathematical modeling useful for physics. This course satisfies the Core requirement for a laboratory course in the natural sciences. Students who have taken PHYS 205 or CS 120 must have instructor approval to enroll in PHYS 155/ENGR 155. Two two-hour laboratories per week.

PHYS 160 - Einstein's Physics

3.00 Cr
Is it possible to travel faster than the speed of light? Could time travel become a reality? Would it be possible to create a teleporter? Do wormholes exist? Is antimatter real? To answer these questions we will explore the key ideas of relativity and quantum mechanics, and the famous experiments that led to the discovery of these ideas. We will study the relative nature of time, wave/particle duality, and the uncertainty principle in detail. This course satisfies the Core requirement for a laboratory course in the natural sciences. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PHYS 201 - Physics I

4.00 Cr
An introductory algebra-based physics course, with emphasis on the principles of physics, for health sciences majors. Topics include classical mechanics, oscillatory (wave) motion, sound, and the behavior of solids and fluids. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 202 - Physics II

4.00 Cr
Physics II: Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Optics, and Modern Physics. A continuation of PHYS 201. Topics include thermal physics, electrical and magnetic phenomena, simple electrical circuits, optics, and quantum physics. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 205 - Physics Using Calculus I

4.00 Cr
An introductory calculus-based physics course for physics, chemistry, and engineering majors. Topics include statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, conservation of energy and momentum (linear and angular), harmonic motion. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 206 - Physics Using Calculus II

4.00 Cr
Physics Using Calculus II: Electricity and Magnetism. A continuation of PHYS 205. Topics include electrostatics and Gauss' Law; electric potential, capacitance, and Kirchhoff's Laws for analysis of simple DC circuits; magnetostatics and Ampre's Law; electromagnetic induction, simple AC circuits, and transformers. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week.

PHYS 305 - Electronics/Circuit Anlys I

4.00 Cr
An introductory survey of the behavior of electrical circuits. Review of current, voltage, and passive circuit elements (resistors, capacitors, and inductors). Kirchhoff's Laws, network theorems, and basic network analysis. General characteristics of amplifiers and electronic instrumentation. Introduction to operational amplifiers and active elements (transistors). Laplace transform analysis of transient (switching) response, and complex phasor analysis of sinusoidal steady-state response. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week, in which students build and test circuits and learn how to use typical circuit simulation software (PSPICE).

PHYS 323 - Optics/Electromagn Radiation

3.00 Cr
A survey of geometrical and physical optics, including the behavior of electromagnetic radiation across the spectrum. Topics include the dual wave/particle nature of radiation, lenses and ray-tracing, analysis of simple optical instruments (microscopes, telescopes), interference and diffraction phenomena, lasers and holography. Two 75-minute periods per week, one of which may be used for laboratory exercises.

PHYS 331 - Computational Physics

3.00 Cr
A study of mathematical techniques and numerical computing methods used to solve problems of interest in physics. Topics include numerical solution of selected ordinary and partial differential equations (e.g., the wave equation, Laplace's equation, Schršdinger's equation), Monte Carlo simulations, and chaotic dynamics. Three hours lecture per week.

PHYS 340 - Classical Mechanics

3.00 Cr
An intermediate course in classical mechanics. General treatment of the motion of particles in two and three dimensions, using Cartesian and polar coordinate systems. Static equilibrium of systems is studied, as is the central-force problem and rigid-body rotation, including the inertia tensor. Introduction to the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of mechanics. Three hours lecture per week.

PHYS 342 - Thermal Physics

3.00 Cr
An introduction to classical thermodynamics and statistical descriptions of many-particle systems. The first five weeks of the course provide an introduction to thermodynamics: definition of the fundamental state variables (temperature, pressure, energy, enthalpy, entropy) and formulation of the three laws of thermodynamics. Subsequent topics include diffusion and the random-walk problem, characterization of statistical ensembles and the meaning of equilibrium, partition functions, free energies, and entropy. The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for classical systems is contrasted with the Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac distributions of quantum-mechanical systems. Three hours lecture per week.

PHYS 345 - Electromagnetism

3.00 Cr
An intermediate course utilizing vector calculus to study electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, both in vacuum and in matter. The relation between electrostatic and magnetostatic fields under relativistic transformations is studied, as are electrodynamics and Maxwell's Equations, and the generation and propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Three hours lecture per week.

PHYS 346 - Quantum Mechanics

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the use of wave functions, and their probabilistic interpretation, to characterize particles. Solutions of Schršdinger's wave equation are studied in one dimension (particle in a box, harmonic oscillator) and three dimensions (hydrogen atom). Operator methods and perturbation techniques are also introduced. Additional topics may include multi-electron atoms and/or an introduction to solid-state physics. Three hours lecture per week.

PHYS 452 - Advanced Physics (WI) Lab

3.00 Cr
A laboratory course intended to introduce the student to the design and operation of apparatus and experiments, technical lab skills such as computer-aided data acquisition, and communication within the discipline of physics. Approximately half of the course will be spent on understanding computer-aided data acquisition, primarily through the use of LabView. The other half of the course will be spent on designing, performing, and interpreting the results of an experiment. The results will be presented in a written and oral format. In order to prepare the student for the written presentation, students will write drafts of various pieces of their final report. Additionally, students will be required to read and report on articles from the American Journal of Physics. Two two-hour laboratories per week.

PHYS 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PHYS 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PO 102 - Intr Comparative Politics(GD)

3.00 Cr
We learn about government and politics outside the United States. We do this by debating big questions and the theories scholars have put forward to answer them, e.g., Why is there so much conflict in the Middle East? Why is democracy failing in Russia? Why are some countries so rich and others so poor? This course is required of all political science majors and minors.

PO 104 - American National Government

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the institutions of American national government. The focus will be on the presidency, congress elections, voting behavior, political parties, and the Constitution. This course is required for all political science majors and minors.

PO 115 - International Relations(GD)

3.00 Cr
An introduction to world politics covering the problems of war and peace, power politics, global economic issues, human rights, diplomacy, and recent crises. A prime objective is to develop students' capacity to critically analyze international behavior. This course is required for all political science majors and minors.

PO 201 - Intro to Legal Profession

1.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to various aspects of the legal profession combined with LSAT preparation. The course features lectures by attorneys, law clerks, and judges, supplemented by films and field trips. PO 201 is recommended for those with sophomore standing, at minimum.

PO 210 - Intro to Constitutional Law

3.00 Cr
This general survey course is an introduction to some of the key Supreme Court decisions in the development of constitutional law in the United States. Through analysis and briefing of cases, students will be able to develop their thinking and writing skills while they learn how constitutional doctrine emerges and changes in areas such as separation of powers, federalism and civil liberties as the ongoing struggle to interpret the meaning of our Constitution continues.

PO 216 - American Political Thought

3.00 Cr
This introductory course surveys the central issues of American political thought from the founding of the Republic to the present. The focus will be on selected critical periods in American history characterized by heightened conflict over America's operative ideals, including revolutionary America and the struggle over the Constitution, the Civil War, Depression and New Deal, and the Vietnam era.

PO 222 - U. S. Foreign Policy

3.00 Cr
An examination of the changing international perspectives, policy instruments, and processes of decision making underlying American foreign policy since 1945. Major objectives of the course include an appreciation of the complexity of interests that shape foreign policy and the development of an analytical capacity to evaluate the ways in which U.S. power has been projected abroad.

PO 242 - State/Nation in World Politics

3.00 Cr
We live in a world of nation-states. But what is a state, what is a nation, and how did these forms of political organization come to dominate the lives of people around the world?r.

PO 243 - Political Economy

3.00 Cr
Politics establishes the conditions for economic development. We study political and economic decisions and rules in order to understand why some people and some parts of the world are so rich, and why others are so poor.

PO 250 - Topics in American Politics

3.00 Cr
An introduction to controversies in American politics. The problems and issues examined will reflect dominant national concerns such as campaign finance, the economy, and social welfare.

PO 260 - Health Politics & Policy (WI)

3.00 Cr
An undergraduate course that focuses on health politics and policy in the United States which will survey the major health programs in the United States, how the Affordable Care Act has changed the provision of health care and insurance, the evolution of health policy in the United States, and contemporary challenges in health care in contemporary America.

PO 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PO 306 - Political Research Methods

3.00 Cr
In this class you will learn skills of political research, including scientific reasoning, data management, and statistical analysis. You will apply your new skills to study data, e.g. from Carroll College exit polls. The skills gained in this class will help you become wary consumers and wise producers of information. The class involves some math but we focus on ideas and tools, not calculations. Required for PO/IR majors as preparation for Senior Seminar.

PO 310 - Topics in Public Policy

3.00 Cr
This course explores substantive policy issues challenging the American electorate. Students will use data to analyze and evaluate the political implications of debates concerning issues such as the boundaries between the government and private sector, social welfare, taxation, the environment, culture, defense, and the political economy. The course will then have students write a policy memo and apply analytic frameworks to a selected substantive policy area.

PO 312 - Elections/Pol Parties/Pub Opin

3.00 Cr
An exploration of U.S. elections, political parties, and public opinion and their contribution to the democratic process. The course will specifically examine the origins of individual political opinions. Students design and run an exit poll on Election Day and apply statistical tools to learn from the data.

PO 315 - Congress and the Presidency

3.00 Cr
An examination of the structure and the powers of the U.S. Senate, House of Representatives, and the Presidency. Attention will be given to exploring the historical evolution of both institutions, changes in the power and function of the two branches, the role of public opinion and elections, and congressional-executive relations.

PO 321 - Citizenship: Global/Local-ND

3.00 Cr
How are the rights and limits of citizenship decided? This class provides students with opportunities to discuss the challenges facing the citizens of the future. We will get out of the classroom to teach and learn from other citizens of Montana.

PO 330 - Topics in Political Theory

3.00 Cr
This upper-division discussion seminar focuses on perennial, basic concepts in political theory, such as justice, democracy, liberty, or community as examined through the writings of selected ancient, modern, and contemporary theorists. The seminar has also been organized thematically (e.g., utopian political thought, green political thought, modernity and postmodernity).

PO 330MM - Islamic Society & Politics

3.00 Cr
This course is a broad overview of historical and contemporary cultural context, bridging diverse domains from religion and politics to architecture, music and popular culture. This course aims equally at bringing history and culture to bear upon contemporary global issues that frequently involve the Muslim and Arab World such as universal human rights, peace and conflict, cross cultural communication, and cultural critique. We will examine a myriad of artistic representations from throughout the Islamic World from across the ages in order tt ascertain a deeper interpretation of Islamic Civilizations.

PO 342 - War and Peace (GD)

3.00 Cr
Presents a critical examination of contending conceptions of international security, the policy making process as it relates to the formulation of national security priorities, and the role of weapons and force in foreign policy. In short, we will examine age-old questions pertaining to war and peace in the contemporary world.

PO 344 - Contemporary Global Issues

3.00 Cr
Contemporary global problems affecting people's identity and dignity, the global marketplace, ecopolitics, and violent conflict will be critically examined. Developing an ability to understand and apply differing perspectives on global issues will be an underlying objective throughout this course.

PO 348 - Intn'l Negotiation Simultn-GD

3.00 Cr
The first part of this course prepares students for participation in an intercollegiate simulation involving negotiations on various international issues by studying how foreign policy is formulated in different countries, reviewing general principles of international relations, analyzing competing negotiation strategies, and researching contemporary issues of global concern. The last part of the course involves student participation in an international negotiation simulation with other collegiate teams via computer networks.

PO 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PO 417 - Legal Internship Program

1.00 Cr
Practical work experience in a professional legal environment. Students keep a daily journal of their experiences and arrange further study and paper requirements with the pre-law advisor. Only 6 internship credits may be applied to the political science major. PO 417 is recommended for students of sophomore standing, at minimum. This course may be taken more than once.

PO 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

PO 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PO 495 - Senior Seminar (WI)

3.00 Cr
A capstone seminar in which students demonstrate broad and deep understanding of their major and mastery of research methods by writing original research papers. Students write on complex topics and collaborate with peers and faculty to improve their work and make a novel contribution to scholarship. Required for PO/IR majors.

PO 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

PSY 105 - General Psychology

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the principles of behavior through an analysis of the explanatory concepts, research methodologies, and contemporary issues in psychology.

PSY 200 - Emotional Intelligence

3.00 Cr
Emotional intelligence refers to the dimension of intelligence that is responsible for our ability to manage ourselves and our relationships with others. Research suggests that the skills involved with high emotional intelligence are primary for career success, and it separates performers from those who do not succeed. This course introduces students to theories of emotional intelligence, exposes them to research supporting the concept, and gives them tools to assess and develop their own emotional intelligence.

PSY 203 - Developmental Psychology

3.00 Cr
This course investigates research and theory concerning the biological, cognitive, and psychosocial development of a person from conception to death. The course covers lifespan development topics, investigating biopsychosocial influences during prenatal development, infancy, early and middle childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, middle, and late adulthood, as well as issues surrounding death, dying, and bereavement.

PSY 222 - History/Systems in Psychology

3.00 Cr
A study of the major influences of philosophy and physiology on the development of modern psychology. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an education in the roots of psychology and an appreciation for the contributions of the great schools of thought.

PSY 227 - Child & Adolescent Psychology

3.00 Cr
This course will highlight the physical, cognitive, and socioemotional changes that occur from conception to adolescence and how nature and nurture impact these developmental changes. Prominent theoretical perspectives such as Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development, Erickson's Theory of Lifespan Development, and Kohlberg's Theory of Moral Development will be discussed to highlight important developmental stages that occur during childhood.

PSY 229 - Educational Psychology

3.00 Cr
A study of the psychological theories and principles that affect teaching and learning in educational environments. The focus of this course is on the theories and methods associated with the process of learning as well as the application of this knowledge in a variety of classroom environments.

PSY 240 - Soc Psy: Soc Affect & Cog(ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on individual affect and cognition in social environments. Individuals' understanding of themselves and others may often rely on these affects and cognitions. Topics will focus on culture, self-esteem, decision making, social affect and cognition, attitudes and persuasion, and attraction and relationships.

PSY 241 - Soc Psy: Social Behavior (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on individual behaviors in social environments. Topics will include conformity and obedience, helping, aggression, prejudice and discrimination, group think, and applications of social psychology to the environment.

PSY 242 - Social Psychology Lab

1.00 Cr
In this course, students will increase their familiarity with the elements of the research process in relation to social psychological topics. Seminal and contemporary research in areas such as conformity, compliance, romantic relationships, and prosocial behavior will be discussed in relationship to the research standards and ethical considerations set by the American Psychological Association. Experiences include forming research ideas; conducting scientific literature searches and reviews; designing observational, survey, and archival studies; analyzing small-scale practice data; preparing professional manuscripts, and enhancing presentation skills. The Social Psychology Lab is optional for students enrolled in Social Psychology (PSY/SO 240/241). However; if you enroll in the Lab, you then must be co-enrolled in Social Psychology (PSY/SO 240 or 241) in the same semester. The Lab can only be taken one time.

PSY 304 - Theories/Prac Counseling Psy

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to introduce students to the theoretical models, research findings, and practical skills and techniques of counseling and psychotherapy.

PSY 305 - Junior Seminar

1.00 Cr
This course meets once per week to discuss issues of importance to those pursuing a career in psychology or related discipline. Topics will include career exploration, preparations for the GRE, APA writing style, graduate studies and schools, thesis projects, internships, and more. Psychology students are required to attend and participate.

PSY 306 - Abnormal Psychology

3.00 Cr
The focus of this course is on defining, explaining, and evaluating human behavior. Specifically, the course will examine diagnoses and treatment for many common psychological disorders. A portion of the course is devoted to case studies and determining instances of maladaptive behavior. The course will provide insight into the various issues involved in developing, diagnosing, and treating a mental health disorder.

PSY 307 - Learning and Behavior

3.00 Cr
Learning is defined as a relatively permanent change in behavior due to past experience. Research on the mechanisms of learning in both human and nonhuman animals has shaped the field of Behaviorism, which emphasizes observable, measurable behavior over internal, mental processes. This course will familiarize students with experimental approaches used to investigate environmental influences on behavior. Classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and observational learning theories will be emphasized. Applications of behavioral approaches to addiction, sexual behavior, animal training, parenting, and education will be explored.

PSY 309 - Research Methods (WI)

4.00 Cr
This course provides training in experimental research methodologies. Emphasis is placed on determining the correct methodology and data-analysis for a variety of research projects. During the course, students will design and complete a psychological research project. This will include, background research, ethics training, recruitment of subjects, designing the study, running participants, and data analysis. It is expected that all students will complete a poster presentation with their group project by the end of the course. In addition, students will also write a scientific research proposal in APA format. The paper will be used to develop skills in scientific writing as well as understanding formatting requirements with APA.

PSY 310 - Human Sexuality

3.00 Cr
This course will examine human sexuality from a biopsychosocial perspective. We will consider the biological, psychological, and social factors that influence sexual behaviors, attitudes, and values. We will gain an understanding of the diversity of sexual behaviors and lifestyles, particularly focusing on human sexuality in the United States. Students will enhance their critical thinking skills through the investigation of scientific evidence for each of the topics covered. Finally, this course requires openness and respect of diverse perspectives to enable students to explore and develop their unique views about human sexuality.

PSY 311 - Theories of Personality

3.00 Cr
Personality psychology is the scientific study of individual differences that predict the way individuals think, feel, and behave. Various contemporary theoretical perspectives (e.g., trait, psychodynamic, cognitive, neuroscience) will be presented to understand how personality is developed, expressed, and measured.

PSY 314 - Cognitive Psychology

3.00 Cr
This course provides an introduction to the study of mental processes and discusses how the cognitive perspective has shaped modern psychology. Both behavioral and neuropsychological approaches to theory will be explored. The course includes such topics as the history of cognition, an introduction to cognitive neuroscience, attention, perception, language processing, memory, decision making, and consciousness. Students will review and replicate classical and contemporary cognitive psychology experiments. Students will also augment their critical thinking skills through the critique of experimental methodology and the application of scientific reasoning to common cognitive problems.

PSY 321 - Forensic Psychology

3.00 Cr
This course provides in-depth exposure to the roles and responsibilities of Mental Health Professionals within the criminal and (to a lesser extent) civil systems of justice in the United States. Additionally, the course will focus on how the legal system shapes the role of the mental health profession in the court arena. Topics covered include but are not limited to the psychology of jury selection; the identification and psychological evaluation of criminal suspects; the psychological factors associated with eyewitness and jury experiences; issues of mental competency and insanity; and the death penalty.

PSY 388 - Undergrad Teaching Assistant

1.00 Cr
This High Impact Practice (HIP) allows students to develop a greater understanding of psychological theories, and build career relevant skills through course aid. An undergraduate teaching assistant (TA) for any psychology course is expected to provide assistance to the professor of the course. Responsibilities of a course TA depend on the professor's need but can include: attending class, grading assignments and tests, taking attendance, providing assistance to students with studying and assignments, and holding review sessions before exams.

PSY 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PSY 414 - Physiological Psychology

4.00 Cr
This course is the first half of a year-long course in biopsychology. The course is concerned with the history of the field; structure and function of neurons, neural communication, neuroanatomy; and research methods. A laboratory section includes films, computer simulations, and sheep brain dissection.

PSY 416 - Brain and Behavior

4.00 Cr
Brain and Behavior evaluates the biological aspects of psychology and behavior. The course focuses on the biological role the brain has on motor control, sleep, the endocrine system, hunger, thirst, reproduction, sexual drives, stress and emotional behavior. Students also examine the biological correlates of mental disorders, such as schizophrenia, PTSD, and substance abuse. The laboratory section includes case studies of neurological disorders and journal article discussions on recent advances in pharmacological approaches and treatments for various disorders.

PSY 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

PSY 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is a unique learning opportunity not offered in the regular curriculum or an existing Carroll course offered to a student in special circumstances. Only junior and senior students may enroll in an independent study. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

PSY 486 - Independent Research in PSY

1.00 Cr
In this High Impact Practice (HIP), students will be further introduced to the research process by engaging in faculty-lead research opportunities. Students may gain experiences with designing studies to test hypotheses; submitting IRB protocols; becoming trained to ethically conduct psychological research with human participants; collecting, entering, and analyzing data; presenting results at local, regional, or international conferences; writing manuscripts; and reviewing and critiquing projects. Each student's research experience will be unique. Students will become involved in projects based on project timing and their own involvement, commitment, and ability. Weekly meetings with the supervising faculty member are required.

PSY 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

PSY 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

SA 250 - Cross-Cultural Immersion (SL)

3.00 Cr
This course provides students an opportunity to experience and understand cross-cultural differences and intersections by engaging in a service placement in a local community organization. Students will serve in their placement a minimum of 45 hours for every credit enrolled, actively participate in group discussion meetings and complete an ISA Service Learning portfolio. In addition to the experience at the host organization, SA 250 will be delivered primarily in a field-experience format with face-to-face and digital interactions and discussion on alternate weeks (i.e., group discussion week 1 and journal entry week 2). The planned individual reflections and submission of weekly logs of hours will be submitted in a digital format. Group Discussions may occur in a face-to-face or digital format. Students' responsibilities at their placement will vary and are dependent upon their relevant experience, language proficiency (when applicable) and academic background.

SA 355 - Study Abroad Direct

1.00 Cr
Recognizing the value of a global experience, and in the spirit of cross-cultural inquiry, Education Abroad offers students the opportunity to interact within the cultural milieu of another country, or countries, through a variety of programs. For a complete list of education abroad opportunities, please see the Education Abroad section of this catalogue.

SA 375 - Study Abroad Affiliate Program

12.00 Cr
Recognizing the value of a global experience, and in the spirit of cross-cultural inquiry, Education Abroad offers students the opportunity to interact within the cultural milieu of another country, or countries, through a variety of programs. For a complete list of education abroad opportunities, please see the Education Abroad section of this catalogue. Coordinated by the Global Education Office, faculty-led programs developed according to academic area of expertise, or through demonstrated significant personal/professional knowledge and experience within the country, or countries, to be visited. Specific academic requirements for credit within faculty-led program generally include pre-program readings and meetings with the faculty director(s) involved, a journal chronicling the experience, and a final academic paper. Individual academic departments offering course credit for Education Abroad experiences will specify additional requirements and protocols. Course may be repeated for credit with approval of departments involved. BA 395, HI 242, An Elusive Peace, Study Abroad to the Middle East (Israel, the Palestinian Territories, and Jordan), summer semester, odd-numbered years and ENGR 395,Spanning the Ages (Europe) fulfill Global Diversity requirement. Students studying on a semester-long program will register for 12 credits in the appropriate course number. For the most up to date information regarding education abroad offerings, please visit St Charles Hall, room 105 or contact us at sackeret@carroll.edu.

SA 385 - Study Abroad ISEP Exchange

12.00 Cr
Recognizing the value of a global experience, and in the spirit of cross-cultural inquiry, Education Abroad offers students the opportunity to interact within the cultural milieu of another country, or countries, through a variety of programs. For a complete list of education abroad opportunities, please see the Education Abroad section of this catalogue. Coordinated by the Global Education Office, faculty-led programs developed according to academic area of expertise, or through demonstrated significant personal/professional knowledge and experience within the country, or countries, to be visited. Specific academic requirements for credit within faculty-led program generally include pre-program readings and meetings with the faculty director(s) involved, a journal chronicling the experience, and a final academic paper. Individual academic departments offering course credit for Education Abroad experiences will specify additional requirements and protocols. Course may be repeated for credit with approval of departments involved. BA 395, HI 242, An Elusive Peace, Study Abroad to the Middle East (Israel, the Palestinian Territories, and Jordan), summer semester, odd-numbered years and ENGR 395,Spanning the Ages (Europe) fulfill Global Diversity requirement. Students studying on a semester-long program will register for 12 credits in the appropriate course number. For the most up to date information regarding education abroad offerings, please visit St Charles Hall, room 105 or contact us at sackeret@carroll.edu.

SA 395 - Study Abroad CC Exchange

1.00 Cr
Recognizing the value of a global experience, and in the spirit of cross-cultural inquiry, Education Abroad offers students the opportunity to interact within the cultural milieu of another country, or countries, through a variety of programs. For a complete list of education abroad opportunities, please see the Education Abroad section of this catalogue. Coordinated by the Global Education Office, faculty-led programs developed according to academic area of expertise, or through demonstrated significant personal/professional knowledge and experience within the country, or countries, to be visited. Specific academic requirements for credit within faculty-led program generally include pre-program readings and meetings with the faculty director(s) involved, a journal chronicling the experience, and a final academic paper. Individual academic departments offering course credit for Education Abroad experiences will specify additional requirements and protocols. Course may be repeated for credit with approval of departments involved. BA 395, HI 242, An Elusive Peace, Study Abroad to the Middle East (Israel, the Palestinian Territories, and Jordan), summer semester, odd-numbered years and ENGR 395,Spanning the Ages (Europe) fulfill Global Diversity requirement. Students studying on a semester-long program will register for 12 credits in the appropriate course number. For the most up to date information regarding education abroad offerings, please visit St Charles Hall, room 105 or contact us at sackeret@carroll.edu.

SA 425 - International Internship

6.00 Cr
This internship provides students an opportunity to experience and understand cross-cultural differences and intersections by engaging in an internship in an international setting. Students will serve in their placement a minimum of 32 hours per week for 8 weeks. In addition to the practical experience at the host organization, interns will be expected to gain knowledge and skills specific to their internship placement, evaluate the experience from a scholarly perspective and reflect upon the cultural experience from an analytical and personal perspective. Their learning will be assessed through written assignments, a syllabus quiz, placement activity plans and evaluations by the site supervisor. Students' responsibilities at their placement will vary and are dependent upon their relevant experience, language proficiency (when applicable) and academic background.

SO 101 - Introduction to Sociology

3.00 Cr
Survey of the basic concepts and methods with an emphasis on sociology as a mode of analysis. Introduces the student to a sociological way of thinking to better understand one's self and others. This study of behavior utilizes materials drawn from contemporary American society.

SO 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

SO 200 - Social Problems (ND)

3.00 Cr
An in-depth examination and discussion of selected American social problems, including poverty, sexism, racism, family violence, and health issues. Recommendations for alleviation of the problems with a social justice viewpoint.

SO 204 - Cultural Anthropology (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course will introduce students to culture as a framework for understanding similarities and differences in behavior and values in human societies. The class will look at communities and cultures from around the globe to give a cross-cultural understanding of human behavior.

SO 208 - The Family (ND)

3.00 Cr
An anthropological and sociological investigation of the marriage and family institutions in various cultures and their influences upon both individuals and social organizations. Analysis of family communications; one?s choices in relationships; parenting; life transitions; and the roles of gender, property, power, and love in marriage and family.

SO 218 - Intro Native Am Studies (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course covers a broad range of prehistoric, historic, and cultural issues pertaining to American Indians. The course will cover diversity among tribes including political organization, social organization, economics, subsistence, and current issues.

SO 220 - Sociology of Sport

3.00 Cr
This course examines sports in American society. It helps the student to understand the reciprocal influences between sports and our culture, including social values, education, socialization, deviance, minority and female athletes, and the mass media and money. Sports is placed within the context of social institutions including the family, politics, economics, religion, etc.

SO 225 - Sociology of Gender

3.00 Cr
While there are biological differences between the sexes, in this course we will explore the social aspects of gender from a sociological perspective. From this view, gender is treated as separate from sex, because gender is the study of differing social expectations for people according to their sex. We will examine how gender is defined, constructed, and reinforced within society, and how all this relates to gender identities and gender inequality. With a critical eye on gender's social construction, we will address issues of gender acquisition and explore the interactions between gender and other socially-constructed categories such as race/ethnicity and class as well as social institutions.

SO 240 - Soc Psy: Soc Affect & Cog(ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on individual affect and cognition in social environments. Individuals' understanding of themselves and others may often rely on these affects and cognitions. Topics will focus on culture, self-esteem, decision making, social affect and cognition, attitudes and persuasion, and attraction and relationships.

SO 241 - Soc Psy: Social Behavior (ND)

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on individual behaviors in social environments. Topics will include conformity and obedience, helping, aggression, prejudice and discrimination, group think, and applications of social psychology to the environment.

SO 242 - Social Psychology Lab

1.00 Cr
In this course, students will increase their familiarity with the elements of the research process in relation to social psychological topics. Seminal and contemporary research in areas such as conformity, compliance, romantic relationships, and prosocial behavior will be discussed in relationship to the research standards and ethical considerations set by the American Psychological Association. Experiences include forming research ideas; conducting scientific literature searches and reviews; designing observational, survey, and archival studies; analyzing small-scale practice data; preparing professional manuscripts, and enhancing presentation skills. The Social Psychology Lab is optional for students enrolled in Social Psychology (PSY/SO 240/241). However; if you enroll in the Lab, you then must be co-enrolled in Social Psychology (PSY/SO 240 or 241) in the same semester. The Lab can only be taken one time.

SO 245 - Physical Anthropology

3.00 Cr
Physical anthropology is the study of the biocultural diversity in humans. The interaction between culture and biology produces a variety of human adaptations that are traced through the following venues: Primate fossil records, primate and human behavior, and human biological variation.

SO 251 - Gender, Health, and Medicine

3.00 Cr
In this course we use the sociological "lens" of gender to look at issues involving men's and women's health issues, illness, and medical care. The medical field traditionally has looked at the male body as the "correct" medical model and the female body as "other." Ironically, this has served both men and women poorly; men, because they die younger than women, and women, because it has led to the medicalization of many normal female body processes such as pregnancy and menopause. During the semester we will focus on gender expectations of men and women and how they affect the medical perspective as well as our perceptions of health.

SO 256 - Gender & Work

3.00 Cr
In this course, we will explore the patterns in work for men and women and the forces that have brought about and affect these patterns. Then we will consider the effects of our gendered labor market-on individuals, families, and society including inequality in the workplace, sexual harassment, promotion, earnings, and work-family conflicts. We will specifically examine the effects of gender power relations on the workplace, and consider the larger consequences of this for society. These issues will be explored through discussion, films, lecture, and activities.

SO 262 - Alchlsm, Drug Abuse, Dependent

3.00 Cr
A holistic approach with a particularly sociological emphasis regarding the use and abuse of alcohol, other psychoactive drugs, and dependency behaviors, e.g. gambling and sexual addiction. Upon completion of the course, students will understand problems of addiction, methods of prevention and control, theories of causation, and the disease concept. They will know various treatment methods.

SO 289MM - Morocco Changes Cultural Ident

3.00 Cr
Morocco: Changes and Cultural Identity The course examines the major social, cultural, intellectual, and human rights transformations in Morocco over the last four decades, stressing the undergoing tensions between the secular liberals and conservatives (especially Islamists) across gender, religion, language, and sexual politics all within a context of democratization. It also explores changing identities and the complexity of Moroccan cultural politics. It is based on a balanced combination of the exploration of major academic scholarship from a comparative new academic outlooks and multi-disciplinary perspectives, along with an insight into the lives and experiences of Moroccans. Above all, it traces the blended trajectories and trends in Moroccan society and culture, stressing the pressuring challenges to Moroccan national identities posed by globalization, attempts at democratization, secularism, conservatism, and fundamentalism. This course is also designed to understand male-female dynamics, sexual politics, youth culture, and ethnicities in literature, philosophy, anthropology, popular culture, politics, religion, human rights, and sociology.

SO 309 - Crime & Criminology (ND)

3.00 Cr
A survey of findings, myths, and perspectives on crime. A wide variety of types of crime are studied, including violent, white collar, sex, corporate, and organized crime. Theories regarding crime and proposed solutions to crime are examined.

SO 312 - Deliquency/Deviant BehaviorND

3.00 Cr
Course emphasizes juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system; includes theories on juvenile delinquency, mental illness, drug abuse, and sexual deviance; and examines the role of institutions and various treatment methods. Strongly recommended for those interested in careers in law, probation, parole, human services, or social work.

SO 314 - Sociology of Law (GD)

3.00 Cr
Examination of social processes involved in enacting legislation, law enforcement, and judicial decisions along with the roles of lawyers, judges, and others in both civil and criminal systems. Recommended for those interested in law, law enforcement, or areas related to the legal system.

SO 317 - Ethnic & Racial Relations(ND)

3.00 Cr
An anthropological and sociological examination of ethnic and racial relations and identities within and between different socio-cultural groups. This includes an analysis of beliefs about ethnicity and race, focusing on their development through historical processes.

SO 318 - North American Archaeology-GD

3.00 Cr
This class will explore major methods and theories archaeologists use to explore North American prehistory from their origins to present. Regional diversity in tribal adaptations and lifeways are explored by using examples from archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology.

SO 325 - Violence Around the World

3.00 Cr
This class will explore the roots of violence including biological, psychological, social and anthropological aspects so that the student can deepen their understanding of the complexities of violence. The class will explore many dimensions of violence including warfare, domestic violence, political violence and religious violence comparing these across cultures around the world. The class will also explore ways to control and prevent various features of violence.

SO 331 - Soc Science Rsrch Methods(WI)

4.00 Cr
An overview of the principles, methods, and practice of research in the social sciences. The course will assist stu-dents in research design, case studies, conducting field research, analyzing and evaluating their research data, conducting needs assessment, program evaluation, and practice effectiveness.

SO 341 - Archaeological Field School

4.00 Cr
The Carroll College Archaeological Field School will introduce students to basic archaeological field methods and research design in one of the most beautiful settings in the western United States. The 4 credit class is designed to train students in the basics of archaeological excavation and survey techniques. The Field School research will be conducted within the Helena National Forest. The area is located in the northern Big Belt Mountains about 20 miles northeast of Helena. Students will be camping and will be expected to participate in camp activities (cooking, camp upkeep, etc). Students should be prepared for full days of digging and/or hiking, sometimes in remote areas. A mobile laboratory will also be set up at the campsite. Thus, in addition to excavation and survey techniques, students will also learn laboratory procedures, including cataloging artifacts and performing basic artifact analysis. Evenings will also include informal lectures and discussions on local prehistory, history, geomorphology and ecology. Students must provide personal camping gear, including sleeping bag, tent, sturdy hiking boots, weather appropriate clothing, water bottle, backpack, sunscreen, insect repellant and field notebook. A lab fee will cover the cost of food and field equipment.

SO 351 - Medical Sociology (ND)

3.00 Cr
Course develops an appreciation of the role of sociology and social sciences in the study of health and medical care. Interactions between patients and medical professionals; function and problems in health care systems; deprofessionalization of doctors, and other problems confronting modern medical care are also analyzed from a sociological perspective. Recommended for those considering a career in public health, health sciences, medicine, health care delivery, or social work.

SO 360 - Environmental Sociology

3.00 Cr
This course will examine the relationships between human society and the natural environment with a particular emphasis on how different social classes, races and genders experience or affect the environment. We will study how factors such as consumption, population growth, development, technology, political ideologies and social movements affect the identification, emergence and resolutions of environmental problems-from local to global levels. By the end of the course students will be able to think critically about the relationships between the social and the natural worlds, and will analyze and begin to suggest solutions to contemporary environmental problems.

SO 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

SO 389MM - Migration and Transnationalism

3.00 Cr
This course explores different issues related to migration in the Moroccan context and enable students to develop a critical perspective of contemporary mobility. In order to engage intellectually with the topic, students will first be introduced to the context of migration in Morocco (including the legal framework of Moroccan migration policy) in addition to the main concepts of the course: mobility, transnationalism, identity, integration, and human rights. Based on contemporary research conducted in Morocco and abroad, the second part of the course will initially address Moroccan migration (by focusing on internal and circular migration and on gender issues); subsequently Ç Westerners' È migration (with a particular focus on lifestyle and family migration); and lastly Sub-Saharan migration (by raising issues related to social perceptions, borders and humans rights). In addition to a conceptual and ethnographical understanding, the course will offer students the possibility to relate to the subjects on a more personal level through practical activities: group discussions, meetings with migrants and activists, documentaries, and a visit to an association that works with immigrants among other activities. Finally, students will have the opportunity to work on, and to present a research project related to migration to/from Morocco.

SO 392 - Modern Social Theory

3.00 Cr
This course introduces students to important theoretical tools that will enable them to see the world as sociologists do and, in the process, assist them in constructing new theories as social contexts continually change. In addition to highlighting the contributions of some of the discipline's founding theorists (e.g., Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Mead), the course will focus on five of the most significant theoretical perspectives in sociology; conflict theory, functionalism, symbolic interactionism, phenomenological sociology and feminist theory.

SO 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
This course is an internship consisting of supervised work experience and an intern observation in approved social service and governmental agencies which render direct service to clients or client systems. Students are placed in agencies which correspond to their major area of study. Agencies include those dealing with the juvenile and criminal justice system, those serving the needy, those engaged in health care delivery, and governmental agencies. Readings will be assigned and periodic individual meetings with each student's sociology advisor will be held. No more than six (6) credits of SO 425 may apply to a student's total major requirements. INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS The academic internship program at Carroll College is an opportunity for students to apply academic coursework in a real world setting. An academic internship is a supervised work experience and forms an academic relationship between a student, faculty advisor, and cooperating organization. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, faculty internship advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students are required to complete additional registration paperwork for final approval. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may apply a maximum of 12 semester hours to degree requirements; academic departments will determine the number of credits that may count toward the major. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator.

SO 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

SO 495 - Senior Seminar (WI)

3.00 Cr
A comprehensive review and professionalization for seniors graduating in sociology, including an analysis of the sociology profession, a survey of literature, and direction in the formulation of a semester project. Satisfies the comprehensive examination requirement.

SO 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. If the thesis credits exceed the credit limit, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

SP 101 - Acquisition Spanish I(GD)(ND)

3.00 Cr
SP 101-102 Acquisition of Spanish I and II. These two classes form a one-year elementary Spanish sequence and are designed to encourage students' development of listening, writing, reading and speaking in Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on communicative performance in the target language through discussion of current events as well as cultural, political, economic and social topics. In this manner, learners will acquire the foundations of language in an authentic communicative context.

SP 102 - Acquisition Spanish II-GD/ND

3.00 Cr
SP 101-102 Acquisition of Spanish I and II. These two classes form a one-year elementary Spanish sequence and are designed to encourage students' development of listening, writing, reading and speaking in Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on communicative performance in the target language through discussion of current events as well as cultural, political, economic and social topics. In this manner, learners will acquire the foundations of language in an authentic communicative context.

SP 150 - Intens Spanish Immersn Abroad

2.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: SP 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with Spanish, SP 250 for students who have successfully completed SP 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish, and SP 350 for students who have successfully completed SP 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the Spanish language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of Spanish both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak Spanish on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

SP 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

SP 203 - Acquisition Spanish III-GD/ND

3.00 Cr
SP 203-204 Acquisition of Spanish III and IV. These two classes form a one-year intermediate Spanish sequence and are designed to continue students' development of language acquisition by listening, writing, reading and speaking in Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on communicative performance in the target language through discussion of current events as well as cultural, political, economic and social topics. Learners will acquire the structural foundations of language through an authentic communicative context.

SP 204 - Acquisition Spanish IV-GD/ND

3.00 Cr
SP 203-204 Acquisition of Spanish III and IV. These two classes form a one-year intermediate Spanish sequence and are designed to continue students' development of language acquisition by listening, writing, reading and speaking in Spanish. Emphasis will be placed on communicative performance in the target language through discussion of current events as well as cultural, political, economic and social topics. Learners will acquire the structural foundations of language through an authentic communicative context.

SP 250 - Intens Spanish Immersn Abroad

2.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: SP 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with Spanish, SP 250 for students who have successfully completed SP 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish, and SP 350 for students who have successfully completed SP 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the Spanish language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of Spanish both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak Spanish on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

SP 301 - Spanish Convers (GD)(ND) I

3.00 Cr
This class provides students with opportunities to develop their speaking performance and presentation skills expected in advanced courses. The class acts as a bridge between lower division and upper-division Spanish courses. It improves student's spoken facility with Spanish through listening, reading, and extensive, open and authentic dialogue. The course also introduces students to idiomatic words, phrases, and expressions used in the Spanish world. This course is conducted in Spanish.

SP 303 - Spanish & Lat Am Civ/Cul (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course serves as a bridge between the Acquisition of Spanish courses (I-IV) and upper-division Spanish courses. This course is an introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world of the Iberian Peninsula and the Americas. Students learn about the key events and the fundamental ideas and themes running through the cultures of Spain and Latin America across the centuries as well as introductory literary selections representative of the different periods. Class discussions focus on processes of conquest and colonialism, nation formation, modernization, and on the changing roles of religion, race and gender. Through discussions, presentations, written response papers and exams, students learn to critically read and understand Spanish-speaking cultures, and to develop original arguments.

SP 305 - Spanish & Latin Am Lit (GD)

3.00 Cr
This course provides an introduction to Spanish-language literature and to the analysis of cultural texts. During the semester, students will learn how to read both critically and creatively, analyzing the strategies that different authors use to express their ideas, create their literary worlds, and engage the reader. The course will focus on interpretation in both oral and written form. The analytical approach presented in this course will prepare students for more advanced classes in literature and culture. The course aims, then, to expose students to a wide range of Spanish-language texts and encourage learners to create more critical, insightful and engaging readings of texts.

SP 306 - Adv Spanish Gram & Comp (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to strengthen students' comprehension and application of the most challenging grammatical structures for second language learners within a meaningful written language context. This objective will be accomplished through a thorough review and practice of problematic grammatical structures, and the application of these structures in writing and discussion sessions. Students will learn to write creatively as well as in both expository and argumentative formats. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

SP 320 - Spanish for the Professions

3.00 Cr
This course is conducted in Spanish and is designed for students who have a particular interest in using Spanish in a workplace environment. The selected topic will give students a foundation in the vocabulary of either business, public service or the health professions. The course will aid in the expression of basic concepts in Spanish along with expressions of non-verbal communication and cultural norms. It will cover specific career/vocation-oriented information related to the field in Spanish. Additionally, the course will address the importance of cultural awareness and sensitivity in the context of international discourse. This course is conducted in Spanish. Offered at the discretion of the department.

SP 350 - Intens Spanish Immersn Abroad

3.00 Cr
This program consists of three levels of proficiency: SP 150 for students with no prior knowledge or experience with Spanish, SP 250 for students who have successfully completed SP 102 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish, and SP 350 for students who have successfully completed SP 204 or have the equivalent knowledge or experience with Spanish. The program offers the student the opportunity to become immersed in the Spanish language while experiencing the cultural and societal conditions of the country where the program takes place. The methods used in this program are intended to foster the acquisition of Spanish both in and out of the classroom. The acquisition will take place through students' and teachers' active interaction with the language and daily life in the host country. Students will read, write, and speak Spanish on a daily basis and will be required to analyze social, political, and cultural aspects of their surroundings. Through this process, students also will have the opportunity to develop new perspectives with regard to peoples of other cultures and a point of comparison upon which to base questions of human existence.

SP 401 - Topics in Spanish Cult/Lit-GD

3.00 Cr
This course provides a topical study of peninsular texts written in the Spanish-language tradition. According to the chosen topic, the course will cover historical and cultural elements of nation formation and imperialism, religious influences of Catholicism and Islam, the rise and fall of chivalry, modern literary movements such as romanticism, realism, naturalism, the Generation of '98, the Generation of '27, the Avant-garde, Civil War and Francoism, post-modernism and contemporary narrative. The course will focus on developing techniques for analytical reading and for argumentative writing in Spanish. It will also give students opportunities to practice and improve textual interpretation in both oral and written form.

SP 403 - Latin Am Lit & Culture I (GD)

3.00 Cr
This class will introduce readings of poetry, prose narrative, essay, and drama depending on a selected topic, exploring literature in relation to its historical and cultural contexts. The course will focus on developing techniques for analytical reading and for argumentative writing in Spanish. It will also give students opportunities to practice and improve textual interpretation in both oral and written form.

SP 410G - Topics: Span/Latin Am Film GD

3.00 Cr
Students will view various Spanish and Latin American films produced during the second half of the 20th Century and the beginning of the 21st Century and considering these cultural productions in conjunction with readings on current events affecting the Hispanic World concerning social issues, artistic and aesthetic production and theoretical considerations of filmmaking. During classroom activities and discussions, students will analyze texts and films in terms of their subject matter, cinematic and technical style, historical and contemporary resonance, critical and popular reception, the filmmakers' background and vision, and secondary critical sources. Students will engage with the presented material through class discussion, oral presentations as well as producing a final analytical paper in Spanish. This course is taught in Spanish.

Fulfills Global or National Diversity requirement depending on topic.

Taught Fall, Even.

Prerequisites: SP 303, SP 305 and SP 306 or permission of the instructor.

SP 415 - Spanish Lab Coordinator

1.00 Cr
Students who enrolled in this course must have a high-intermediate level of speaking proficiency in Spanish or by consent of the Spanish lab faculty supervisor. By participating as a lab coordinator for first- and/or second-semester Spanish classes, students conducting these labs will earn up to one credit per semester, with a maximum of two credits per academic year. Labs will meet every week for 50 minutes throughout the semester. The lab coordinator will function as a mediator in the group to promote language acquisition in order to facilitate and help improve the oral production and communication of the students.

SP 425 - Spanish Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

SP 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
The Independent Study form is available in the Registrar's Office or MyCaroll Document Center. Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

SP 491 - Spanish Capstone

1.00 Cr
Students will work with their major advisor on a final project. These projects may include an internship, writing or performance of a dramatic work, or a written research paper with approval from the student's advisor. The final project will be presented to a public audience in a formal or informal setting. The student will work with the Spanish Program faculty to organize, prepare and present their project. This course is offered as needed at the discretion of the department and should be taken during the final semester of a student's senior year. This course is required for graduation from the Spanish Program. 1-3 Credits depending on Project.

SP 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

SPED 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

SPED 300 - Intro to Exceptional Children

3.00 Cr
The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview of special education and the characteristics and needs of children and youth with disabilities. Historical perspectives, legal aspects, the full range of educational exceptionalities, and teaching strategies are surveyed.

SPED 304 - Students High Incidence Disabi

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on the physical, sensory, communication, cognitive, and behavioral characteristics of students with mild/moderate disabilities. Characteristics of learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, emotional disabilities, and communication disorders will be covered with specific emphasis on the impact of these characteristics on learning, curriculum, program development, and needed services and support.

SPED 305 - Students Low Incidence Disabil

3.00 Cr
This course focuses on severe disabilities as manifested in individuals from early childhood through the adult years. Emphasis will be placed on defining disabilities (including etiology), and the diagnosis and provision of services. Attention on school based services, including response to intervention and inclusion will be presented. Multicultural issues will be discussed such as the impact of certain disabilities on families from Native American and other various cultures in Montana. Students will begin to develop skills in instructional methods and materials for students with severe disabilities. Various types of classroom assessments will be studied.

SPED 306 - Collab & Conf Tech Spec Ed

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to develop knowledge, skills and abilities relative to collaboration and teamwork. Provides educators with the information and skills necessary to collaborate and consult with other professionals, families, and support agencies regarding the design and implementation of educational programs for students with and without disabilities.

SPED 323 - Assmnt Special Education

3.00 Cr
The assessment and evaluation of learning and behavior problems of students with learning disabilities, mental retardation, and emotional disturbance/behavior disorders at the preschool through secondary levels. Emphases are on students' use and evaluation of current assessments in special education and their use in the development of individualized educational programs.

SPED 324 - Diagnostic-Based Interventions

3.00 Cr
Diagnostic-Based Interventions in Literacy Instruction. This course is designed to prepare the classroom teacher to assess children's reading levels and provide instruction for the corrective and remedial reader using appropriate methods. Students are required to complete a clinical experience.

SPED 408 - Methods/Teaching/Lrn Behv Diso

3.00 Cr
Methods for Teaching Students with Learning and Behavior Disorders. Students will develop, implement, and evaluate curricula for students with mild disabilities (learning disabilities, mental retardation, and emotional disturbance/behavior disorders) at the preschool through secondary levels. Individualized education program planning, research-based teaching strategies and materials appropriate for students with mild disabilities are emphasized. A 35 hour practicum experience in a classroom with students with disabilities is required of all students.

SPED 409 - Methods Administering Spec Ed

5.00 Cr
Methods for Administering Special Education.

The purpose of this course is for students to learn how to administer special education within the public school system. Students will learn the special education process from pre-referral through evaluation and implementation of the Individualized Education Plan. Student will learn to write individual present level of academic achievement and functional performance statements and measurable annual goals for an Individual Educational Plan. Students will complete a 90 hour filed experience in the public school.

TH 101 - Theological Foundations

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the study of theology in the Core aspects of theological inquiry-the Bible, the Creed, moral theology- enable students and faculty to jointly explore the nature of Christian faith and the embodiment of Christian faith in concrete historical contexts.

TH 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

TH 201 - Church and Worship

3.00 Cr
An analysis of the Church as a community of believers and a social institution; a study of church liturgy and sacra-ments.

TH 202 - Gospel Accding to Harry Potter

3.00 Cr
Is the wizarding world of Harry Potter incompatible with Christianity as some have suggested? This class will explore how the Harry Potter novels are useful guides to examine and reflect on Christian themes like love, grace, sacrifice, power, evil, sin, community, sacraments, and faith.

TH 206 - Am Cinema/Catholic Imaginatn

3.00 Cr
In this course students will study four American filmmakers (Frank Capra, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese) and how their films express a Catholic imagination formed in their childhood. Not all of these filmmakers retained an active Catholic faith into adulthood. However, students will explore how Catholicism as a culture continues to resonate in their films through ideas such as sac- ramentality, mediation, and communion. Students will also study how these concepts are shaped by the distinguishing cultural expressions of Catholicism brought to America by the Italian and Irish forebears of these filmmakers. By viewing such classic movies as The Searchers, It?s a Wonderful Life, The Godfather, and Taxi Driver students will study how these directors present a distinctly Catholic vision of America.

TH 211 - Comparative Religion(GD)

3.00 Cr
A study of the origins and beliefs of major world religions in historical contexts.

TH 212 - Women Mystics

3.00 Cr
The course explores the development of a theology of mysticism that emerged in the context of neo-platonism and its chief proponent within the Christian context, Pseudo-Dionysius. Following that, the course explores several texts by women mystical writers of the High Middle Ages as one access point to the interconnections that exist between mystical experience and lay piety.

TH 215 - Explore Christian Spirituality

3.00 Cr
What is spirituality? What is Christian spirituality? What is its role in the lives of Christians today? These are just a few of the questions this course will take up. The course explores the various spiritual traditions and practices that have shaped the lives of Christians over the centuries. The first part of the course will seek to define spirituality, both as a lived experience and as an academic field. The second part of the course will engage selections from a variety of classic Christian spiritual sources including Sacred Scripture, St. Augustine, St. Benedict, St. Francis and St. Clare, Julian of Norwich, St. Hildegard of Bingen, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. Theresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross. The final part of the class will examine the ways that Christian spirituality can inform our understanding of contemporary issues; these include sexuality, ecology, interreligious dialogue, and political action. Students will engage texts from a variety of contemporary Christian spiritual writers such as Thomas Merton, Desmond Tutu, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King, Jr., Sr. Simone Campbell, Anne Lamott, and Gustavo Gutierrez. In addition, students will reflect critically on the possibilities and limitations of the various spiritual traditions and practices so that they might be able to determine for themselves the value and role of Christian spirituality in today's world.

TH 216 - Violence & Atonement

3.00 Cr
Atonement, as celebrated weekly during the Eucharistic Mass or other equivalent celebrations, stands as a central doctrine to the Catholic Church and the Christian world. The problem with the doctrine, however, is that it has come to be interpreted almost exclusively through an ill-advised and even heretical model called 'penal substitutionary theory,' This class will not only call into question and overcome penal substitutionary theory, it will posit and evaluate a number of other atonement models that the Church has historically taken seriously. Moreover, it will spend a lot of time both understanding and evaluating one form of atonement in particular, which we can call the 'anti-scapegoat' model, which at least fits the truth-criterion that must lie at the bottom of any model of atonement: that the ground of peace which founds the Church must come in and as peace to us.

TH 217 - ChristianSpirituality&Justice

3.00 Cr
This class explores the much needed yet often ignored relationship between spirituality and justice from the Christian perspective. Students will explore contemporary justice issues that continue to challenge our world today, such as poverty, racism, gender inequality, war and violence, globalization, and ecological degradation. Students will learn how the Christian tradition provides a wealth of spiritual and theological responses to these crises. Students will critically analyze responses to these issues using various understandings of spiritualities of justice found in Sacred Scriptures, patristic writings, Catholic Social Teaching, and various contemporary theological and spiritual texts. Finally, this course is designed to help students learn to develop life-giving, contemporary spiritual practices that help them live just and meaningful lives.

TH 220 - Moral Theology

3.00 Cr
An introduction to moral decision making and moral action in light of biblical principles and changing contexts.

TH 222 - Health Care Ethics

3.00 Cr
In this course, we will examine fundamental ethical theories, the basis of these theories in the Judeo-Christian understanding of the nature of the human person, and the application of these theories to practical matters within medicine and health care. The approach to ethics we pursue in this course will be grounded primarily in a Western philosophical and theological context, and will focus especially on the moral teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

TH 231 - Intro to Old Testament (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course surveys the historical, literary, cultural and theological heritage in ancient Israel from its earliest beginnings to the start of the Christian era. Attention will be paid to the geographical and historical contexts in which the Jewish scriptures arose, their social setting, political contexts and theological message. Special attention will be devoted to developing the skills necessary to interpret the texts within their own historical context as well as the possibilities that emerge from the text as a literary creation. Students will engage the multiple readings that emerged in subsequent Jewish traditions, New Testament texts and Christian traditions (Roman Catholic and Protestant). Students will acquire the skills to critically engage and interpret some of the most influential sections from the Old Testament based on the ancient context as well as appreciate the multivalent interpretations available to the contemporary reader.

TH 236 - Intro to New Testament (WI)

3.00 Cr
An overview of the origins, themes, and continuing relevance of the books of the Christian Scriptures, with an emphasis on the four Gospels.

TH 237 - Intro to New Testament

3.00 Cr
An overview of the origins, themes, and continuing relevance of the books of the Christian Scriptures, with an emphasis on the four Gospels. Does not Fulfill writing intensive requirement.

TH 251 - The God Question

3.00 Cr
This course examines how "the question of God" has taken shape in the history of Christianity and how this question is being asked and re-framed today. Particular attention is given to how the tradition has forged "the God question" in terms of "transcendence"/"immanence" and how since modernity this has come to situate contemporary Christian belief in a new and deeply challenging way. In this context, the course explores contemporary ways of thinking about God that draws out the radicality of faith and its existential imperative to live/engage the God question in the challenges and ambiguities of the postmodern world.

TH 252 - Theology of the Land

3.00 Cr
A study of the relationship of people and the earth, with a focus on issues of land stewardship as understood in the Bible, in the religious traditions of native peoples, and in the U.S. sociopolitical tradition.

TH 254 - Theology and Science

3.00 Cr
This course examines how and why the relation of Theology and Science has taken shape in the history of Christianity, particularly in its becoming problematic since the rise of modernity. This requires a critical reflection upon philosophical positioning of these disciplines, drawing out important differences in "truth and method" while seeking a non-reductive dialogue. Based on these philosophical underpinnings, a theological re-thinking of God ("after Darwin") and of creation will be explored, both in its opportunities and challenges for contemporary Christian faith.

TH 258 - Theology & Gender

3.00 Cr
This course examines how gender-with its pervasive historical-cultural meanings-has given shape to and challenged Christianity. It studies how biblical texts, religious practices and traditions, and theological discourse have been skewed through a "patriarch-ization" of Christianity. It critically examines how becoming androcentric has eclipsed the experience of women and even led to their oppression. Finally the course explores how various forms of feminist theologies attempt to incorporate the experience of women, to retrieve their contributions, and to enrich Christianity with many new and life-giving symbols, forms of thought and ways of living.

TH 263 - Modn Catholic Socl Teach (WI)

3.00 Cr
A study of the cultural, political, and economic spheres of social life in the light of Catholic moral teachings, theologies, and action. Magisterial and scholarly writings from 1891 to the present receive primary emphasis.

TH 264 - Theologies of Liberation(GD)

3.00 Cr
This course first examines the beginnings of Liberation Theology in Latin America and critically considers how this has both challenged and nour - ished the Christian tradition and the fundaments of theology therein. The course will then examine how this has begun to blossom into a rich variety of 'theologies of liberation' in diverse contexts throughout the world. In this context, the course explores new ways of (re)thinking Christianity as fruitfully engaging the world by 'building of the Kingdom of God' in and through the 'option for the poor'.

TH 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

TH 321MM - 3 Religions, 3 Peoples, 1 God

3.00 Cr
This course considers the three major monotheistic religions (Islam, Judaism and Christianity) in terms of their common historical origins, as well as their manifestations in today's world, particularly vis-ˆ-vis contemporary Morocco, a powerful example of a pluralistic, multi-ethnic, multi-religious society.

TH 341 - HCT: Early Church/Patristics

3.00 Cr
A study of major Christian doctrinal developments in their historical contexts, from the New Testament era through the Patristics.

TH 342 - HCT: Middle Ages-Reformation

3.00 Cr
A study of major Christian doctrinal developments in their historical contexts, from the Middle Ages through the Reformation.

TH 352 - Christology

3.00 Cr
An analysis of interpretations of Jesus Christ's humanity and divinity, from biblical statements to contemporary explorations.

TH 353 - Trinity and Christian Life

3.00 Cr
The point of this class will be to explore the complicated but ultimately satisfying and extremely pragmatic doctrine of the Trinity misunderstood by many laity and scholars alike. We will develop a sense of the historical emergence of the doctrine, important and interesting arguments within the doctrine, and some contemporary ecclesial and ethical views.

TH 371 - Discerning Ministry

1.00 Cr
This course will provide students with a chance to reflect on ministry, its point and purpose, some of the challenges they might face in ministry, and whether ultimately the student wants to take on the responsibility of a 3-credit internship with a ministerial or religiously affiliated institutions in our area. The readings and assignments in this class will pertain to basic questions of ministry and vocation, but we will make numerous site-visits to various institutions in the area.

TH 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

TH 424 - Ministering Through Vocation

1.00 Cr
This course will provide the opportunity for pre-professional students to gain credit toward a theology major or minor with an emphasis in ministry. The course will be taken alongside a student's internship, practicum, or clinical as defined by their primary major, adding to that course reflection questions pertaining to theological understandings of vocation and calling.

TH 425 - Internship:

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the internship coordinator at the Career Services Office.

TH 471 - Ministry in Action

2.00 Cr
This course will be offered as a cohort course in conjunction with the Ministerial Internship (TH 425). It will foster both theological reflection on the nature of ministry and practical reflection on issues involved with ministry. In helping to develop this reflection, the structure of the course will consist of spending one day of the course per week dedicated to each type of reflective thinking. More specifically, the theological reflection will draw upon the pertinent, assigned texts, and the practical will use either the students' direct experiences within their internships or the reflection videos produced in internship curriculum. While the course will be taught from a Catholic perspective, all persons of good will are invited to participate, share, and grow in this course.

TH 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

TH 495 - Theology Seminar(WI)

3.00 Cr
A discussion of selected theological themes or important theologians, with contributions by students and faculty. While required of all theology majors and minors in their junior or senior year, it will also be open to other upper-level students who are non-majors upon the consent of the instructor.

TH 496 - Theol Res Paper Or Project

1.00 Cr
Theology majors must develop and present for the Department of Theology a theology honor's thesis or a departmental research paper /project. The student will work with a professor in developing and fulfilling this requirement. The paper or project should provide evidence of scholarship in biblical studies, moral theology, church history, doctrine/systematics, or in another field of study as appropriate and approved by the department chair.

TH 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

THT 110 - Theatre Practicum

1.00 Cr
Students earn one credit by participating in theatre productions as actors, directors, or technical personnel under the guidance of qualified theatre artists or by participating in an conference or workshop related to theatre. A minimum of 30 hours of participation is required for each hour of credit; enrollment and grading will be arranged at the end of each semester by supervising faculty.

THT 111 - Introduction to Acting

3.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to stage acting designed to introduce the beginning actor to foundational vocal, physical and imagination exercises. The class is designed to develop concentration and movement as well as interpersonal communication skills appropriate for stage performance. The course focuses on basic audition skills.

THT 118 - Theatre Appreciation

3.00 Cr
A course that aims to develop culturally literate citizens through study of theatre. While asking difficult questions about the realities of fine arts in our society, students will develop skills in research for theatre and take on real-world projects related to the stage. This course also requires attendance from a menu of performance opportunities in Helena.

THT 121 - Stagecraft

3.00 Cr
This is a practical course in stagecraft. This includes construction and design of scenery and properties, stage lighting and sound. Skills involve carpentry, painting, reading design plans, and methods of assembling the set on stage. Participation in current productions is arranged.

THT 207 - Comedy Acting

3.00 Cr
Covering the basics of mime, commedia, clowning and slapstick, this course will have everyone in stitches. A practical course in acting for comedies, the course will focus on tools of comedy and culminate in a laugh-a-second showcase.

THT 208 - Stage Combat

3.00 Cr
Covering the basics of stage combat and safety, this course will keep students moving as they learn techniques in swordplay, brawling, and falls. A practical course, the course will focus on the basics and culminate in fully choreographed showcase.

THT 210 - Creative Drama

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to help teachers and facilitators to learn to use drama as a teaching tool. Perfect for any student, this method particularly helps students who need to engage the material actively to learn it. Through practical exercises in lesson planning and facilitation, students will learn to use drama techniques to teach science, math, literature, social skills, and any other subject you can imagine.

THT 211 - Puppetry

3.00 Cr
Beginning with a study of the history of puppetry and current performance practice, this course also teaches puppet construction techniques and performance. The course culminates in a Puppet Slam Performance.

THT 212 - Advanced Acting

3.00 Cr
An advanced acting course for serious students, this class broadens both the knowledge and experience of acting and acting methods. Students prepare monologues and scenes of various styles, employing in-depth character development and exploring the acting methods of several acting schools. Recommended for majors and minors, others should consult professor before registration.

THT 222 - Intro to Stage Design

3.00 Cr
This course will provide a beginning to design theory in general and then provide students with knowledge and practical work in specific elements of theatre design such as set, light, sound, costume, and makeup design. Subjects covered will include color theory, artistic concepts of shape and line, hand drafting, and collaboration with the entire artistic team.

THT 223 - Costuming

3.00 Cr
This is a practical course in the art and practice of costuming. Besides learning basic sewing skills, we will costume the current productions and study the evolution of clothing through the ages. Each student will learn how to follow a pattern, and build an article of clothing.

THT 224 - Stage Make-Up

3.00 Cr
By creating their own make-up portfolio (morgue), the student will learn the hands-on techniques of applying make-up: realistic and fantastic; and different eras and cultures of make-up styles. In addition, the student will study facial anatomy, the aging process, and the principles of light and shadow as they apply to stage make-up.

THT 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

THT 305 - Theatre Intensive

1.00 Cr
Students may receive credit for completing one to two week intensive courses with master teachers. In general, 1 credit is equal to 45 hours of course work.

THT 310 - Women in Theatre

3.00 Cr
Covering much of the same coursework as the Directing course, this course examines the role women have played in theatre history, and reckons with the current inequality of women leaders in the field. Students will read plays written by female playwrights and will culminate the semester with a staging of a collection of scenes written by women and chosen by the students. This event will be part of the regular Carroll Theatre season.

THT 311 - Directing

3.00 Cr
A practical course in the principles and techniques of bringing a play from the page to the stage. The course provides step-by-step practice in how to approach the play, how to find its dramatic values, and how to direct the production with these aims in mind. Attention will be given to the collaborative nature of art, and the requisite communication skills of a director. The course will delve into the theories and practice of various directing schools of thought and will culminate in the staging of one act plays as part of the Carroll season.

THT 312 - Musical Theatre Act/Audition

3.00 Cr
An advanced acting course, this class will focus on learning techniques which will grow skills in performance of musical theatre and auditioning both for straight plays and musicals. Beginning with a historical study of the origins of musical theatre and its current practice, it will then shift to scene work and audition preparation which integrate tools taught in class and in readings.

THT 313 - Stage Dialects

3.00 Cr
An advanced acting course, this class will focus on learning the International Phonetic Alphabet and how to apply it to dialect work, specifically standard American, standard British, and another dialect of the student's choosing. While there will be some academic work in this course, it will primarily focus on scene work and monologues which integrate tools taught in class and in readings.

THT 314 - Shakespeare in Performance

3.00 Cr
An advanced acting course, this class will focus on learning techniques which will grow skills in performance of Shakespeare. While there will be some academic work in this course, it will primarily focus on scene work and monologues which integrate tools taught in class and in readings.

THT 318 - History of Theatre I(WI)

3.00 Cr
The story of the theatre beginning with its origins in the rituals of primitive man through the cultural explosion of the Renaissance. In addition to the text, several plays representative of the major theatrical ages will be read for insights into how the physical stage, the styles of acting and production, and theatrical convention influenced the dramatic literature of the various periods.

THT 319 - History of Theatre II(WI)

3.00 Cr
A continuance of the story of the theatre, from the English Restoration and through its objective imitation of nature at the end of the 19th century, to its return to subjective reality and ritual in modern times. In addition to the text, several plays representative of the major theatrical ages will be read for insights into the physical stage, the styles of acting and production, and theatrical convention influenced the dramatic literature of the period as well as the modern theatre.

THT 323 - Lighting Design

3.00 Cr
This is a practical study of the lighting design process. The course leads the student step-by-step from script analysis through plotting a finished design. Individual areas of exploration include light and color theory, electricity, and lighting instrumentation and control systems.

THT 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

THT 403 - Theatre Projects

1.00 Cr
An opportunity for qualified theatre students to participate in Carroll College theatre productions as primary designers. Under the guidance of the instructor, the student may direct or design the set, costumes, or lighting for a full-length play.

THT 404 - Theatre Projects

1.00 Cr
An opportunity for qualified theatre students to participate in Carroll College theatre productions as primary designers. Under the guidance of the instructor, the student may direct or design the set, costumes, or lighting for a full-length play.

THT 425 - Internship

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

THT 426 - Dramaturgy (WI)

3.00 Cr
For theatre majors and history students, this course covers dramaturgy, theatre criticism and script analysis. Students will read plays from the current Carroll season as well as other important works of theatre and complete dramaturgical and script analysis projects. Theatre major or minor or consent of instructor.

THT 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

THT 489 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

THT 495 - Senior Seminar

1.00 Cr
This course is designed to help graduating seniors prepare for a career in the arts by providing peer and instructor feedback on resumes and other job materials, educating students on graduate school opportunities, providing advice from career professionals, and giving instruction in job search strategies. The course will require you to build your professional website, create a CV, and prepare resumes.

THT 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.