Course Descriptions

Business Courses

BA 100 - Introduction to Business

3.00 Cr

This course is designed for the student with little or no experience in business and its related fields. This course helps the student to build the necessary understanding of the myriad of business terms that exist today. Topics covered include management, marketing, capitalism, computers, accounting, finance, ethics, and international business.

BA 178 - Entrepreneurship Lectures

1.00 Cr
Seminar class sessions that will run consecutively with the 3 credit Practicum course. Each year the Lecture series date will change to reflect the year. This will give students the opportunity to receive credit for taking the course more than once (each year will be a different lineup of speakers). Will include speakers, outside activities and individual meeting with entrepreneur mentors. Students will be required to attend all presentations and have the option to work with students from the 378 course in the development of their business ideas. It will also be required that BA 178 students are actively involved in Enactus for this semester, giving them the opportunity to apply the skills they are learning in class.

BA 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BA 203 - Principles of Accounting I

3.00 Cr
Principles of Accounting I is an introductory accounting course dealing with the principles of recording, analyzing, and communicating information about the economic activities of organizations. This first semester course includes preparation and interpretation of financial statements (i.e., income statement, retained earnings and stockholders' equity, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows).

BA 204 - Principles of Accounting II

3.00 Cr
Introductory courses dealing with the principles of recording, analyzing, and communicating information about the economic activities of organizations. First semester includes preparation and interpretation of general purpose financial statements, e.g., income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flow. Second semester covers interpretation of information relevant to managerial decisions, e.g., pricing, budgeting, and capital investments.

BA 227 - Nonprofit Fundraising

3.00 Cr
This is a valuable course for anyone expecting to work in a nonprofit organization or serve on a charitable organization's board of directors. The course presents the role and scope of philanthropy in the United States beginning with our western cultural heritage through today's sophisticated marketing-driven technology-based appeals. The structure of fundraising programs is presented as the organizing feature of successful fundraising activities across a range of techniques and approaches from annual fund campaigns to capital campaigns to planned giving programs.

BA 228 - Intro to Nonprofit

3.00 Cr
This course examines the role of the nonprofit sector in; the United States and its relationship to government and the business sector. The unique characteristics of nonprofit organizations such as donated revenue, volunteer boards of directors, multiple revenue sources, and mixed paid and volunteer staffing are examined. The course investigates both governance and management responsibilities and functions. It is appropriate for students in any major since many students will apply their vocations in nonprofit organizations, most will serve on nonprofit boards, and all will certainly be asked to contribute to nonprofits.

BA 289 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

BA 301 - Business Law I

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the study of law designed to acquaint the student with the legal controls under which modern business is conducted. The course covers the law of contracts and agency, bailment, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and corporations.

BA 302 - Business Law II

3.00 Cr
An introduction to the study of law designed to acquaint the student with the legal controls under which modern business is conducted. The course covers the law of contracts and agency, bailment, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, and corporations.

BA 303 - Inter Financial Accounting I

3.00 Cr
Course emphasis is on accounting theory and concepts, as well as analysis of the problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts Course Descriptions to financial accounting. Attention is focused on the use of accounting information as a basis for decision making by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial statements and accounting reports.

BA 304 - Inter Financial Accounting II

3.00 Cr
Course emphasis is on accounting theory and concepts, as well as analysis of the problems that arise in applying these underlying concepts to financial accounting. Attention is focused on the use of accounting information as a basis for decision making by management, stockholders, creditors, and other users of financial statements and accounting reports.

BA 306 - Marketing

3.00 Cr

An introduction to marketing and management decision making in the pricing, promotion, and distribution of products. Consideration of the behavioral, legal, ethical, competitive, and economic environments as they affect decisions in domestic and international business organizations.

BA 307 - Accouting Finance Entrepreneur

1.00 Cr
Accounting and Finance for the Entrepreneur/Small Business Owner. This course examines a targeted curriculum of accounting and finance designed for the entrepreneur or business owner. This course covers topics such as whether owning a business is appropriate for the individual, managing cash flows, types of organizations, time management, financial management, the basics of record keeping, banking services available for the small organization, organizational planning for a healthy entity, the basics of credit reporting, risk management, insurance, basic tax planning and reporting, and how to sell a small business and plan for succession. Offered Fall.

BA 310 - Govn'mnt & Not-For-Profit Acct

3.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to governmental and not-for-profit accounting. It covers terminology and transactions encountered in governmental and not for profit organizations. Preparation of financial statements according to GASB or FASB standards and decision-making from those statements are included in the course.

BA 311 - Individual Federal Taxation

3.00 Cr
An application of income taxation for individuals and small businesses. Covers common aspects of typical 1040 tax returns including income, deductions and losses, and property transactions.

BA 312 - Fed Taxation: Corp/Partnership

1.00 Cr
This course is taught the last quarter of the semester following BA 311 and covers aspects of corporate and partnership taxation.

BA 313 - Managerial Finance

3.00 Cr
A consideration of financial concepts as applicable to modern firms. Topics include cash flow, financial ratios, the time value of money, the cost of capital, capital budgeting, the income tax environment, and aspects of long-term financing with bonds, preferred stocks, and common stocks.

BA 315 - Cost Accounting

3.00 Cr
A consideration of those principles relating to the accounting systems used by manufacturing concerns. The job-order cost system, the standard cost system, and process cost systems are studied together with selected managerial accounting principles such as relevant costs.

BA 316 - Cost Accounting II

3.00 Cr
A continuation of BA 315, the course extends coverage of managerial and cost accounting concepts as they are applied in planning, pricing products, and controlling business firms' activities.

BA 318 - Personal Finance

3.00 Cr

Designed to help the student plan the handling of finances in everyday business transactions. Topics included are budgeting, credit, savings, insurance, income tax, investment, and estate planning. Fall semester.

BA 328 - Personal Selling

3.00 Cr
This course is a study of the skills needed to develop and manage long-term relationships with customers and suppliers. Emphasis is placed on relationship selling, presentation, prospecting, handling objections and closing techniques with consideration given to differences in the global marketplace. Personal Selling covers professional selling practices and philosophies, provides a basic introduction to the activities of sales management, training and recruitment, performance evaluation, compensation, budgeting as well as time and territory management.

BA 351 - Banking Management

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to disseminate information to students interested in acquiring more knowledge in the areas of lending and banking operations including the roles, duties and responsibilities of bankers to their customers as well as their industry.

BA 360 - Accounting & Finance Info Syst

3.00 Cr
This course acquaints students with accounting and finance information systems. Topics include business processes, transaction processing, internal controls, data security, systems documentation, information technology, and software applications.

BA 365 - Financial Analysis Using Excel

3.00 Cr
This course assists students to become proficienct in making financial decisions and analyzing financial statements using software solutions. Students will create templates for a variety of financial problems and investment decisions. Students will also explore capabilities for a wide range of data presentation solutions.

BA 375 - Fundamentals of Management

3.00 Cr
An introduction to effective management practices, including planning, staffing, organizing, leading, and controlling organizational functions.

BA 377 - Entrepreneurship (WI)

3.00 Cr
Entrepreneurship will provide students with the opportunity to engage in an experiential learning exercise in which the student will develop a substantial business plan in order to implement the knowledge gained within the class to a meaningful application of the class material.

BA 378 - Entrepreneurship Practicum

3.00 Cr
Application and experiential learning opportunities, based upon business plan ideas that were developed in BA 377. Experiential learning that will enhance entrepreneurial leadership skills, strategic business planning, exploration of funding options and professional communication. Students will work with faculty members, SBA, MBAC, SCORE and an Entrepreneur in Residence to help master these skills. Practicum students will be required to enroll in the Cengage Small Business Management online curriculum, giving them access to resources and a framework for developing and implementing their business venture. There will be a limit of 10 students per semester. Only students pursuing the entrepreneurship certificate will be able to enroll.

BA 380 - E-Commerce

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to expose students to the multi-faceted aspects of electronic commerce. The course will integrate the different business disciplines found in electronic commerce such as accounting, finance, marketing, law, and management. Students will develop skills in analyzing and formulating electronic business solutions. Issues in security, risk management, control, technology and regulations will be explored.

BA 392 - International Business(GD&WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is intended as the student's introductory course in international business. Topics included will be how managers deal with the international monetary system, as well as the various environments, organizations, and uncontrollable factors that make up the foreign environments. It will also deal with these factors' impact on the business and the functions of management.

BA 393 - India: Socioeconomic Issues

3.00 Cr
One in six individuals is Indian. The socioeconomic status of these individuals is framed by the country's rich traditions and developed through a combination of education, occupation, and income. Students exploring global diversity will examine India's delicate balance between tradition and modernization including globalization's impact on traditional gender roles, the family, and related socioeconomic issues. In this process, students will develop an appreciation of Indian culture and its influence over business relationships. Students exploring national diversity will consider socioeconomic issues experienced by Indians living in the United States along with possible biases faced due to religious or cultural heritage.

BA 401 - International Marketing

3.00 Cr
This course continues where the principles of marketing and international business leave off and addresses global issues and describes concepts relevant to all international marketers. Emphasis is on the strategic implications of competition in different country markets. This environmental/cultural approach permits a truly global concentration where one is not limited to any specific nation or singular way of doing business.

BA 405 - Auditing (WI)

3.00 Cr
This course is an introduction to the principles of auditing with a focus on financial statement audits for both public and non-public entities. The course presents conceptual consideration of the environment and philosophy of auditing and practical aspects of auditing techniques and procedures. Topics include professional standards and ethics, audit evidence, internal controls, audit procedures, and audit opinions.

BA 406 - Auditing II

3.00 Cr
A continuation of BA 405, the course extends coverage of financial and operating auditing philosophies and techniques. An audit simulation is a central part of the course.

BA 407 - Advanced Accounting

3.00 Cr
Accounting principles applicable to partnerships, branches, and consolidated financial statements.

BA 408 - Human Resource Management

3.00 Cr
This course deals with the functions of the human resource office. Topics include but are not limited to compensation administration, wage and salary administration, legal constraints, policies and procedures, and collective bargaining. While theory is discussed, emphasis is on practical application.

BA 409 - Operations Research

3.00 Cr
This course provides an introduction to quantitative modeling methods used in business, economics, and public administration. The course focuses on computer implementation of the models, the application of these models to practical decision-making scenarios, and sensitivity analysis of the model assumptions. Operations research tools including optimization, queuing, simulation, forecasting, and decision analysis are covered.

BA 410 - Business Policy

3.00 Cr
Capstone course for business majors. Students apply the lessons learned from courses in accounting, business, and economics to contemporary problems in business. Analysis includes tools and techniques learned in the business curricula. Investigation of issues is accomplished in a case approach context. Contemporary business readings are used. Final assessment test for majors in Business Administration will be given in this class.

BA 411 - Investment Management

3.00 Cr
A study of the basic concepts of investing. Topics covered include the stock and bond markets, commodities, options, money market funds, and mutual funds. An analysis of investment strategies and portfolio management as they apply to both the small and large investor.

BA 413 - Organizational Behavior

3.00 Cr
Allows student to gain insight and knowledge concerning the behavior of individuals and groups in organizational settings in order to predict likely future behavior and aid in the accomplishment of organizational goals.

BA 417 - CPA/CMA Review

3.00 Cr
Designed to prepare individuals for the uniform CPA and CMA professional examinations.

BA 425 - BA Internship:

1.00 Cr
Internship Programs Recognizing that learning can take place outside the classroom, Carroll College allows its students to participate in a work program that relates to their area of studies. This employment must relate directly to classroom work in order to qualify for an internship. Close cooperation between Carroll and the participating companies insures a work experience that contributes significantly to the student?s overall growth and professional development. Juniors and seniors in any major area may participate with the approval of the department chairperson, academic advisor, and the internship coordinator. Students will receive academic credit and may or may not receive monetary compensation for an internship. A student may earn a maximum of 6 semester hours in the internship program. Enrollment in the course must be during the same semester in which the majority of the work experience takes place. Interested students should contact their academic advisor and the intership coordinator at the Career Services Office.

BA 451 - Adv Financial Analysis/Plan

3.00 Cr
CAPSTONE COURSE FOR FINANCE MAJOR. Examines variables relevant to financial problems. Develops skills, techniques, and judgment necessary to make financial decisions.

BA 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
The Independent Study form is availble in the Registrar's Office or MyCaroll Document Center. Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

BA 499 - Senior Thesis

1.00 Cr
The senior thesis is designed to encourage creative thinking and to stimulate individual research. A student may undertake a thesis in an area in which s/he has the necessary background. Ordinarily a thesis topic is chosen in the student's major or minor. It is also possible to choose an interdisciplinary topic. Interested students should decide upon a thesis topic as early as possible in the junior year so that adequate attention may be given to the project. In order to be eligible to apply to write a thesis, a student must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 based upon all courses attempted at Carroll College. The thesis committee consists of a director and two readers. The thesis director is a full-time Carroll College faculty member from the student's major discipline or approved by the department chair of the student's major. At least one reader must be from outside the student's major. The thesis director and the appropriate department chair must approve all readers. The thesis committee should assist and mentor the student during the entire project. For any projects involving human participants, each student and his or her director must follow the guidelines published by the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students must submit a copy of their IRB approval letter with their thesis application. As part of the IRB approval process, each student and his or her director must also complete training by the National Cancer Institute Protection of Human Participants. The thesis is typically to be completed for three (3) credits in the discipline that best matches the content of the thesis. Departments with a designated thesis research/writing course may award credits differently with approval of the Curriculum Committee. If the thesis credits exceed the full-time tuition credit limit for students, the charge for additional credits will be waived. Applications and further information are available in the Registrar's Office.

BA 501 - Prof. Ethics & Legal Issues

3.00 Cr
This course examines the professional and legal responsibilities of accountants with emphasis placed on the professional standards for certified public accountants. Legal implications of business transactions and situations that create potential ethical dilemmas are explored. The course hones research and presentation skills. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 503 - Financial Accounting

3.00 Cr
Financial Accounting Theory, Research, & Practice. Financial reporting conceptual frameworks, principles, and rules for various entities are explored in this course. Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge as well as the ability to apply the skills in a variety of financial reporting situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 506 - Advanced Auditing

3.00 Cr
This course is an in-depth examination of the auditing and attestation standards for both issuers (public companies) and non-issuers (nonpublic companies). Topics include contemporary auditing issues, ethical responsibilities of the auditor, and the ability to research complex situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 507 - Advanced Accounting Topics

3.00 Cr
Complex issues in contemporary financial reporting including business combinations, partnerships, and international transactions are explored. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 510 - Not-For-Profit Accounting

3.00 Cr
This course examines unique aspects of not-for-profit entities along with the related reporting intricacies. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 511 - Tax Research/Practice

3.00 Cr
In-depth coverage of federal income tax theory and practice related to individual, partnership, and corporate tax issues. The course hones research and presentation skills in addition to application of tax law to a variety of complex tax situations. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 521 - Advanced Taxation Topics

3.00 Cr
This course explores complex tax issues with particular focus on federal income tax law related to trusts, estates, and gifts. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 526 - Forensics/Data Analytics

3.00 Cr
Fraud motivation, forensic auditing tools and techniques, and legal issues are examined in this course. The course includes data analytics as applied to forensic investigations and financial reporting issues. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 536 - Sustainability Reporting

3.00 Cr
This course explores contemporary issues related to the integration of social responsibility, environmental issues, and long-term profitability in an entity's reporting. GRI sustainability reporting guidelines, the IIRC framework, and the environmental, social, and governance (ESG) standards of the SASB are examined. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

BA 575 - Issues in Business

3.00 Cr
Contemporary issues such as governance, globalization, economic concerns, information systems, financial and operational management, and strategic planning are among the topics covered in this course. Prerequisites: Admission to the Master of Accountancy.

EC 106 - Survey of Economics

3.00 Cr
Provides an introduction to contemporary economic issues and accompanying public policies. Topics covered include inflation, deficit, unemployment, interest rates and financial institutions, social security, pollution, prices, and profits of businesses. This course is designed for non-majors. Departmental majors may take the course, but also must complete EC 201-202.

EC 189 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 201 - Principles of Economics

3.00 Cr
Basic economic principles of individual and business decision making concerning the use of resources and products in the market setting of the U.S. economy. Fundamentals of supply and demand and microeconomics are emphasized first semester. Fundamentals of macroeconomics is the focus of the second semester. Covers role of government and Federal Reserve system in achieving full employment and price stability, international economics, and balance of payment problems.

EC 202 - Principles of Economics

3.00 Cr
Basic economic principles of individual and business decision making concerning the use of resources and products in the market setting of the U.S. economy. Fundamentals of supply and demand and microeconomics are emphasized first semester. Fundamentals of macroeconomics is the focus of the second semester. Covers role of government and Federal Reserve system in achieving full employment and price stability, international economics, and balance of payment problems.

EC 203 - Project Management Economics

3.00 Cr
This course introduces students to three vital components of project management, each of which contains economic aspects. The three components are financial activities of the project manager, economic analysis, and legal considerations. Examples and case studies will address situations that require decisions having economic implications from project managers in the industrial, commercial, professional, and public sectors. Topics covered include developing project scopes, schedules and budgets, evaluating capital expenditures, considering operational costs, reviewing contracts and specifications, and addressing ethical dilemmas. Three class hours per week.

EC 302 - Labor Relations/Public Policy

3.00 Cr
A balanced approach to labor relations. Topics covered include the evolution of American labor, labor law and public policy, organizing and collective bargaining, wage-benefit and non-wage issues in collective bargaining, contract negotiations, union-management cooperation, contract administration, and special issues in labor relations.

EC 304 - Public Finance

3.00 Cr
Study of the impact of government entities on the U.S. economy. Includes principles and methods of taxation; ex-amination of state, local, and federal expenditure patterns; and public sector decision making and administration.

EC 305 - Economics of Sports

3.00 Cr
This course applies economic concepts to help understand the place of professional and collegiate sports in modern society. The course applies microeconomics and behavioral economics to professional sports franchises and leagues, such as the financing of stadiums and player salaries. Analysis of the sports industry will include both private market competition and public laws and subsidies. The class also incudes analysis of cheating and gambling race and gender, coaching and game strategy.

EC 309 - Financial Markets and Institut

3.00 Cr
Theory of money as a medium of exchange; mechanics of deposit creation, the Federal Reserve system and U.S. financial institutions. Monetary theory of the effect of money on the economy as well as monetary policy tools and applications for stabilizing the economy.

EC 389 - Special Topic

1.00 Cr
Special Topics courses include ad-hoc courses on various selected topics that are not part of the regular curriculum, however they may still fulfill certain curricular requirements. Special topics courses are offered at the discretion of each department and will be published as part of the semester course schedule - view available sections for more information. Questions about special topics classes can be directed to the instructor or department chair.

EC 393 - India: Socioeconomic Issues

3.00 Cr
One in six individuals is Indian. The socioeconomic status of these individuals is framed by the country's rich traditions and developed through a combination of education, occupation, and income. Students exploring global diversity will examine India's delicate balance between tradition and modernization including globalization's impact on traditional gender roles, the family, and related socioeconomic issues. In this process, students will develop an appreciation of Indian culture and its influence over business relationships. Students exploring national diversity will consider socioeconomic issues experienced by Indians living in the United States along with possible biases faced due to religious or cultural heritage.

EC 401 - Intermediate Microeconomics

3.00 Cr
An intensive study of the theory of price in product and resource markets. Special emphasis on application of modern tools of analysis to specific business and public problems.

EC 406 - International Economics

3.00 Cr
A survey of international economic relations. The major concepts covered are comparative advantage, impacts of tariffs, economic integration, exchange rates, and balance of payments. Concepts are analyzed from a policy viewpoint in order to increase awareness of international economic problems.

EC 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

PMGT 210 - Planning/Scheduling Projects

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on the techniques used to plan, schedule and estimate project work. Using project planning, scheduling tools and simulation exercises, students will experience creating and managing project schedules. Students will be required to solve planning challenges in the role of project manager using scope definition and planning techniques dessigned to create accurate estimates and schedules that ensure successful outcomes.

PMGT 220 - Project Risk/Monitor Control

3.00 Cr
This course will focus on the principles and practice of managing and controlling project risk and cost. Using case studies and team activities, students will gain valuable skills in risk analysis, cost estimating, scope control and project performance monitoring for completing projects within their planned scope, cost and schedule. Students will learn to use qualitative and quantitative risk analysis techniques to identify risks, determine impact and plan responses. Types of risk that commonly impact projects will be examined. Cost control and monitoring techniques will also be emphasized.

PMGT 310 - Project Leadership

3.00 Cr
This course is designed to help the student set realistic objectives, create strategies to overcome resistance, and implement for success. Students will learn how to gain buy-in and motivate others to change as well as identify stressors, modify negative patterns, and manage conflict and challenging situations. Through the use of hands- on exercises and case studies the student centers on the importance and types of project requirements, how to partner with stakeholders and use teamwork in the requirements gathering process, how to identify requirements-related project start-up issues, the essential elements of communicating requirements, and being agile. Students will work individually and in teams using case studies from actual projects to apply the techniques and practices discussed in the class.

PMGT 485 - Independent Study

1.00 Cr
Independent study is open to junior and senior students only. At the time of application, a student must have earned a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. A student may register for no more than three (3) semester hours of independent study in any one term. In all cases, registration for independent study must be approved by the appropriate department chairperson and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.