Carroll College, Helena Montana

Current Courses

Current Courses

Spring, 2014

  • Latin 204. Continues the student’s introduction to Latin begun in LA101-102.  More advanced latin grammar is presented, and the course slowly increases the amount of translation from Latin authors. Latin grammar is presented in a way that is understandable to students and at the same time preserves what is best in the long tradition of classical scholarship. Class material reflects Roman thought, history, mythology and philosophy, and includes the most famous quotations and excerpts of the best Latin writers and thinkers.
  • BioEthics (PHIL208). The study of the morality of human choices and actions that occur especially in medicine and medical practice.
  • Environmental Ethics (PHIL206). The study of how we should conceive of our relationship to the world and the environment, and what sorts of interventions into the environment are morally defensible.

Summer, 2014

  • Ethics (PHIL107). The philosophical study of good and bad, right and wrong, the defense of principles and rules of morality.

Fall, 2014

  • Business Ethics (PHIL207). The study of business and business life from a personal and a social perspective, and the study of the morality of human choices and actions that occur in business and corporate life.
  • Philosophy of Human Being (PHIL121). The philosophical study of human nature and the human person, and implications of our thinking on this topic on our beliefs about some key aspects of human life, for example, the nature of the mind, the existence of the soul, and human immortality.
  • Philosophy in Film (PHIL189). Introduction to philosophy through film; includes a consider of philosophical methodology, the epistemology of self-knowledge, the sublime, ethics, and the purpose of life. Spring 2013 version
  • Latin 203.Continues the student’s introduction to Latin begun in LA101-102.  More advanced latin grammar is presented, and the course slowly increases the amount of translation from Latin authors. Latin grammar is presented in a way that is understandable to students and at the same time preserves what is best in the long tradition of classical scholarship. Class material reflects Roman thought, history, mythology and philosophy, and includes the most famous quotations and excerpts of the best Latin writers and thinkers.
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Other Course Syllabi

  • Medieval Philosophy (PHIL202)The study of the philosophy that occurred in the "Middle Ages," the thousand years beginning roughly in the middle of the Sixth century (550) and ending roughly in the Sixteenth century (1500).
  • Philosophy Seminar (PHIL495): Mind, and Materialism.Thomas Nagel is a leading figure of American philosophy, but his 2012 book, Mind and Cosmos, brought rebuttals, sarcastic comments, and outright dismissals from fellow philosophers. The book was critical about evolutionary explanation, but its crime was to defend a dualism in the face of a materialistic story being told about human origins from science.  Nagel’s book uncovered some interesting fault lines in contemporary philosophy, beyond the typical  “Intelligent Design” versus “Chance” positions we often associate with evolution; and these fault lines have begun to be pressed more publically in the last few years.  The course begins with Nagel’s book to discern Nagel’s objections to the “materialist Darwinian conception of nature.”  Then we shall look at a selection of the reviews of the book, and then turn to Nagel’s previous book, The View from Nowhere. Then we shall look at a similar project, from a Thomistic/Aristotelian perspective. Finally, we will bring the look more thematically at the supposed conflict between religion and science as we work through Al Plantinga’s reflections on science, religion and naturalism, where he criticizes the defense of evolution by philosophers like Daniel Dennett.
  • Philosophy in Film (PHIL189). Introduction to philosophy through film; includes a consider of philosophical methodology, the epistemology of self-knowledge, the sublime, ethics, and the purpose of life. Fall, 2012 version
  • Ancient Philosophy (PHIL151). Survey of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers and philosophical themes.
  • Ethics (PHIL107). The philosophical study of good and bad, right and wrong, the defense of principles and rules of morality.
  • Ethical Issues in Contemporary Media (PHIL496). The course considers the ethics in the use of contemporary media and the media’s presentation of ethical issues that become part of public consciousness.
  • Philosophy of God and Religion (PHIL216). Surveys philosophical reflection on the topics of God and Religion.
  • Modern Philosophy (PHIL303). Considers the topics of the relationship of experience to reality, the ultimate origin of knowledge, the nature of the mind and its relationship to the body, the implications of the new natural sciences for our understanding of free will and God, as these topics were discussed by philosophers in the 15th through 18th centuries, principally the workds of Descartes, Locke, and Immanuel Kant. 
  • Environmental Ethics (PHIL206). The study of how we should conceive of our relationship to the world and the environment, and what sorts of interventions into the environment are morally defensible.
  •  Ethical Theory (PHIL324). An introduction to philosophical theories about the nature of ethics and ethical reasoning, with special focus on the contemporary situation of ethical philosophy.
  • Philosophy Seminar: Sex and Gender (PHIL495). A philosophical reflection on the themes and assumptions involved in contemporary discussion involving sexuality and gender. Topics include: the relationship between sex and gender, the nature of human sexuality, the ethical boundaries of sexual activity, the role of the family, politics of gender, and religious use of gender language. Offered as a philosophy seminar in Fall, 2003.
  • Perspectives in Philosophy (PHIL101). An introduction to philosophy by considering the meaning of life, and how this basic question draws us into other ultimate questions such as what can we know, what is a human being, is there a God, what is the good. 
  • Critical Thinking (PHIL114). The study of reasoning as it occurs in the thinking, speaking, and writing we meet in “everyday” contexts. Critical thinking equips students to analyze and assess opinions and arguments according to clearly identifiable standards of proof.
  • Contemporary Philosophy (PHIL304). The study of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century philosophy and philosophers, including the writings Hegel, Mill, Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Husserl, Russell, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Sartre, De Beauvoir, and Derrida.
  • Honors Seminar/Judeo-Christian and Medieval Thought (HNR250). An exploration of Judeo-Christian and Medieval thought as that is presented in the Bible and in some of the greatest writers of the Medieval Period, including St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Chaucer, Malory, and Erasmus.
  • Honors Seminar/Renaissance Thought (HNR251). An exploration of Renaissance thought as that is presented in some of the great writers of the renaissance period, including Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Descartes, Bacon, Galileo, Milton and Pascal.

 

 

 

Medieval Philosophy (PHIL302)The study of the philosophy that occurred in the "Middle Ages," the thousand years beginning roughly in the middle of the Sixth century (550) and ending roughly in the Sixteenth century (1500).