Carroll College, Helena Montana

Course Descriptions

Course Descriptions

Foundations in the American Constitutional Tradition (6 credits):

PO 104 American National Government 3 Cr
An introduction to the institutions of American national government. The focus will be on the presidency, congress, courts, and the system of federalism. The class will also probe national elections, political parties, interest groups, and concepts of “checks and balances” and “separation of powers.” This course is required for all political science majors and minors. Fall semester.

PO 205 Early Modern Political Thought 3 Cr (WI)
This course is an examination of the political thinkers from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment through detailed study of selected writings of Machiavelli, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, and selected writings of the American Founders. The goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the intellectual roots of modern politics and to examine early modern opinions concerning human nature, good governance, and justice within and among nations. Particular attention will be devoted to the dominant ide- ology of the modern world, liberalism. Fall semester, odd-numbered years.

The American Founding and American Constitutional History (3 credits):

HI 121-122 History of the United States 6 Cr
An introductory survey of the American experience from the Age of Exploration to the present, with emphasis on those national traits which continue to influence American attitudes and actions. Required of all history majors. Offered annually annually in the fall (HI 121) and the spring (HI 122). HI 121 fulfills the National Diversity requirement.

HI 322 Civil War and Reconstruction 3 Cr
An investigation of the ideas, personalities, and events of the critical years between 1830-1890. Includes an examination of abolitionists, sectionalism, civil rights, and military action. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

PO 104 American National Government 3 Cr
An introduction to the institutions of American national government. The focus will be on the presidency, congress, courts, and the system of federalism. The class will also probe national elections, political parties, interest groups, and concepts of “checks and balances” and “separation of powers.” This course is required for all political science majors and minors. Fall semester.

PO 210 Introduction to Constitutional Law 3 Cr
This general survey course is an introduction to some of the key Supreme Court decisions in the development of constitutional law in the United States. Through analysis and briefing of cases, students will be able to develop their thinking and writing skills while they learn how constitutional doctrine emerges and changes in areas such as separation of powers, fed- eralism and civil liberties as the ongoing struggle to interpret the meaning of our Constitution continues. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

PO 216 American Political Thought 3 Cr
This introductory course surveys the central issues of American political thought from the founding of the Republic to the present. The focus will be on selected critical periods in American history characterized by heightened conflict over America’s operative ideals, including revolutionary America and the struggle over the Constitution, the Civil War, Depression and New Deal, and the Vietnam era. Fall semester, even-numbered years.

PO 230 Montana State Politics 3 Cr
An introductory analysis of Montana state politics and political institutions. The course will explore federalism, Montana political history, and contem- porary policy issues. Spring semester, odd-numbered years.

PO 315 Congress and the Presidency 3 Cr
An examination of the structure and the powers of the U.S. Senate, House of Representatives, and the Presidency. Attention will be given to explor- ing the historical evolution of both institutions, changes in the power and function of the two branches, the role of public opinion and elections, and congressional-executive relations. Spring semester, even-numbered years.

PO 380 Moot Court Team 1-3 Cr
The course will focus on the preparation of an appellate legal brief to a mock United States Supreme Court analyzing constitutional law. Students will be challenged to read and analyze key United States Supreme Court cases and trained to orally argue before a panel of judges while responding to the panel’s questions. Instructor permission required to enroll. Moot Court Team is strongly recommended for students who are interested in attending law school. Only 3 credits of Moot Court may be applied to the political science major. Fall semester.

SO 314 Sociology of Law 3 Cr
Examination of social processes involved in enacting legislation, law en- forcement, and judicial decisions along with the roles of lawyers, judges, and others in both civil and criminal systems. Recommended for those interested in law, law enforcement, or areas related to the legal system. Prerequisite: SO 101 or consent of instructor. Fulfills Global Diversity re- quirement. Fall semester, even-numbered years.

Comparative Constitutionalism and International Law (6 credits):

HI 241 History of the Modern Middle East 3 Cr
For purposes of this class, the modern Middle East is defined as 1914– present, territorially and politically stretching from Egypt to Iran, including Israel/Palestine, the Arabian Peninsula, and Turkey. As time allows, we will consider North Africa as a region with cultural, linguistic, and religious ties to the Middle East but also very different, as well as Afghanistan, and Pakistan. This course carefully considers how history, culture, politics, economics, and geography, as well as all three Abrahamic faiths—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—shaped the region’s past, are inextricably tied to its present, and help us think about what the future might hold. This class also addresses matters of gender, violence, terrorism, and the chances for a lasting peace. Finally, colonialism and imperialism continue to resonate throughout the Middle East, making it necessary to exam the roles of such countries as Britain, France, Russia, and the United States. Spring semester, odd-numbered years. Fulfills Global Diversity requirement.

HI 251 Introduction to East Asia 3 Cr
A survey of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean culture and history, with em- phasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Fall semester, even-numbered years. Fulfills Global Diversity requirement.

HI 271 History of Modern Latin America 3 Cr
A survey of the major trends in the political, social, economic and intellectual development of Latin America since independence. The primary focus will be on the histories of Mexico, Cuba, Brazil and Argentina, although exam- ples from across the region will be studied. Offered at the discretion of the department. Fulfills Global Diversity requirement.

HI 291 Modern African History 3 Cr
A survey of Sub-Saharan African history from the eighteenth to the twen- ty-first centuries with an emphasis on formal colonization, colonialism, decolonization, and post-colonial developments. Fall semester, even-num- bered years. Fulfills the Global Diversity requirement.

PO 102 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 Cr (GD)
This course introduces students to government and politics outside the United States. The workings of different forms of government will be studied in a variety of countries each year. This course is required of all political science majors and minors. Spring semester.

PO 324 Topics in Comparative Politics of 3 Cr
Industrialized Countries This course is an upper-division seminar in comparative politics. The course may be arranged thematically (e.g., a comparative study of constitutions, a survey of the development of the European Union, or a comparison of countries’ relations with indigenous peoples), or may be a detailed study of a country or countries (e.g., a study of Canadian politics or a comparison of the political development and institutions of China and Russia). Previous lower division study of politics is helpful, but not required. Fall semester, odd-numbered years.

PO 348 International Negotiation Simulation 3 Cr (GD)
The first part of this course prepares students for participation in an inter- collegiate simulation involving negotiations on various international issues by studying how foreign policy is formulated in different countries, reviewing general principles of international relations, analyzing competing negoti- ation strategies, and researching contemporary issues of global concern. The last part of the course involves student participation in an international negotiation simulation with other collegiate teams via computer networks. Spring semester, odd-numbered years.

Constitutionalism: History and Philosophy (6 credits):

PHIL 256 Social and Political Philosophy 3 Cr
A critical review of theories of political, social, and economic organiza- tionthat have shaped Western social and political thinking in the 19th and 20th centuries. The philosophical underpinnings of “political theory” will be explored through a close examination of historical events and the rela- tionship between theory and practice. Spring semester. May fulfill Writing Intensive requirement.

PHIL 315 20th Century European Philosophy 3 Cr
An investigation of the most salient movements in philosophy that have developed in 20th century Europe. These include: Existentialism, Phenomenology, Hermeneutics, Structuralism, Post-Structuralism and Critical theory. Prerequisite: previous philosophy course or consent of instructor. Fall semester, even-numbered years.

PHIL 324 Ethical Theory 3 Cr
An intensive exploration of enduring theoretical issues in ethics such as relative and absolute moral laws, subjective and objective components of moral knowledge, the relation of facts in nature to human values, and the place of reason in ethical decisions. Prerequisite: Previous philosophy course or consent of instructor. Spring semester, even-numbered years. Fulfills Writing Intensive requirement.

PO 100 Justice and the Just Society: 3 Cr
Introduction to Politics This course constitutes an introduction to the fundamental questions of political inquiry—What is justice? How ought we to live our lives? What is the best regime?—through a detailed study of books written by thinkers who offer very different answers to these questions. This course is required for all political science majors and minors. Fall semester.

PO 205 Early Modern Political Thought 3 Cr (WI) 
This course is an examination of the political thinkers from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment through detailed study of selected writings of Machiavelli, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, and selected writings of the American Founders. The goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the intellectual roots of modern politics and to examine early modern opinions concerning human nature, good governance, and justice within and among nations. Particular attention will be devoted to the dominant ide- ology of the modern world, liberalism. Fall semester, odd-numbered years.

PO 331 Classical Political Thought 3 Cr
This course is a survey of ancient political philosophy through detailed study of selected writings of Plato, Xenophon, Aristotle, Thucydides and others. The goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the classical al- ternatives to our way of thinking about politics, justice, and the proper ends of human life. Particular attention will be devoted to the thought of Plato and the character of Socrates. Previous lower division study of political ideas is helpful, but not required. Offered spring semester, even-numbered years.

PO 332 Late Modern Political Thought 3 Cr
This course is a survey of the political thinkers from the French Revolution to the twentieth century through detailed study of selected writings of Rousseau, Hegel, Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, and contemporary authors. The goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the intellectual de- bates that have arisen among liberals, as well as the prominent alternatives to liberalism that exist. Previous lower division study of political ideas is helpful, but not required. Offered spring semester, odd-numbered years.

TH 263 Modern Catholic Social Teaching* 3 Cr
A study of the cultural, political, and economic spheres of social life in the light of Catholic moral teachings, theologies, and action. Magisterial and 
scholarly writings from 1891 to the present receive primary emphasis. The course also includes a service learning component. Offered at the discretion of the department.