Carroll College, Helena Montana

Course Descriptions

BI: Courses in Biochemistry-Molecular Biology

BI 171  Biological Principles I  4 cr
An introductory course focusing upon fundamental biological concepts and methods for students planning to major in biology or for students needing to satisfy a professional school requirement in biology. This course, the first in a two semester series, focuses on biomolecules, the molecular components of life, fundamental cell structures and an introduction to genetics. This course provides a foundation for more advanced courses in the biology major’s program and is a prerequisite for all other courses in the program. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon the evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry. Offered annually. Fall semester.

BI 172  Biological Principles II  4 cr
An introductory course focusing upon fundamental biological concepts and methods for students planning to major in biology or for students needing to satisfy a professional school requirement in biology. This course, the second in a two semester series, focuses on the biological principles of evolution and speciation, a survey of biological diversity, the study of plant form and function and the study of animal form and function. This course provides a foundation for more advanced courses in the biology major’s program and is a prerequisite for all other courses in the program. Particular emphasis in the course is placed upon evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of information. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.  Prerequisite: BI 171 with a minimum grade of “C”. Offered annually. Spring semester.

BI 281 Genetics  4 cr
A study of the principles of inheritance at the organismal and molecular levels. Topics include transmission mechanisms, linkage, DNA replication and gene expression. The laboratory will include an introduction to current molecular genetics techniques. Both lecture and lab will emphasize problem solving and experimental data analysis. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: BI 171-172 and CH 101-102 with a minimum grade of “C”. Offered annually. Fall semester.

BI 382 Cell Biology 4 Cr
This upper-division course focuses on the cell as the basic unit of structure and function in living things. Topics include cellular organization, the structures and functions of cellular organelles and the cytoskeleton, energy transformations, communication between cells, and the cell cycle. Methods used to study cells and their component parts will be introduced in the laboratory portion of the course. Laboratories will introduce advanced techniques in molecular/cellular biology. Lectures will integrate material from genetics, chemistry and introductory biology. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BI 281 and either CH 301 or CH 285, each with a minimum grade of “C”. Offered annually. Spring semester.

BI 420 Topics in Biological Sciences  2 cr
lecture-discussion format. Fundamental themes in biology (for example evolution, anatomical structure and function, molecular systems) will be explored from the perspective of specific sub-disciplines (ecology, microbiology,genetics, cell biology, plant biology, animal physiology). The focus of each section will be determined by the individual instructor. Sections share the common requirements of critical reading of the primary literature, evaluation of information, discussion, and extensive writing. Two lectures/discussions per week. Prerequisite: BI 281 with a minimum grade of “C” or consent of the Instructor. Offered annually, both semesters (topics vary; see schedule). Fulfills Writing Intensive requirement.

BMB 496 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 1 Cr
Senior Seminar
This course focuses on critical evaluation of information relevant to biochemistry
and molecular biology (BMB). Students will discuss issues
relevant to BMB research, ethics, funding and careers. Students will read,
evaluate, and discuss past and current literature in biochemistry and molecular
biology. Each student will provide oral presentations of work that
they have reviewed. Prerequisite: Senior status in BMB major. Offered
spring semester.

CH 101-102 General Chemistry 8 Cr
Principles of chemistry for students majoring in science or engineering. First semester topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, thermochemistry, and intermolecular forces. Second semester topics include solutions, chemical equilibrium, acid/base chemistry. oxidation/reduction, thermodynamics, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: High school algebra. High school chemistry recommended. Students must receive a “C” or better in CH 101 to enroll in CH 102. Offered annually. CH 101 Fall semester, CH 102 Spring semester.

CH 301-302 Organic Chemistry 8 Cr
The chemistry of carbon-based compounds. The course will examine the main classes of organic compounds in terms of preparation, structure, physical and spectral properties, methods of functional group transformation, and mechanism of reaction. In the second semester of the laboratory sequence, students will perform an independent organic laboratory project. There will be an emphasis on oral and written scientific communication of the projects results. Three lectures and one 3 1/2- hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in CH 102 or consent of instructor. Students must pass CH 301 with a “C” or better to enroll in CH 302. Offered annually. CH 301 Fall semester. CH 302 Spring semester.

CH 353   Biochemistry  4 cr.
A study of the chemical principles governing biological macromolecules. Topics include protein structure and function, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics, carbohydrates and lipids, energetics and major metabolic pathways. The laboratory will include both computer simulations and an introduction to current molecular techniques in the field. Both lecture and lab will emphasize problem solving and experimental data analysis. Three lectures and one 4-hour laboratory per week.  Prerequisites: CH 301 and BI 171. Fall semester.

CH 391-392  Physical Chemistry  8 cr
First semester topics include thermodynamics, phase equilibria, statistical mechanics, and kinetics. Second semester topics include quantum mechanics, spectroscopy and group theory, and an introduction to polymer chemistry. The labs are performed with minimal direct supervision. The lab includes investigations of energetics, molecular structure and reaction
dynamics requiring the use of instrumental systems. Two semester course: Three 50 minute lectures and one 3 hour lab per week. Prerequisite: CH 302, MA 233 and PHYS 206 or consent of the instructor. Student must pass prerequisites with a “C” or better to enroll in CH 391-392. Offered annually. CH 391 Fall semester. CH 392 Spring semester.

MA 131 Calculus of Single Variable Functions   4 cr
This course covers all aspects of single-variable calculus including derivatives, anti-derivatives, definite integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. We highlight how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as laying an oil pipeline around a swamp, fluid pumping and lifting, and how rain catchers are used in city drain systems. We use
computers and calculators extensively, meeting in the computer lab once each week. We also focus on learning how to explain mathematics verbally and in writing. This is the same material that is covered in MA 121-122, except this is an accelerated course that does not review precalculus material. Prerequisite: Previous calculus experience or strong precalculus
background. Fall semester.

MA 121 Differential Calculus  3 cr
This is the first of a two-semester, six-credit calculus sequence. We begin the first semester by reviewing functions from several perspectives (symbolic, numeric, and graphic). For most of the course we study differential calculus, emphasizing how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as police radar detection, laying an oil pipeline around a
swamp, and understanding motion. We use computers and calculators extensively, and we also focus on learning how to explain mathematics verbally and in writing. The sequence MA 121-MA 122 is considered to be equivalent to MA 131. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics including precalculus.

MA 122 Integral Calculus  3 cr
This is the second of a two-semester, six-credit calculus sequence. In this course we study topics in integral calculus, emphasizing how we can use calculus to understand real-world problems such as fluid pumping and lifting, how rain catchers are used in city drain systems, and how a compound bow fires an arrow. We use computers and calculators extensively, and we also focus on learning how to explain mathematics verbally and in writing. The sequence MA 121-MA 122 is considered to be equivalent to MA 131. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in MA 121.

PHYS 205 Engineering Physics I:  Mechanics  4 cr
An introductory calculus-based physics course for chemistry and engineering majors. Topics include statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, conservation of energy and momentum (linear and angular), harmonic motion. Three hours lecture and one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MA 122 or MA 131 required, high school physics recommended. Students must pass prerequisites with a grade of “C” or better to enroll in PHYS 205. Fall semester.

PHSY 206 Engineering Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism   4 cr 
A continuation of PHYS 205. Topics include electrostatics and Gauss’ Law, dielectrics, DC circuits, electromotive force, magnetic field and magnetic properties of matter. Three hours lecture and one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: PHYS 205 required, high school physics recommended. Students must pass PHYS 205 with a grade of “C” or better to enroll in PHYS 206. Spring semester.